Disabled campaigners have launched a new charter t

first_imgDisabled campaigners have launched a new charter that aims to persuade organisations – and individuals – in their local area to treat people with dignity and respect.Ken andTracy McClymont have spent four years working on the Dudley Dignity Charter,which lists 10 key principles for how people should be treated, focusing on areassuch as communication, privacy, choice, control, advocacy and fairness.TheMcClymonts, both key figures in Dudley Centre for Inclusive Living(Dudley CIL), have worked on the charter with another local disabled people’sorganisation, Disability In Action,with support from Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council and Healthwatch Dudley.The couplehave spent years seeking the views of disabled people in Dudley on what shouldbe in the charter, by visiting council-run community forums, day centres, youthclubs for disabled young people, libraries and the local hospital.They weretold how disabled people were being rushed by care workers who had to hurry totheir next appointment; how service-providers were failing to listen to whatservice-users were telling them and not giving them time to explain theirneeds; and how schools were failing to provide support to their disabled pupils,among many other examples of disabled people not being treated with dignity andrespect.Patternssoon began to emerge from what they were being told, which they worked into thecharter’s 10 key principles.TheMcClymonts now plan to take the charter “out on the road”, explaining its 10principles by running stands at local events and locations such as supermarketsand libraries.They alsohope – by setting up a new Dudley Dignity Council – to be able to monitor theimplementation of the charter, hold service-users to account, and even awarddignity charter marks to organisations that show a commitment to the 10 principles.KenMcClymont, who chairs Dudley CIL, said: “Dignity is something we all want,along with respect, but it is a very hard thing for people to explain anddefine.”He said he was “buoyed up” by the launch event (pictured), which was attended by three of the four local MPs, the council’s deputy leader and chief executive, and representatives of the local transport authority, mental health trust and the three emergency services.He added: “Thischarter is unique in that it has been created by the local people themselves.“We do hopethat many local people, businesses, voluntary groups and others with connectionsto the borough will sign up to the charter to encourage everyone to makedignity a thing of importance. “We all wantto be treated with dignity and respect, and hope that this charter will start aconversation.”Cllr Judy Foster, deputy leader of Dudley council,said: “It is an honour and a privilege to have joined those at theDudley Dignity Charter launch event today. “By workingtogether, we can rightly put dignity at the heart of care here in Dudleyborough.“The charterhas been over four years in the making and it is a testament to the dedicationand hard work of everyone at Dudley Centre for Inclusive Living and Disabilityin Action.”last_img read more

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It was a really pleasing result he said We kn

first_img“It was a really pleasing result,” he said. “We knew how hard it was going to be coming here so to come away with a good win was very pleasing.“It was a good start to the game by both sides and there wasn’t much in it. To go in at half time leading 16-0 was fantastic. It was important for us to start well as we haven’t done that over recent weeks and it has made it hard for us.“It was good to get some concentration back and be ready to play. To Wakefield’s credit they made it hard for us but in the end I was pleased to come away with a good win.”He continued: “Tommy Makinson took his finishes well and with Luke Thompson out it was good to see us come up well against a team the size of Wakefield.“Our defence showed some character too and I was really happy defensively, particularly in that first half.”Saints next Super 8s fixture sees them host Wigan Warriors on Friday August 31.Tickets are now on sale from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455052 or online here.last_img read more

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Brunswick county woman suing Chemours and DuPont

first_img “You know, knowing that we’ve been drinking all this water all this time. What’s going to happen to us? What’s our future going to be like,” Carey says.She claims the contamination in the Cape Fear River led to her family’s medical issues. She had a private lab test the water in her hot water heater because she and her husband developed the same thyroid disorder.“We both were treated with biopsies for enlarged nodules on our thyroid. And it just was so strange that both of us have the same type of symptoms and problems and everything and we had been drinking the water for 15 years in this area,” Carey says.Related Article: Wilmington-area gators, fish show high levels of contaminantsShe says the test revealed high levels of GenX in the sludge of her hot water heater. Now, she is suing and wants to hold the companies responsible.“They need to be held accountable for what they’ve done to everybody’s health, their homes,” Carey said.While there are other class action lawsuits against Chemours and DuPont, this is the first lawsuit for medical claims. The law firm representing Carey is ready to fight and is ready to bring them to justice.“Our job and responsibility is to fight them very hard and make sure that the full measure of justice is provided to all the citizens of this area of North Carolina and that DuPont takes full and complete responsibility for their actions,” Ted Leopold, an attorney with Carey, says.While this is happening, the state is not suspending Chemours discharge permit, for now. BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Chemours and DuPont now face four lawsuits and one woman is suing over the discharge of GenX in the Cape Fear River.“Shocked, surprised and scared,” is how Victoria Carey describes what it was like when she first learned of GenX.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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FEMA trailers and benefit concert to provide relief for flood victims

first_imgBURGAW, NC (WWAY) – Recovery efforts continue across Pender County as residents clean up from Hurricane Florence which damaged and destroyed homes in coastal and inland communities.“Our first responders were amazing,” said Pender County Spokeswoman Tammy Proctor, “We had 1,870 rescue missions and they pulled more than 3,700 people out of the water.”- Advertisement – Two weeks after the massive storm, residents in Burgaw, Topsail Island, Canetuck, Currie, and other communities continue to clean up from the Category 1 storm.Proctor says residents across the county are working hard to get their lives and their property back in order.“They want to get back to their homes, they want to muck out those homes, they want to rebuild, they’re very, very resilient,” she said.Related Article: Charges dismissed against woman who sheltered animals during FlorenceUnfortunately, some residents suffered complete or partial loss in recent years during Hurricanes Floyd and Matthew, and now they’re facing the same challenges again with the aftermath of Hurricane Florence.“This hurricane surpassed all those benchmarks as far as rainfall and river risings, so it is the new record,” Proctor added.For residents who sought refuge in an emergency shelter at Pender High School, there may be relief coming in the form of temporary trailers.“Those folks will be transitioned into some sort of housing or they can go live with friends but we want to keep folks in the community so the lives of children aren’t disrupted and they can go to their own schools,” Proctor said.Meanwhile, a number of groups including volunteer organizations and agencies have come to the county to assist with relief efforts.“Right now, we’re trying to make sure distribution centers have what they need and that those volunteers that are servicing those areas in Currie or Highway 53 are able to get those supplies to those homes that are in need,” said Pender County Volunteer Coordinator Olivia Dawson. “We still need volunteers and hands that are able to work–there are a lot of homes that need to be cleaned out.”If you would like to donate items to flood victims or volunteer, call 910-259-0311.Due to Florence, Pender County Tourism has postponed some activities planned for October like its annual Ghost Walking Tour at the courthouse, but other things are in the works including a flood relief benefit concert.“The director of Pender County Emergency Operations has some connections with Nashville so we are looking to see if we can have a pretty good benefit concert,” said Dawson.Pender County Tourism hopes to host the event in November in downtown Burgaw but details are incomplete at this time.This fall, community and business leaders in the eastern portion of the county plan to host the annual Autumn in Topsail which is a major boost to tourism.“They are so excited, they feel they are providing something to give everyone a little entertainment and respite on the island,” Proctor said. “It is the largest festival on the island.”last_img read more

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Wilmington business owner facing additional charges

first_img In December 2017, a boat was stolen from Gore’s boat shop in Wilmington. Investigators say Gore went searching his missing boat after receiving a tip that it was in Bladen County. He found two men at an abandoned lumber mill.Sheriff’s spokesman Maj. Larry Guyton said Gore allegedly shot Blanchard, 34, in the head and he later died from his injuries.A trial date of February 18, 2019 has been set. BLADEN COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A New Hanover County business owner originally charged with second-degree murder in the death of a Kelly man last December now faces additional charges after being indicted by the Bladen County grand jury.According to the District Attorney’s Office, David Gore, 57, was indicted Oct. 1 for one count each of first-degree murder, first-degree kidnapping and second-degree kidnapping in the death of Allen Blanchard.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Jelly Beans skating rink officially closes doors skaters enjoy the final night

first_img For nearly ten years, Jelly Beans Family Skate Center has played host to parties, after school programs and more. For the first time in more than 30 years, the Oleander Drive space will not be home to a skating rink.For those skaters young and old, it was more than a skating rink, and they made sure to enjoy the most of its final night.“It’s all happened here in this one big special place,” said skater Madiyn Craft.Related Article: 2 men injured in drive-by shooting in WilmingtonIt’s where many of them honed their skills.“I was pretty embarrassed because I didn’t know how to skate I was on the wall the whole time,” said Jayce Ritter skating with his young sister Madiyn. “I was busting my butt a lot, but as long as you know you’re having fun that’s all that matters.”Monday night was a night dozens were fretting. None more than Jelly Beans general manager Ava Bromeier. She was one of the first people who got a job there 9 and a half years ago working the concessions.“I love everything about this place. I actually learned how to skate before I learned how to walk,” said Bromeier.It’s safe to say she has spent more hours at Jelly Beans not only working but off the clock, for her it was a calming place.“You see a lot of emotions with people that come in here. Everybody is going through something and when they come in here and when they walk out of the door you don’t see that anymore,” said Bromeier. “It’s kind of like relief.”Skating on a Monday night came as a sweet relief for many both young and old.“Normally I don’t get to come on Monday nights so I was really glad that I got to come,” said Katelyn Brosser.It’s not the fun night skates that Wilmington will lose after Jelly Beans goes, the rink played a setting for so many events.“It’s after school, it’s summer camp, it’s birthday parties, it’s fundraisers,” said Bromeier.Now those groups and organizations will have to look towards places like Scooters skating center or the maybe the Wilmington Ice House. For several skaters, there is no replacement.“I was crying when I found out that it was closing because I had been going here for so long,” said Ashlyn Johnson.Monday night does not mark the complete end to Jelly Beans. The staff is working out sales of equipment to places like Scooters, however, whatever is left over will be sold to the public.Bromeier tells us that items like skates and more will be open for public sale Tuesday afternoon from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and Wednesday afternoon around similar times. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — It’s the end of a skating era in Wilmington.Jelly Beans announced it was sold earlier this month and Monday night was the last night locals could lace up and hit the rink.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Castle Hayne woman accused of insurance fraud

first_img According to the arrest warrant, the offense occurred on Nov. 1, 2018.Powell was arrested on March 14. An Onslow County magistrate gave Powell a $2,800 unsecured bond.Powell was charged with felony insurance fraud.Related Article: Board: NC lawmaker didn’t disclose $140K in activityNorth Carolina Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey says fraud is felt every time consumers pay their insurance premiums. Causey estimates fraud costs North Carolinians between 15 and 20 cents on every dollar paid on insurance premiums.“Insurance fraud affects our economy.  Not only does it damage insurance companies, it cheats businesses and consumers too,” Commissioner Causey said. “This kind of white-collar crime is unacceptable. That’s why I’ve doubled the number of Special Agents to investigate insurance fraud. Cracking down on fraud will put more money in the pockets of businesses and consumers.”To report suspected fraud, contact the NC Department of Insurance Criminal Investigations Division at 919-807-6840. Information is also available at www.ncdoi.com. NEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A 25-year-old Castle Hayne woman is accused of insurance fraud.Jeneva Powell allegedly lied to Nationwide Insurance Co. about how her SUV was damaged. Investigators learned it happened during a fight between her and her boyfriend.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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New Hanover senior Blake Walston drafted 26th overall by the Arizona Diamondbacks

first_img He was the second high school player selected by the Diamondbacks on Monday night in the first round of the draft.Walston has signed his National Letter of Intent to play baseball at N.C. State. New Hanover senior Blake Walston pitching against Hoggard. (WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY)– The Arizona Diamondbacks made a splash on Monday night by drafting New Hanover High School senior Blake Walston with the 26th pick in the 2019 MLB Draft.Walston was dominant in his senior season for the Wildcats. The southpaw went a perfect 12-0 on the mound with a 0.20 ERA. He struck out 129 hitters in 68.2 innings pitched.- Advertisement – last_img

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Watch Can Christian and Muslim communities coexist

first_imgFor the past few years, Balzan Parish Church has been organising a session of prayer and reflection, which has seen Catholics and Muslims coming together. Those in attendance include representatives from the Islamic Centre, clergy from the parish and members of the Commission for Interreligious Dialogue, among others. This year, the event took place at the Islamic Centre for the first time. Newsbook.com.mt interviewed Rev. Dr Joseph Ellul who lectures at the Faculty of Theology at the University of Malta. He also heads the Commission for Interreligious Dialogue which was founded in March 2011, with the aim to establish ties between the Catholic Church in Malta and non-Christian communities in Malta. One of its principal aims is to contribute towards the formation of the Roman Catholic community in Malta so that it may better recognise its mission in a society which is becoming more multi-ethnic and multi-religious.Rev. Ellul said that its role also includes updating and advising the Archbishop on situations or challenges which the community may face. Currently, he explained, the Commission, in collaboration with the University of Malta, is preparing a handbook on various religions aimed at professionals such as doctors and social workers.During the interview, Rev. Ellul was asked various questions relating to the similarities and divergences between Catholicism and Islam, and whether the two communities can co-exist. Rev. Ellul referred to Nostra aetate, which is the Declaration on the Relation of the Church with Non-Christian Religions of the Second Vatican Council, saying that both communities have co-existed for many centuries. He said that while each religion begins with God, the religions are then made up of human beings, and therefore there are good and bad elements. He explained that in societies where you have the two communities co-existing, one can witness a lot of collaboration among the different communities. Rev. Ellul explained that this has happened since forever, citing examples of Catholic communities in predominantly Muslim countries such as Egypt, Iraq and Syria. Asked about the similarities between the two religions, Rev. Ellul said that in both Catholicism and Islam one finds the belief in one God. He further explained that one finds several similarities especially if one reflects upon the Old Testament. He explained that various attributes to God can be found in both the Quran and the Bible, such as God as the creator, God as the judge and God as the merciful. Rev. Ellul further explained that various messages pronounced by the prophets are found in both the Bible and the Quran. When asked where the two religions diverge, Rev. Ellul said that there are two main points of divergence. The first was on the question of God as a Trinity, explaining that while the Quran speaks about a trinity, in the Quran God is the father, Jesus the son, and Mary the mother. He explained that this influence could have easily come from Christian communities present in Arabia at that time, which were on the periphery, adding that, “it is not a big deal that heretic communities existed which may have believed so”. The second point, Rev. Ellul added, was that for Islam, it is inconceivable that God became man. He explained that for a Catholic, the Quran cannot be recognised as a holy scripture in the same sense as the Bible. For the Catholic, the Bible was ‘closed’ when the last apostle died, meaning that there are no more scriptures after that. Rev. Ellul added that Catholics believe that Jesus is the revelation of God, saying that if one who is Catholic had to consider the Prophet Muhammad as a prophet in the Biblical sense then it would mean that Jesus is not the complete revelation of God, and therefore it would mean that something is lacking in the Catholic revelation. Rev. Ellul explained that this does not turn the Prophet Muhammad into a ‘false prophet’, as he was referred to in the dialogues between Timothy I of Baghdad, a Patriarch, and Caliph al-Mahdi in the Eight Century (781CE), when Caliph al-Mahdi had asked the Patriarch what he thought of Muhammad. The Patriarch had replied that Muhammad deserves all the praise he gets, because he followed in the footsteps of the prophets, and those who love God. Rev. Ellul said that through that answer, Timothy I had recognised Muhammad and his message; however he could not refer to him as a prophet in the biblical sense. When asked about the difference between Muslims and Islamists, Rev. Ellul said, “there is a huge difference between the two”, explaining that a Muslim is one who believes in Islam, while an Islamist is one who has transformed his religion into an ideology. He underlined that in the latter case, it is dangerous. Finally, Rev. Ellul referred to a decision by the Council of Ministers in Lebanon, which had declared the feast of the Annunciation of Mary as a national Islamic-Christian holiday. He explained that even at the peak of the crusades, many Marian sanctuaries were visited by Catholics and Muslims alike. WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more

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22 Medals for Maltese Artistic Gymnastics in Liverpool

first_imgFourteen gymnasts from ISC Gymnastics Club (Malta), as well as four coaches, recently returned from a competition in the UK where they won 22 medals in all.The City of Liverpool Gymnastics Club hosted their annual Summer Sparkle Invitational – Women’s Artistic Gymnastics Competition featuring the four main types of equipment (Vault, Bar, Beam and Floor).The Maltese gymnasts took part in this competition and competed against girls hailing from: Rochdale Olympic Gymnastics Club (Manchester); SA Gymnastics (Stockport); City of Newcastle Gymnastics Academy; Gymfinity (Knutsford, Cheshire), Wigan Gymnastics Club (Manchester); Burnley Gymnastics Club (Lancashire) and Bebington, Cheshire.According to coach David Micallef, this was a huge, if not an overwhelming, success for this group of gymnasts.The awards included a first place – overall score by Nicole Polidano, and Sarah Azzopardi placing 3rd. Kaya Leonardi placed second in a separate category with her overall score.Other gymnasts placed first, second or third on specific equipment.Anyone interested in starting artistic gymnastics may contact Audrey Sultana on tel. no: 99892694 or check out the ISC Gymnastics Club (Malta) Facebook page.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=a7617b59&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=128&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=a7617b59&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more

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