To win equality by law

first_imgTo win equality by law In 1954, in Brown v Board of Education the Supreme Court unanimously held that the doctrine of “separate but equal,” established in Plessy v. Ferguson violated the 14th Amendment right to equal protection under the law. But did that really change America? What exactly does “equal” mean? Thurgood Marshall, an attorney for the NAACP, argued the case of Brown v. Board of Education before the United States Supreme Court. He later became the first black United States Supreme Court justice. After his retirement, he was asked what he thought “equal” meant. He replied: “Equal means getting the same thing, at the same time, and in the same place.” How has the concept of “equal” changed over the last 50 years?In 1930, Thurgood Marshall applied to the University of Maryland Law School, but was denied admission because he was black. Affirmative Action policies were instituted in the 1960’s to remedy perceived injustice caused by historical racial discrimination. Formerly, race was used as a means to keep minorities out of colleges; now race is used as a means to get minorities into colleges. Journalist and biographer Juan Williams interviewed Thurgood Marshall and asked him his view of the politics of race in America. Justice Marshall answered, “Discrimination as usual. You have to be exactly better than the white man. Well, your whole background is that you never have been better, and the white man has had it all along. There’s not a white man in this country that can say ‘never benefited by being white.’ There’s not a white man in the country that can say it.” Justice Marshall believed, decades after Brown v. Board of Education, that the elimination of desegregation was only a piece of the puzzle; simply “being white” gives you certain inherent benefits, even in the absence of government-approved segregation or intentional discrimination. This was precisely the situation which affirmative action was meant to correct—to “level the playing field” and provide opportunities that have historically been denied to minorities solely because of their race. To win equality by law Editor’s Note: The following essay was written by Erica Emas, a 16-year-old student at Miami Killian Senior High School. The essay won the Florida Law Week Essay contest and was read by Emas at the Supreme Court ceremonial session recognizing the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Forty years ago, a single image first seared the heart and stirred the conscience of our nation; so powerful most of us who saw it then recall it still. A 15-year-old girl wearing a crisp black and white dress, carrying only a notebook, surrounded by large crowds of boys and girls, men and women, soldiers and police officers, her head held high, her eyes fixed straight ahead. And she is utterly alone. On September 4th, 1957, Elizabeth Eckford walked to this door for her first day of school, utterly alone. She was turned away by people who were afraid of change, instructed by ignorance, hating what they simply could not understand. And America saw her, haunted and taunted for the simple color of her skin, and in the image we caught a very disturbing glimpse of ourselves. center_img June 1, 2004 Erica Emas Regular News Bill Clinton illustrated his point clearly when delivering the above speech (known as “The Central High Speech”) in September of 1997. We as Americans have made little progress in the integration of our society. Today, children of every race walk through the same schoolhouse door, but then they often walk down different halls. Not only in Central High, but in high schools across America, students congregate in separate areas, eat at separate tables, sit in different sections of the bleachers at football games. Many students choose to be with people of their own race or ethnicity because it feels “safe” and comfortable.The same can be said of adults 50 years after Brown v. Board of Education. While pride in our ethnicity and heritage is important, we also pay a price — ethnic “ghettos” by choice. Miami has Little Havana, Little Haiti, and dozens of other tight-knit communities without nicknames but with a similar uniformity in the makeup of its residents. Far too many communities are all-white, all-African American, all-Hispanic, all-Haitian. The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., 40 years ago said, “Sunday is the most segregated day in America.” He meant that in our public lives (during the school week, for example) the law requires integration of the races. But in our private lives, in our private choices (attending church on Sunday for example), Americans continue to live segregated, separated lives. Indeed, too many Americans of all races have actually begun to give up on the idea of integration and the search for common ground. The Little Rock Nine taught us that we need one America and we cannot have one America for free, without sacrifice. Not 50 years ago, not today. If those nine children could walk up those steps 40 years ago, all alone, if their parents could send them into the storm armed only with school books and the righteousness of their cause, then surely together we can build one America — an America that ensures no future generation of our children will have to live in fear and ignorance of our fellow Americans, whatever their race or ethnicity.In so many ways, we continue to hold ourselves back from what we, together, could become. We retreat into the comfortable enclaves of ethnic isolation. We simply choose not to interact with people who are different from us. Segregation is no longer the law, but too often, separation is still the rule. And we cannot ignore one stubborn fact that remains crystal clear: So long as we choose to remain separate, we will never all truly be equal.last_img read more

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Nassau Debates New District Maps, Court Fight Looms

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Republican-controlled Nassau County legislature is close to approving redrawn district lines that will force four Democratic incumbents into two districts when they seek re-election this fall despite legal challenges and accusations of gerrymandering.The new political map will also put two Republicans into the same district as a part of the once-a-decade redistricting process required to ensure legislators represent an equal amount of residents based on 2010 census data. County Executive Ed Mangano, a Republican, is expected to sign the new map into law, if it passes as widely anticipated at the legislature’s next meeting on March 4.“This is not an easy task,” Presiding Officer Norma Gonsalves (R-East Meadow) said before adjourning the meeting shortly before 1 a.m. Tuesday. She pleaded at times for the audience not disrupt the meeting in the packed legislative chamber of the Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building in Mineola, reminding the crowd that redistricting is legally required “in order to guarantee the constitutional protection of one person, one vote.”Legis. Dave Denenberg (D-Merrick) had his 10-block-wide sliver of his neighborhood lump his house into the neighboring district, pitting him against Legis. Joseph Scannell (D-Baldwin). Legis. Delia DeRiggi-Whitton (D-Glen Cove) saw her district merged with that of Legis. Wayne Wink (D-Roslyn). And the district held by newly elected Michael Venditto (R-North Massapequa) absorbed the part of a neighboring district that’s home to Legis. Joseph Belesi (R-Farmingdale), who Newsday reports may be retiring.Democrats drew the current map when they had the majority in the legislature a decade ago but their proposal to keep the same districts intact was rejected. In 2011, the New York State Court of Appeals threw out an earlier version of the redrawn lines that the Nassau GOP legislative majority rushed through before that year’s elections with little public input.“Packing and cracking have long been used to gerrymander districts,” said Nancy Rosenthal, co-president of the League of Womens Voters of Nassau County, referring to the practice of redrawing political maps to pack districts with voters registered to the majority party and crack apart areas where members of the opposition party live. “It is demoralizing to see it happening to this extent in Nassau.”Analysts predict the redrawn map could help Republicans add two seats to their majority, or potentially three seats that could give the GOP a supermajority, according to Brian Paul, research and policy coordinator at Common Cause New York, a nonprofit organization that proposed an alternate map with a coalition of other nonpartisan advocacy groups.That’s despite the fact that Democrats have a nearly 36,000-enrollment advantage over Republicans—368,049 Dems vs. 332,197 GOP out of 960,331 registered voters in Nassau, according to the latest New York State Board of Elections data. There’s also 212,932 unaffiliated voters, 33,408 Independence Party registrants, 10,249 registered Conservatives, 2,132 Working Family Party members, 1,159 members of the Green Party and 175 listed as “other,” the data shows.“The only real benefit of moving 360,000-plus people is to shift things around so there is …  incumbent safety or partisan politics advantage,” said Frederick Brewington, a Hempstead-based civil rights attorney who plans to sue the county over the map, if it’s approved. “At some point the question will be asked of you—explain yourself. And in this situation, the concept of this just being a policy decision is not going to cut it.”Critics also decried the legislative majority for planning to pass a map certain to rack up legal fees the financially strapped county can’t afford over alleged violations of the Voting Rights Act.Brewington joined others who personally appealed to the legislators, especially Legis. Denise Ford of Long Beach, a registered Democrat who caucuses with the Republicans.In addition to members of various civic organizations, the dozens of speakers who voiced opposition to the new map before the vote included elected officials from the villages of East Hills and Freeport as well as the Uniondale and Great Neck school districts.Francis Moroney, chairman of Nassau Temporary Districting Commission, said the panel hired Albany-based Skyline Demographic Consultants to draw the first draft of the map before it was tweaked to address concerns the public raised at a series of hearings.“Every decision you make flows through and affects someplace else,” said Moroney, likening the process of trying to keep communities with similar interests together to an overflowing bowl of Jell-O. “It doesn’t happen in a vacuum. And it’s certainly not a perfect process.”Adam Haber, a Roslyn school board member challenging former County Executive Tom Suozzi for the Democratic Party line to run against Mangano in November, doubted the fairness of the redistricting process.“It’s obvious that the will of the people is against this process and the map,” said Haber, an East Hills resident. “What’s the point of … this hearing if the elected officials don’t listen?”Denenberg made one last stand before the meeting was adjourned for the fight to continue next month, when another lengthy debate is sure to ensure.“The only reason for that line is to come after me,” he told Morony, pointing to the sliver of the proposed District 14 that juts into southern Merrick, separating his neighborhood from the rest of the hamlet in proposed District 13. “That line that you drew in Merrick … strangely is two houses from my house.”last_img read more

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Long Island St. Patrick’s Day 2014 Events

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York St. Patrick’s Day is on March 17St. Patrick’s Day is right around the corner and on Long Island it’s basically a month-long celebration. March 17 falls on a Monday this year, but for those looking to celebrate their Irish heritage early or even afterward, we’ve compiled this list of local events for the occasion:Saturday, March 8Event: St. Patrick’s Day Scavenger HuntWhen: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.Where: Suffolk County Farm, 350 Yaphank Ave., YaphankWhat: Includes wagon ride, light refreshments, animal feedingCost: $6Event: Third Annual St. Patrick’s Day CelebrationWhen: 12-5p.m.Where: Old Bethpage Village Restoration, BethpageWhat: Irish rock bands The Sporting Paddies and The Mickey Finns perform; Kevin Westley performs Irish history in song; Bagpipers and fiddlers live throughout the day; Traditional Irish food and beveragesCost: FreeEvent: Black 47: The Farewell PerformanceWhen: 8 p.m.Where: The YMCA Boulton Center, 37 West Main St., Bay ShoreCost: $35-$45Event: Bay Shore St. Patrick’s Day ParadeWhen: 1-4:30 p.m.Where: Main Street between Saxon Avenue and Community RoadCost: FreeSunday, March 9Event: Huntington’s 80th St. Patrick’s Day ParadeWhen: 2 p.m.Where: Parade starts north of Huntington Train Station along New York Ave., turns west on Main St., ends at Saint Patrick’s ChurchCost: FreeTuesday, March 11Event: Dropkick Murphy’s St. Patrick’s Day Tour 2014 with Guests Lucero and Skinny ListerWhen: 8:00 p.m.Where: The Paramount Theatre, 370 Huntington Ave., HuntingtonFriday, March 14Event: 2U: St. Patty’s CelebrationWhen: 8 p.m.Where: The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., PatchogueWhat: 2U, “The World’s Second Best U2 Show,” performs; must be 21 or overSaturday, March 15Event: St. Patty’s Day Leprechaun Bar CrawlWhen: 12-6 p.m.Where: Huntington VillageWhat: Drink specials, costume contest; raises money for local charity; must be 21 or overCost: Preordered tickets are $25, $30 at doorEvent: St. Patrick’s Day DanceWhen: 7 p.m.-11p.m.Where: American Legion Post 1120, 80 Herbert Ave., LindenhurstWhat: Irish food and open bar; Grand Blvd performs live; Bagpipers and Irish step dancers performCost: $25Event: “Dirty Old Town” A St. Patrick’s Day Punk Rock BashWhen: 10 p.m.Where: Club Revolution, 140 Merrick Rd., AmityvilleWhat: Live music from Nihilistics, Jones Crusher, Boogie Brains, DJs playing music of Shane MacGowan and The Pogues; Guinness Jameson Irish Mist Green Beer Specials all night; must be 18 or overCost: $10, $7 for those dressed in green; First 25 leprechauns with shillelaghs get in for freeSunday, March 16Event: 16th Annual Irish Experience FestivalWhen: 11 a.m.-5 p.m.Where: David S. Mack Sports and Exhibition Sports Complex, 245 Hofstra University, HempsteadWhat: Live performances by The Tommy Mulhivill Band, The Black Velvet Band, Katie’s Puppets, Hirten Family Irish Dancers, and MC Tony Jackson; Irish food/vendors throughout the dayCost: $7 for adults, $5 for senior citizens, free for children under 12Event: WBAB presents Roger and JP’s Corned Beef and ChaosWhen: 12 -5 p.m.Where: The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., PatchogueWhat: Live broadcast with Roger and JP; “Doctor Dirty” John Valby perform; Scotty the Leprechaun; must be 21 or overCost: Free AdmissionEvent: Family St. Patrick’s Day WalkWhen: 1:30-3p.m.Where: Caleb Smith State Park Preserve, 581 West Jericho Tpke., SmithtownEvent: Celtic Tenors ConcertWhen: 7:30 p.m.Where: The Paramount Theatre, 370, New York Ave., HuntingtonSaturday, March 22Event: Rockville Centre St. Patrick’s Day ParadeWhen: 12 p.m.Where: Starts in Municipal Parking Field # 12 at North Forest Ave., ends on Municipal Parking Field #2; Preceded by Commemorative Mass at 9 a.m. at St. Agnes CathedralSunday, March 23Event: Montauk St. Patrick’s Day ParadeWhen: 11:30 a.m.Where: Starts at Edgemere Rd., turns onto Main St, and ends at end of Main St., by IGA; Starting at 10 a.m. on the reviewing stand on the green hit clam chowder will be served in St. Patrick’s Day souvenir mugsSunday, March 30Event: St. Patty’s Day after PartyWhen: 12 p.m.Where: The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., PatchogueWhat: Outdoor beer garden and barbeque; must be 21 or overCost: Free Admissionlast_img read more

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Ireland may tighten travel restrictions for COVID-19 hot spots

first_img“We’re looking at countries that may effectively become hot spots for COVID-19 in the months ahead, or indeed regions within countries, and looking at ways in which we can deal with that risk,” Coveney told national broadcaster RTE.Arrivals into Ireland from Malta, Finland, Norway, Hungary, Italy, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Cyprus, Slovakia, Greenland, Greece, Gibraltar, Monaco and San Marino no longer have to restrict their movements.The selection was shorter than many other countries’ “green lists”, including British-run Northern Ireland, which shares an open land border with Ireland where no travel restrictions are imposed.While Irish travellers returning from the 15 countries will not have to quarantine either, the government took out full-page newspaper advertisements on Wednesday telling people that the safest things to do was not to travel anywhere.”The message is still clear, the safest thing to do is not to take your holidays abroad, look after your family, spend your money at home and holiday at home,” Coveney said, noting that, while travel to and from Ireland was at around 7-8% of its usual level, 50,000 Irish people were still travelling abroad a week.  Ireland may introduce further travel restrictions for countries with a very high instance of COVID-19, Foreign Minister Simon Coveney said on Wednesday after the government lifted its 14-day quarantine requirement for 15 European countries.Ireland, which has one of the lower rates of infection in the European Union with around 5 cases per 100,000 people in the past 14 days, decided late on Tuesday to drop the restriction for people coming from countries with a similar or lower rate.Coveney said the government would turn its attention in the coming weeks to whether it should introduce steps beyond the 14-day quarantine from areas hardest hit, including a potential requirement to take a coronavirus test before departure. Topics :last_img read more

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Wolf Administration Announces 312 New Jobs with Expansion of Almac Group Facilities in Montgomery County

first_img November 10, 2016 Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, as part of a stop on his ‘Jobs that Pay’ tour, Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin announced that Almac Group, Inc., a global contract pharmaceutical development and manufacturing organization, will expand operations at its existing U.S. headquarters in Souderton, Montgomery County, and double its physical presence in nearby Lansdale, Montgomery County. The company’s expansion will create 312 new jobs over the next three years.“In 2007, Almac Group invested $100 million, retained 495 jobs, and created another 264 jobs, when it successfully established its U.S. headquarters in Pennsylvania,” said Governor Wolf. “Since then, we’ve seen Almac Group’s significant contributions to the economic vitality of the region as a major player in southeastern Pennsylvania’s strong bio-pharma industry, and we look forward to its continued success as it once again chooses Pennsylvania for its operations expansion.”While a majority of Almac Group’s growth can be accommodated within its current 240,000-square-foot headquarters facility, the company will lease an additional 26,000-square-feet of office space in Lansdale. Almac Group plans to invest more than $24.4 million in the expansion project, including substantial investments in new machine lines, computer equipment, software, and an expanded cold storage area. Additionally, the company has committed to the creation of 312 new, full-time jobs over the next three years, and to the retention of 1,110 existing employees.“Due to significant industry demand for our services, it is essential we build capacity and increase headcount to ensure we continue to compete at a global level. This year we are celebrating our 20th year in the US, and having experienced tremendous success we are excited to make a further commitment within the Montgomery County area,” said Almac Group CEO Alan Armstrong. “This investment signifies our confidence in the pool of talent and skills right on our doorstep.  We truly appreciate the guidance and support provided by both the Governor’s Action Team and the Department of Community and Economic Development throughout this entire process and look forward to a very exciting future together.”Almac Group received a funding proposal from the Department of Community and Economic Development comprised of a $1.56 million Pennsylvania First Program grant.The project was coordinated by the Governor’s Action Team, an experienced group of economic development professionals who report directly to the governor and work with businesses that are considering locating or expanding in Pennsylvania, in collaboration with DCED’s Office of International Business Development.Headquartered in Craigavon, Northern Ireland, Almac Group, Inc. is an established contract development and manufacturing organization that provides an extensive range of integrated services to companies within the pharmaceutical and biotech sectors, globally. The company’s services include research and development, biomarker discovery, development and commercialization, active pharmaceutical ingredients manufacture, formulation development, and clinical trial supply. Almac Group employs more than 4,500 highly skilled personnel throughout its operations in the UK, Ireland, the United States, and Asia.The ‘Jobs that Pay’ tour is an effort by state agencies to promote good-paying, family-sustaining jobs and career-paths available to job-seekers across the commonwealth, and to listen and learn from employers and employees about workforce development needs.For more information about Almac Group, visit www.almacgroup.com.For more information on the Governor’s Action Team or DCED, visit dced.pa.us.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Wolf Administration Announces 312 New Jobs with Expansion of Almac Group Facilities in Montgomery Countylast_img read more

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Market

first_imgAustralia: Westinghouse Brake & Signal Co (Australia) Ltd has won a A$4m contract for signalling equipment on Sydney’s Homebush Bay Olympic branch.Bangladesh: The Asian Development Bank has commissioned Rendel Palmer & Tritton to examine the potential for the Jamuna road bridge to accommodate track wider than the 1000mm gauge line it has been designed to carry. Brazil: MRS Logística SA, the private operator of Rffsa’s former SR3 and SR4 regions (RG 12.96 p811), has signed a contract with Tecfer, Hatch & Kirk and Montana Rail Link for the overhaul of six SD38 locomotives.Bulgaria: BDZ has invited tenders for the supply and installation of five underfloor wheel lathes.China: Koni is to supply over 4000 primary and secondary suspension dampers for 324 coaches under construction for Chinese Railways. Colombia: Brazilian contractor Andreade Gutierrez has purchased two containerised mobile welder units from Holland Co for use in track upgrading.Czech Republic: ZS Brno has completed modernisation of the 31·5 km Uhersko – Chocen section of CD’s Decin – Breclav route at a cost of Kcs1·10bn.Germany: Sanivac Vakuumtechnik and Staudenmayer have won an order from Adtranz for 150 self-contained toilet modules to be installed on German Railway’s VT612 tilting DMUs.Südwestdeutsche Verkehrs-AG has ordered 32 more Type RS1 Regioshuttle lightweight diesel railcars from Adtranz for DM80m; they will be used by the Bodensee-Oberschwabenbahn and Karl-Grund Verkehrsgesellschaft.Great Britain: BR Research has obtained a contract from GEC Alsthom to work on key aspects of the safety case for Juniper EMUs to operate under lease on Railtrack 25 kV 50Hz and 750V DC routes.Stewart Fraser is to supply 1020 sliding glass and aluminium doors for platform screens on London Underground’s Jubilee line extension, under subcontract from Westinghouse Brakes Ltd.Hungary: MAV has awarded a contract worth HF2·3bn to Debreceni Jarmujavito Rt for the maintenance of 2800 freight wagons, including 700 tank cars. India: Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd is to manufacture 53 electric locos for lease to Indian Railways.Iran: India Railway Construction Co has secured a US$25m contract to supply signalling for IIRR’s Ahwaz – Bandar Emam Khomayni route. Lithuania: LG has issued a general procurement notice for track renewal and maintenance equipment worth an estimated ECU39bn, in addition to 52000 concrete sleepers and 53 switches. Norway: Train interior and seats manufacturer VBK is to supply VBK5000 second-class seats for a further four Danish State Railways’ IR-4 EMUs. VBK has already equipped 40 of the four-car units to be used on services across the Storebaelt link from June 1, and is also supplying interior components for Norway’s Gardermoen airport trains.Romania: Sncfr has issued prequalification documents for the overhaul and modernisation of 16 diesel and 24 electric locos, funded by an EBRD loan.Russia: Taylor Woodrow has begun preliminary work on a US$199m terminus complex in St Petersburg for RAO VSM’s high-speed route to Moscow.Slovakia: TSS Bratislava has ordered a TL50 tracklayer from Desec of Finland.Tunisia: Sncft has called tenders for the provision of technical assistance for bridge strengthening and repair work on the Tunis – Sousse – Gabès route. Turkey: TCDD has issued a tender for the supply of 60 electric locos, expected to cost US$240m. Tenders are due to be issued soon for electrification of the Aliaga – Cumaovasi route.USA: Boise Locomotive Co has won a US$4m contract to overhaul 10 GP50 diesel locos for Union Pacific.New Jersey Transit has awarded a US$56·4m contract to Slattery/Sordoni Construction for structures and embankments, as part of the Secaucus Transfer project (RG 1.97 p32).Hatch Mott MacDonald, Jacobs Engineering and ACG Environments have won a US$65m construction management contract for extension of the Red line to East Los Angeles (RG 2.97 p82).last_img read more

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Ex-Man City winger Henri Ogunby joins Burnley

first_img Loading… Henri Ogunby has signed a short-term contract with Burnley until the end of the season.  Henri Ogunby  The 18-year old winger, who turns 19 on Tuesday, featured for the Under-23s against Nottingham Forest and Sheffield United in the Professional Development League earlier this month, on a  trial basis.Advertisement Bolton-born Ogunby joins the Clarets from Manchester City, where he featured for the U18sand U23s side on a regular basis. Read Also:Man United players treated to spa after Burnley defeat He also trained with City’s first team several times, with the teenager making his debutfor the youth team at just 15 years old. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By OdeithThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More7 Train Stations In The World You Wish To Stay At Longer9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Valuelast_img read more

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Season-ending streak sends Gould to 4th Razor Chassis South Central Region prize

first_imgGould now has 139 wins over the course of his IMCA Modified career, a total that has him in the top 25 all-time for the division. Gould won his final six, and seven of his last eight IMCA Modified starts of the season in clinching his career fourth Razor Chassis South Central Region crown. William Gould ended the 2019 season with six straight IMCA Modified feature wins and his career fourth Razor Chassis South Central Region championship. (Photo by Stacy Kolar, Southern Sass Photography) HIS SPONSORS: Gould Race Cars and Innovative Traction Solutions, both of Calera; D&R Construction, Caney; Bob’s Machine Shop, Hulbert; Champs Graphics and T’s of Elk City; Smiley’s Racing Products of Mesquite, Texas; Guillaume Motorsports of Haslet, Texas; Dirt Defender of Waxahachie, Texas; Mark Herring Race Engines, Plainview, Texas; 4T Concrete Pumping, Whitesborough, Texas; Adams Automotive, Van Alstyne, Texas; Jerry’s Bit Service, Decatur, Texas; Speed Shift TV; Hanjack Farms; Carey Menasco; John and Nikki Webb; Dustin Matlock; Steven Lewallen; BSB Manufacturing of Wellington, Kan.; Landrum Springs of Mentone, Ind.; and Pat Fagen and Fast Shafts of Des Moines, Iowa. HIS CREW: Wife Dana, son David and daughter Daisy.  CALERA, Okla. – With titles on the line, William Gould was at his best. His travels took Gould to 10 different tracks. He already had Southern Oklahoma Speedway and E3 Spark Plus Oklahoma State titles in hand before that late flurry of feature wins, which added the Grayson County Speedway track and ultimately the regional prize to his resume. From Calera, Okla., Gould collected 15 feature wins, five of them coming in a dozen open motor outings, along with another 22 top five finishes in 55 starts.center_img Starts 55                     Wins 15                         Additional Top Fives 22 “We didn’t do anything different the last month and a half,” said Gould, who had struggled with powerplant issues. “We had a string of bad luck with crate engines but when the car ran, everything was fine.” “Our number and percentage of wins were not outstanding. This was not a Cinderella season for us by any means,” said Gould, looking forward to better things in 2020. “The good news is we’re still racing.” He’d won national and regional crowns in 2013, then paced regional points again in 2014 and 2017. “Both Southern Oklahoma and Grayson County are about an hour away from home. If you’re going to win the region and have hopes of doing well nationally (he was third) you need to win two track championships and have good car counts,” Gould said. “When you find a track that is loyal to the sanctioning body, you need to be loyal to that track. There are a lot of more expensive options if you want to go racing but I’d rather save the money.” And his best is very, very good.last_img read more

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No. 23 Syracuse snaps out of early funk, scores 3 goals to top Cornell in shutout

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 16, 2014 at 10:34 pm Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidman Head coach Ian McIntyre was concerned about a letup after a tightly contested, emotional game against Notre Dame on Saturday.His worries came to fruition during a stagnant first 17 minutes, as he frustratedly paced back and forth on the sideline while yelling at Stefanos Stamoulacatos to “find the game.”Minutes later, Stamoulacatos responded, swiftly assisting on a Juuso Pasanen goal and Emil Ekblom followed suit with his own tally three minutes later.After a slow start, the No. 23-ranked Orange (5-1, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) used those two early goals and a late one from Nick Perea to beat Cornell (2-2-1), 3-0, in front of 647 at SU Soccer Stadium on Tuesday night.After getting out to an early lead, the Orange back three buckled down and shut down the Big Red attack.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It’s a testament to our guys,” McIntyre said. “We found a way to get the result tonight.”After wide-open Cornell midfielder Tommy Griffin nearly scored early on, defenders Louis Cross and Jordan Murrell unleashed vocally on the Syracuse midfielders to find their marks. Goalkeeper Alex Bono screamed for his team to push up out of the defensive third whenever he corralled the ball.But the tide suddenly changed from a Big Red-dominated game to one that the Orange had firmly in its grasp.Ekblom took the ball to the left edge of the box before laying it off for Stamoulacatos atop the 18. He one-timed it to Pasanen, who side-footed the ball into the top left corner from 20 yards out in the 18th minute, beyond the outstretched left arm of Cornell goalie Zach Zagorski.“Amazing,” Pasanen said of his goal. “It was a great play on the left side. It was the best feeling. It’s always good to get the first goal.”A minute later, Chris Nanco came in for Stamoulacatos and immediately wreaked havoc on the Big Red back line. He dangled left defender Zach Bialik on the right flank before cutting inside and feeding Ekblom, who volleyed the ball into the bottom-right corner for his third goal of the campaign.The Big Red nearly cut the lead in half shortly after, when Bono bobbled a bouncing shot and Cornell forward Conor Goepel got a toe on it, but the ball trickled wide left to preserve the shutout.It was the closest Cornell would come, despite having a multitude of semi-chances, as Cross — in replacement of the suspended Skylar Thomas — remained steadfast in the center of the back three.“It was a bit of a shaky start, but I think we adjusted well,” Cross said. “Second half, we came out really well. We knew we had to be tighter, get the defense together a bit more, so I think we did pretty well.”Syracuse threatened to extend the lead several times early in the second half, but were unable to convert. Ekblom  beat two defenders with back-to-back spin moves in the box before hitting the left post. Oyvind Alseth beat four defenders before unleashing just wide left. Alex Halis ripped a shot that Zagorski was just able to hold onto.Bono and the back line weren’t tested nearly as much in the latter stages of the game as the Orange’s five-man midfield continued to put the Cornell defense on the back foot, virtually until  the clock hit triple-zeros.Perea added an insurance tally with just more than two minutes remaining that beat Zigorski at his near post, providing a fitting conclusion to a game that, after a shaky SU start, seemed all but decided.“This Cornell game was a tough test for us,” McIntyre said. “Now we take a deep breath for a few hours and get ready for Coach (Mike) Noonan and his talented Clemson team.” Commentslast_img read more

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