Huesca pass their way beyond Barca in La Liga feat

first_imgLa Liga debutants Huesca achieved an impressive landmark after scoring against Barcelona on Sunday.The Spanish minnows stunned the Camp Nou crowd as they raced into an early lead thanks to Cucho Hernandez’s effort.And Huesca’s strike was no ordinary goal as they put together a move which contained 19 passes en route to finding the back of Barcelona’s net. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! The 19 passes in the build-up to the goal were the most by a team in a La Liga game against Barcelona at Camp Nou since at least 2005/06.19 – There were 19 passes in the build up to Huesca’s goal in this game; the most by a team in a La Liga game against Barcelona at Camp Nou since at least 2005/06. Historic. pic.twitter.com/xYwIKriDlk — OptaJose (@OptaJose) September 2, 2018 Lionel Messi soon ended Huesca’s joy, though, as the Argentina superstar levelled the tie on the 19th-minute mark.Jorge Pulido scored an own goal to put Barcelona 2-1 in front before Luis Suarez added a third for the hosts.Huesca were not done there, though, as Alex Gallar netted a second for the visitors just before the half-time interval.But Ousmane Dembele restored Barca’s two-goal buffer with a strike after 48 minutes and Ivan Rakitic added a fifth for the hosts.There was no way back for the Aragonese outfit when Messi scored his second of the game after the hour mark, before Jordi Alba made it 7-2.And Suarez wrapped up the scoring for Barca with a strike in stoppage time.last_img read more

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Syslogic: OEM series Box PC as CAN control or IoT device

first_img Continue Reading Previous SMART Modular Technologies: N200 SATA flash family offers capacities ranging from 32GB to 1TBNext HCC Embedded signs licensing agreement with Microsoft With the Embedded Computer OEM S-81, Syslogic unveils the first device of the new OEM series (Original Equipment Manufacturer). This is a completely new development, ensuring availability for a very long time. The compact Embedded Computer OEM S-81 features various interfaces facilitating connection to different communication levels. Thanks to two standard CAN interfaces (optionally also available with six) the Box PC is perfectly suited as a CAN controller. Accordingly, the device is used for monitoring or controlling vehicles, such as forklifts, automated guided vehicles (AGVs) or special vehicles.An RS232 interface is available for connecting sensors or machines. Thanks to integrated Gigabit Ethernet interfaces and WiFi support, the Box PC can also be used as an IoT gateway, data logger or pitch controller in wind turbines. System upgrades are implemented by a Mini PCI Express interface. MicroSD or CFast cards can be connected to be used as storage media. The Embedded Computer OEM S-81 is quick and easy to put into operation. It is suitable for OEM manufacturers and system integrators who want to exploit the full potential of a smart embedded system in the IoT or CAN environment.To guarantee best user comfort and fast commissioning, Syslogic delivers its embedded computers with a preconfigured operating system. To meet a variety of requirements, various Windows or Linux versions are available. This includes the newly launched versions Windows 10 IoT Enterprise 2019 LTSC and Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS.Syslogic is one of the few European companies that develops and manufactures its own embedded systems. With the OEM computer, customers receive a quality product that meets high industrial demands. The clever fanless board design ensures high reliability and durability. Furthermore, as a manufacturer, Syslogic has the long-term availability of the OEM computer completely under control. This makes the Embedded Computer OEM S-81 a profitable long-term investment.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Boards & Modules last_img read more

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Northwest Syria clashes kill 51 fighters monitor

first_imgBeirut: Clashes between anti-government fighters and regime forces killed 51 combattants on both sides in northwestern Syria Tuesday, a war monitor said. Russia-backed regime fighters have for weeks been chipping away at the edges of the jihadist-run stronghold of Idlib — a province that borders Turkey — after bombarding it for months. But hardline rebels and jihadists on Tuesday attacked loyalist positions in the south of the bastion, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US “Violent clashes east of the town of Khan Sheikhun broke out at dawn after jihadist and opposition groups attacked regime positions,” Observatory chief Rami Abdel Rahman said. The attack was led by the Al-Qaeda-linked Hurras al-Deen group and another jihadist faction — Ansar al-Deen — he said. The fighting has killed 23 regime forces and 20 opponents, including 13 jihadists, the Observatory said. In the southeast of the bastion, eight rebels were killed trying to sneak through frontlines towards regime positions near the Abu Duhur military airport, the monitor added. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls Regime forces recaptured Khan Sheikhun last week, and have been massing north of the town in recent days as they prepare to push on with their assault. The town lies on a key highway running through Idlib province, and fully recapturing the artery would allow the government to reconnect Damascus to second city Aleppo. Heavy regime and Russian bombardment has hit areas north of Khan Sheikhun in recent days, in the vicinity of the town of Maaret al-Noman, the next stop north on the highway. On Monday, regime and Russian air strikes killed 12 civilians in the jihadist stronghold, the Observatory reported. The offensive comes despite a deal signed in September last year by Moscow and rebel backer Ankara to avert a full-blown assault on the Idlib region of some three million people. The presidents of both countries were set to meet in Moscow on Tuesday. Hayat Tahrir al-Sham — a group led by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate — extended its administrative control over the whole of Idlib in January, but other rebel factions remain present. A spike in bombardment since late April has killed more than 920 civilians, the Observatory says, and caused more than 400,000 people to flee their homes, according to the United Nations. The Syrian civil war has killed more than 370,000 people and displaced millions since starting in 2011 with the brutal repression of anti-government protests.last_img read more

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Former dean returns to Brock for retirement party

Colleen Catling and John CorlettA familiar face to Brock faculty and staff stopped by the main campus this month to say goodbye to his former executive assistant.John Corlett, who served as Dean of Applied Health Sciences from 2002 to 2010, stopped by for the retirement party of Colleen Catling, a 29-year Brock employee whose last day is tomorrow.Corlett was on his way to El Salvador to do research. He is now Vice-President Academic at the University of Winnipeg.Catling has worked as an executive assistant in Applied Health Sciences since 1997, and at Brock since 1982. Her party was in Pond Inlet on May 13.

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Liberals pour billions in to child care in political bid to win

by Jordan Press, The Canadian Press Posted Mar 22, 2017 2:30 pm MDT Last Updated Mar 22, 2017 at 6:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Liberals pour billions in to child care in political bid to win over families Copies of the federal budget are seen at the media lock-up, before being tabled by Minister of Finance Bill Morneau in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang OTTAWA – The federal government plans to spend $7 billion over the next decade to help ease the burden of child care costs, part of a slew of new long-term spending targeting families.The details outlined in Wednesday’s federal budget estimated that child care spending could create 40,000 new, subsidized daycare spaces countrywide over the next three years, representing a bump of less than 10 per cent in the overall number of spaces, although it’s unclear how the Liberals came to that figure.The budget said the money could also help thousands of parents more easily enter the labour force, particularly women, much as it did in Quebec after that province introduced a subsidized daycare system.The potential new spaces and reduced child care fees would come just in time for 2019, when the Trudeau Liberals face re-election, and build on the extra money the Liberals gave to families last year through a new child benefit. At a cost of about $23 billion a year, the income-tested child benefit eats up under 10 per cent of the federal budget.The Liberals would also have a carrot to dangle in front of families during the election as the child care funding would hover around $550 million a year for the next five years and then jump to approximately $800 million annually between 2022 and 2028. That’s about one third of what the Paul Martin Liberals promised provinces the last time the federal government made a significant foray into the child care system.“It has been a long time since we’ve seen federal leadership in this area but we are disappointed the budget is not more ambitious in its spending especially at the start of the 10-year period,” said Morna Ballantyne, executive director of the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada.Andrea Mrozek, director of the faith-based think-tank Cardus Family said the money acts as a form of “soft coercion” for families to send their children to daycare and mothers to get back to work faster than they may wish.“Rather than expanding options that increase the good for particular families, the government paints families into a corner by favouring one particular option,” she said.Exactly how the money will be spent will be subject to negotiations between federal, provincial and territorial governments and on how much the federal government wants to push the provinces on the issue of affordability, said David Macdonald, senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives who studies child care costs.Federal officials said the money could be spent on building child care centres, fee subsidies for parents, or wage subsidies for providers among other options to address the cost of child care that in some cities costs more than $20,000 a year. It’s also unclear if the money will go to for-profit or home-based day cares.NDP Leader Tom Mulcair said the budget doesn’t promise new child care spaces, only the possibility of 40,000 even though there’s a need for hundreds of thousands of spaces nationwide.The child care spending is one of several measures the Liberals are enacting as part of a push to get more women into the workforce, and politically win over families who may have lingering financial concerns about how to pay the bills.The budget extended parental leave to 18 months by spreading 12 months worth of payments over that time. And it lets expectant mothers begin claiming maternity benefits up to 12 weeks before their due date, an increase from the current eight weeks but short of the 15 weeks envisioned in a bill from Liberal MP Mark Gerretsen, which heads to committee for review starting Thursday.The budget doesn’t include dedicated leave for the second parent, something the Liberals had openly mused about doing. Nor does it increase parental leave benefits to make it easier for low-income earners to be able to afford to take leave.The parental leave measures will cost the government about $30 million a year over the next five years. Moving up the start date on the maternity benefit will cost about $8.6 million more per year over the same period.Those measures, among others, will require an increase in employment insurance premiums paid by workers and employers, starting next year.The Liberals’ second budget also expands eligibility for student loans and grants, so part-time students who support families can more easily access funding to help them enter or re-enter the workforce, at a cost of about $167 million over four years.Both measures will be in place for the 2018-2019 academic year.The budget also includes $287.2 million over three years starting next year for a pilot project to test changes to student loan and grant rules to help more adults return to school.— Follow @jpress on Twitter. read more

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Football Ohio State remains at No 6 in latest AP poll

The Buckeyes take the field prior to the Ohio State-Nebraska game on Oct. 14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorOhio State remained at No. 6 in this week’s Associated Press Top 25 Poll as the Buckeyes had an off week and all five teams ranked higher than them either won or also did not play this weekend.Penn State defeated No. 19 Michigan 42-13 Saturday night and stayed at No. 2 in the poll. The Wolverines fell out of the top 25. The Buckeyes will play host to the Nittany Lions at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Ohio Stadium.Alabama defeated Tennessee 45-7 and remained at No. 1, receiving all 61 first-place votes. Georgia remained at No. 3 following its off week. TCU and Wisconsin each picked up wins and held steady at No. 4 and No. 5, respectively, to round out the top five.Michigan State joined Ohio State, Penn State and Wisconsin in the top 25 as the Spartans were ranked No. 16 after beating Indiana 17-9.AP PollAlabama (61)Penn StateGeorgiaTCUWisconsin Ohio State Clemson Miami (Fl.)Notre DameOklahoma Oklahoma State Washington Virginia TechNorth Carolina State Washington StateMichigan State South FloridaUCFAuburn StanfordUSCWest VirginiaLSUMemphisIowa State read more

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Ohio State track sends 38 to NCAA preliminaries

Finishing in the top 12 places is the goal for almost every participant at the NCAA Division I Men’s and Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Preliminary Championship Competitions. Split into East and West regionals, the top 12 finishers in each event will qualify for that event’s 24-athlete field at the 2012 NCAA Championships. Ohio State’s track and field program will be well-represented, with 21 men and 17 women making the trip to Jacksonville, Fla., to compete in the NCAA East Regional preliminaries, which begin Thursday. OSU women’s track and field won its second consecutive Big Ten outdoor title this season. Coach Karen Dennis said she expects her team to carry momentum from their conference championship victory, but that they must be prepared for increased competition. “We have to have some confidence in our preparation, so obviously what we’ve been doing has been a key ingredient as to why we’ve been able to be successful,” Dennis said. “And right now, we also have to realize that that’s over, and where we may have been successful in the Big Ten arena, now we’re getting into the national arena. So just forget anything that you’ve done, because the stakes are higher now.” The women’s team is highlighted by senior sprinter Christina Manning, the Big Ten Track Athlete of the Year, and junior thrower Alexis Thomas, the Big Ten Field Athlete of the Year. Both athletes set school records this season, and hold No. 1 seeds in their individual events in the East regional. Manning set the school record in the 100-meter hurdles at the Jim Click Shootout on March 31 with a time of 12.68 seconds. Manning’s time ranks as the fastest in the NCAA this year. Manning finished first at prelims last season, and said she expects to defend her title. “I really feel as though I should win, and that I am going to win,” Manning said. Thomas set the school record in the hammer throw with her winning distance of 64.62 meters at the Big Ten Championships on May 11. Thomas is ranked No. 8 in the NCAA in the hammer throw. Thomas said she expects to improve upon her record this weekend. “I’ve been putting myself in a good position to throw further, so that’s what I’m expecting,” Thomas said. “I’ve really been focusing on staying consistent and building off of that throw.” Manning will also compete on OSU’s 4×100-meter relay team, which goes into the meet ranked 12th nationally. OSU’s 4×100 team, which consists of junior Nyjah Cousar, senior Jackie Dim, freshman Aisha Cavin and senior Shaniqua McGinnis, is seeded fourth. Other OSU women seeded in the top 12 include McGinnis in the 400-meter dash (10th), Cousar in the 400-meter hurdles (seventh) and senior Maggie Mullen in the hammer throw (seventh). On the men’s side, OSU finished fourth at the Big Ten Outdoor Championships. Interim coach Ed Beathea graded his team’s performance at the Big Ten meet as a “B or B-plus”, but is confident in his team heading into prelims. “I think we’re in a great spot,” Beathea said. “I think we’ve got a good number of guys that have a very good chance of advancing through if they go out and compete well.” Redshirt junior distance runner Cory Leslie holds the highest seed among the OSU men, ranked No. 2 in the East for the 3,000-meter steeplechase. With a time of 8:32.48, he is seeded only behind Michigan’s Craig Forys, who defeated Leslie in the event at Big Ten championships. Senior long jumper Mike Hartfield won the Big Ten title with a jump of 7.96 meters, which has him seeded No. 4 going into the prelims. Redshirt senior thrower Matt DeChant is seeded sixth in the shot put with a best throw of 19.38 meters, while freshman Antonio Blanks is seeded seventh in 400-meter hurdles with a time of 50.50 seconds. DeChant said that he hopes to finish higher than he is seeded. “I’d like to place top five,” DeChant said. “That’d be a great goal.” The 4×400-meter relay team, which consists of senior Thomas Murdaugh, junior Marvel Brooks, junior Korbin Smith and Blanks is seeded ninth. The 4×100-meter relay team of sophomore Demoye Bogle, freshman Timothy Faust, freshman Nick Batcha and sophomore Brandon Blackwell is seeded 13th. Other OSU men seeded in the top 12 include Murdaugh in the 400-meter dash (12th), senior Adam Green in the 3,000-meter steeplechase (10th) and Smith in the long jump (11th). The NCAA East Prelims, which are held on the campus of University of North Florida, will begin Thursday and conclude Saturday. read more

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St Leonards shooting Man 35 arrested on suspicion of murdering a mother

first_imgPolice sealed off the sceneCredit:Gareth Fuller/PA Forensics in white boiler suits and face masks worked into the night on Friday and Saturday to gather evidence from the three bedroom property behind a cordon that forced an estimated 30 families temporarily removed from their homes.Chief Superintendent Jason Taylor said: “Officers responded immediately to reports of a shooting shortly before 7:45pm.”Two women died at the scene.”Two other women, who were also at the house, were led to safety and were taken to hospital for shock.”They are being supported by specially trained officers.”A 35-year-old man, who was known to the victims, was arrested on suspicion of murder and taken into custody where he remains.”A firearm has been recovered.”Officers from the Surrey and Sussex Major Incident Team are leading the investigation, supported by local policing teams.”We are not looking for anyone else in connection with the murders but are appealing for witnesses to contact us. Police at the scene where two women were shot dead at a house in St Leonards, East Sussex  The scene of the St Leonards shooting  Police said the attack was “not a random act” and said they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the double killing.Locals described seeing armed police arrive at the scene in a 4×4, Officers clutching firearms shouted at passersby “your life is at risk”.James Butler said: “All of a sudden, police officers were shouting ‘get back, get back, your life is at risk, do not come past, turn around’.”There were police officers with guns and torches shining the light into nearby houses.”A couple of minutes later, a lady came over and asked what was going on. She was visibly taken aback by the situation, and seemed quite scared. A firearm was recovered by forensics from the sceneCredit: EDDIE MITCHELL / DAN JESSUPcenter_img “Bexhill Road remains closed at this time, and while this investigation continues I would like to thank the community for their patience.”Home Secretary and local MP Amber Rudd tweeted her condolences for the family and said:  “My thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the victims in last night’s tragic shooting incident in Bexhill Road.”I’ve spoken to the police chief and want to commend the swift actions of the police and other emergency services in responding to this incident.”I’d like to reassure residents that as the police have said, they’ve already arrested someone in connection with this tragedy.”There’s a great community spirit amongst residents of West St. Leonards which I know will continue, helping the families and friends of the victims.” “The next thing she said to me was ‘I’m going inside, I’m not staying out here, it’s not safe’.”Another neighbour who lives at the end of the street said: “I’ve lived here 20 years and I’ve never seen anything like this before.“I was just watching a film when I saw police with machine guns running past the window.” Police are questioning a 35-year-old man on suspicion of murder after a mother and daughter were shot dead in a seaside town.The two women, aged 53 and 32, were killed inside a semi-detached home in St Leonards, East Sussex, on Friday night.Two other women, including one who is pregnant, were led to safety by officers and were treated at hospital for shock.Officers were called to the house at 7.43pm on Friday. The suspect, who police said was known to the victims, was discovered hiding in a railway underpass near the house two hours later.Forensics later recovered a firearm from the scene. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Orphaned fox cubs advertised for £120 each on Facebook as charities warn

first_imgHorrified Facebook users who saw the ad begged him to take the animals to a shelter instead and eventually a woman claiming to be his daughter called a nearby wildlife centre which took the animals away to safety. Champion cage fighter Steve Dossett posted photographs of orphaned fox cubs on his social media page and asked for £120 per animal after claiming the mother had been killed on a building site. Fox cubs were advertised for sale on Facebook for £120 each as animal charities warn several other attempts have been made to sell wild animals online.center_img The RSPCA warned there was a “nasty commercial element” to Dossett’s case and the Wildlife Aid Foundation (WAF), which took the cubs in, warned…last_img

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Dean does damage to Jamalco

first_imgAlcoa announced August 22 that production at its 1.4 Mt Jamalco alumina refinery in Clarendon, Jamaica remains halted while the company assesses damage caused by Hurricane Dean. Alcoa temporarily curtailed production at the refinery last Saturday as a safety measure in advance of the hurricane. Preliminary reports indicate that the port from which Jamalco ships alumina did sustain substantial damage in the storm. The bauxite mine and refinery suffered less damage, but are not operational due to loss of power. A more complete assessment of the damages and the duration of the stoppage are being conducted.In light of the temporary shutdown of the facility, damage to the port, and likely resulting delays in shipments, the company has declared force majeure to its customers. The company says “re-start schedule, production lost and financial impact will be reported after a comprehensive assessment can be safely concluded.”Jamalco is 55% owned by Alcoa World Alumina and Chemicals and 45% owned by the Government of Jamaica. Alcoa World Alumina and Chemicals is a global alliance between Alcoa and Alumina Ltd., with Alcoa holding 60%.last_img read more

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Microsoft patches Surface in Windows RTs first Patch Tuesday

first_imgAlthough it hasn’t even been out for a month, Microsoft has already rolled out the first update for its Surface RT product. The update was introduced alongside bug fixes for other Microsoft products, like Windows 8, as part of the company’s Patch Tuesday bonanza.The firmware update includes seven patches for Windows RT, including two that were related to security issues. The rest addressed stability and performance.Something as seemingly innocuous as bunching in the Surface RT with its other Microsoft software patches is a symbolic representation of the company’s future goals. The Surface might be the company’s first ever PC and Windows RT might not be a complete version of Windows 8, but both got a quick update and the full Patch Tuesday treatment.Users can take comfort in the fact that Windows RT is going to get just as much attention as other versions of Windows, and it also seals the fact that it contains almost all the same functionality as a desktop or laptop computer, short of the ability to run non-Metro programs.The story with Surface and Windows RT was never going to be how many units it sold on launch day, but rather how Microsoft can build up the brand over the next several months to prove that it is a worthy platform.Microsoft, via The Vergelast_img read more

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Tchernobyl bientôt ouvert aux touristes

first_imgTchernobyl bientôt ouvert aux touristes ?Vous souhaitez en savoir plus sur le pire désastre nucléaire qu’ait connu la planète ? Bienvenue à la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl. Dans les années à venir, l’Ukraine prévoit de rouvrir la zone clôturée située autour du réacteur de Tchernobyl de façon à ce que les touristes en apprennent davantage sur la tragédie survenue il y a près de 25 ans.Le 26 avril 1986, le quatrième réacteur de la centrale de Tchernobyl explosait, répandant ses radiations sur l’ensemble de l’Europe du Nord. Des centaines de milliers de personnes furent contaminées par ces radiations, particulièrement intenses en Ukraine, en Biélorussie et en Russie. A l’heure actuelle, un quart de siècle plus tard, les problèmes de santé engendrés sont toujours présents.À lire aussi30 ans après, Tchernobyl se serait changée en réserve naturelle pour les animauxUne zone protégée et hautement contaminée est délimitée dans un rayon de 48 kilomètres autour du réacteur. Et aujourd’hui, 2.500 employés travaillent à proximité immédiate de l’usine. Ils construisent un nouveau bouclier de 105 mètres de haut, large de 260 mètres et long de 150 pesant 20.000 tonnes et destiné à enfermer le réacteur. Cette structure serait assez énorme pour pouvoir contenir Notre Dame de Paris ou la statue de la Liberté ! Le coût de ce projet irait de 380 à 870 millions d’euros, notamment à cause des équipements de sécurité nécessaires. Par ailleurs, plusieurs centaines de personnes évacuées sont retournées dans leurs villages situés dans la zone et ce malgré l’interdiction gouvernementale. C’est dans ce contexte que des opérateurs offrent la possibilité de visiter la zone interdite ! Le gouvernement ukrainien indique que ces visites sont illégales et que leur sécurité n’est absolument pas assurée.Mais le gouvernement est lui aussi en train d’exploiter l’idée en mettant au point des visites qui devraient être à la fois éducatives, informatives et sans danger. Pour le moment aucune date précise n’a été communiquée même si 2015 est évoqué. La porte-parole du ministère de l’Environnement indique : “Il y a des choses à voir sur place si on suit les routes officielles et si on ne quitte pas le groupe”. L’Onu soutient même l’idée expliquant que cela pourra : premièrement donner une bonne leçon concernant la sécurité nucléaire et deuxièmement rapporter pas mal d’argent. Le 14 décembre 2010 à 17:27 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Tax Administration Jamaica TAJ lauded for implementing reforms to improve compliance

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Jamaica, November 6, 2016 – Kingston – Finance and the Public Service State Minister, Hon. Fayval Williams, has lauded Tax Administration Jamaica (TAJ) for implementing reforms that have significantly improved the agency’s operations and service delivery and taxpayers’ compliance in filing statutory returns.Notable among these initiatives, she says, are the Revenue Administration Information System (RAiS) e-services platform; the creation of a single payment window for filing National Insurance Scheme (NIS), National Housing Trust (NHT) and Education Tax returns; and the establishment of customer care centres tailored to enhance the client experience.Mrs. Williams said consequent on these, tax compliance has improved significantly within recent years.   She was speaking at the TAJ’s first ever ‘Let’s Talk Tax’ discussion forum, which was held at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston on November 1 under the theme ‘Tax Compliance in Jamaica’.Meanwhile, TAJ’s Deputy Commissioner for Operations, Dave Jefferies, indicated that the agency has surpassed revenue-collection targets over the past two years, “a feat we had not achieved in the (previous) nine years”.“For 2016/17, our target was $266 billion (and) we collected $484 billion… and for the first two quarters of the 2017/18 fiscal year, we are already 8.9 per cent ahead of revenue collection. So, we are on a trajectory of surpassing another revenue target,” he said.Against this background, Mrs. Williams contended that there is much to celebrate regarding the efforts of TAJ and the overall compliance of citizens with the payment of taxes.   She commended the TAJ on its public education programme, which, she noted, was extensive and incorporated traditional media platforms such as print, radio and television as well as social media tools.   She said these have been complemented by town hall meetings, seminars and workshops, noting that TAJ has also been raising awareness about the importance of taxes, among students in school.“Representatives go in and cover topics ranging from Jamaica’s tax system, the various types of taxes, the importance of paying taxes, (to) how to start a business, and applying for a taxpayer registration number (TRN),” the State Minister said.“The thinking, according to TAJ, is that creating awareness of the tax morale and voluntary compliance from an early stage in life will eventually lead to a culture of tax compliance,” she added.The State Minister noted, however, that much work remains to be done to further increase the level of taxpayer compliance.   She said the International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimates that the compliance gap for one tax type, General Consumption Tax (GCT), from 2008 to 2013, ranged between 23 and 33 per cent of potential revenues.   This, Mrs. Williams explained, averaged between $20 billion and $28 billion annually, noting that this was a “large figure”.Additionally, she said the TAJ’s use of third-party information, specifically utilising audits and inspections to identify delinquent taxpayers, showed a $3.1-billion revenue shortfall for the 2015/16 fiscal year.   This information, the State Minister pointed out, was obtained for 724 audits conducted during the period.   The forum formed part of activities marking the TAJ’s inaugural Tax Administration Week, from October 28 to November 3, under the theme ‘Making a Difference Through Service’.Release: JISlast_img read more

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KUSIs Sasha Foo details the US asylum process

first_img Categories: California News, Local San Diego News, National & International News, Politics FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsCENTRAL AMERICA (KUSI) – The stream of 7,000 Central American migrants heading through Mexico toward the U.S. face a gauntlet of legal and administrative procedures before they can be granted asylum. University of San Diego professor Ev Meade said the process of gaining legal status under asylum is long and complex. Even after reaching the border, there is no guarantee that a person will have a chance to apply for asylum. First, the migrant must be admitted into the port of entry, and that takes place only after a pre-screening. Typical questions involve the person’s fear of remaining in their home country. Meade said, “It’s about, ‘are you in fear right now?’ A second question is, ‘are you afraid to return to your home country?’”The border issues expert said the migrant who enters a port of entry, such as San Ysidro, would have only provisional approval to stay on U.S. soil.“The United States government is allowing you to enter the United States and allowing you with the understanding that you don’t have a visa or pre-authorized entry,” Meade said.Once a person is allowed into a U.S. port of entry, they will be held in a locked cell.“You are going to be detained. They’re going to put you in something that any of us would recognize as a jail or a prison.”The next step is an extensive interview which is called the “credible fear” interview. An officer with the federal agency called the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will try to determine if the immigrant has a legitimate and well-founded fear of being persecuted in their home country on the basis of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or because of their political opinion. Meade said the definition of a refugee seeking asylum comes directly from international law. “So it’s the same standard in every country around the world,” he said.Only after the immigrant passes what’s known as the “credible fear” interview will they be permitted to start the formal process of applying for asylum and eventually plead their case in a hearing before a federal immigration judge. Because of a shortage of immigration judges and a massive backlog of cases, Meade said a person may not get an asylum hearing for two-to-five years. He said the current system is not efficient and there should be other options for those who want to apply for asylum.“The U.S. immigration system still operates almost exclusively on paper files. They don’t have a single digital system for managing all the cases,” Meade explained.The USD professor estimated that fewer than 10% of the Central American migrants heading toward the border will be allowed to apply for asylum and of that number, only 1/5 will be granted asylum in the United States. KUSI’s Sasha Foo details the US asylum process Posted: October 23, 2018 October 23, 2018 Sasha Foo Sasha Foo, last_img read more

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Police arrest suspect in attempted Hollywood Burger King robbery

first_imgHOLLYWOOD, FLA. (WSVN) – A suspected would-be robber who had attempted to hold up an elderly man at a Burger King was caught after he was scared off.The suspect was caught after police said the suspect tried to rob an elderly man inside the fast food chain in Hollywood.When the victim yelled for help, the man took off running but didn’t get far.Officials in the area, near North Federal Highway and Northeast 26th Street, arrested the crook.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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Hidden Donkey Kong 64 Coin Discovered After 17 Years

first_img Donkey Kong 64 is one of the most popular and beloved Nintendo 64 games ever released. You’d assume that every one of its secrets would have been discovered during the 17 years it has been out. However, a dedicated speed runner has managed to discover a hidden coin that no one knew about.For those who don’t know, the coins in Donkey Kong 64 can be used to buy upgrades. Rainbow coins add five coins to the inventory slot of the Kongs. Until now, it was believed that the game had a total of 976 coins. Thanks to speed runner Isotarge, we now know that it has 977.The hidden coin is found in the Fungi Forest level. The reason the coin hasn’t been discovered until now is because the game’s fifth level is covered in tall grass. Rainbow coins are hidden underneath dirt patches. To get a rainbow coin, players have to use a slam attack on the patches. However, because of the aforementioned tall grass, it is impossible to see the dirt patch on the ground.977 coins total now 🙂 pic.twitter.com/s6VYXGesck— Isotarge (@Isotarge) January 28, 2017Isotarge looked at the way Donkey Kong 64 formats its save data and found something odd. They looked at the flags in Fungi Forest and saw that the information for the rainbow coin wasn’t complete. Isotarge used analysis tools in order to find the dirt patch and discover the long-hidden coin.The discovery of this coin will have a great impact on future speed runs of the game. Those who try to get 100% during a speed run will now have to account for this coin. In fact, this discovery has now effectively made previous 100% runs invalid. This is certainly a bummer for anyone who has done a DK64 100% speed run. However, it should give speedrunners an incentive to try set new records while playing the game. Stay on target The Ultimate Super Smash Bros. Character Guide: Diddy KongThe Ultimate Super Smash Bros. Character Guide: King K. Rool last_img read more

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Embark on Your Coding Odyssey With The 2017 Complete Java Bundle

first_img Share Tweet Submit Think about some of your favorite apps and games. Chances are Java plays a huge role in the code that makes them work. The most commonly used programming language in the world, Java is a core language that any aspiring programmer has to learn about. From introduction through intermediate and then to advanced level, this complete 2017 Java Bundle will help you ace this language. Head over to Wccftech Deals and get a 95% discount on the 2017 Complete Java Bundle that brings you over 350 lessons!Save over $900 on “2017 Complete Java Bundle”Following are the seven courses that are part of this coding bundle. For more details, please visit the deals page.1- Fundamentals of Java ProgrammingTake the Introductory Steps to Learning JavaAccess 20 lectures & 4 hours of content 24/7Learn Java from scratch using the NetBeans environmentUnderstand how Java is used in creating games, messengers, image viewing, & much moreGet an introduction to Object Oriented Programming2- Intermediate & Advanced Java ProgrammingStart Building Real Apps with Java From ScratchAccess 26 lectures & 5 hours of content 24/7Receive source code for each lectureDiscuss constructors, inheritance, abstraction, & moreGet an introduction to threads in JavaBuild a real Java application from scratch3- Introduction to Java Programming for Online LearnersUse Practical Examples & Hands-On Experience to Learn JavaAccess 106 lectures & 22 hours of content 24/7Discuss Java syntax & commandsCreate variables & methodsWork with filesLearn about exception handling & creating classesExplore Object Oriented Programming basicsDiscover graphics & GUI programming4- Java for Mobile DevelopersLearn How to Build Portable Programs for Use on Desktops & MobileAccess 38 lectures & 3.5 hours of content 24/7Install & run IntelliJ IdeaDiscuss classes & objectsExplore composite types like arrays, overviews, collections, lists, & much more5- Java Interview Guide: 200+ Interview Questions and AnswersAce Any Java Programming Interview After You’ve Prepared with This CourseAccess 53 lectures & 6 hours of content 24/7Answer questions about the Java platformDiscuss how to talk about Wrapper classesUnderstand Object Oriented Programming concepts inside & outIron down your understanding of modifiers, conditions, & loopsExplore why exception handling is so importantIdentify how to answer questions about collections & generics6- The Java Programming Language Course 2017Give Yourself a Foundation In Java, Eclipse, & Object Oriented ProgrammingAccess 51 lectures & 8.5 hours of content 24/7Learn Java, Eclipse, & Object Oriented ProgrammingExplore Java Swing & inheritance in JavaDiscuss Java interfaces & anonymous classesRead & write Java to a diskDiscover Java BufferedReader class7- Java From Beginner to ExpertBecome a Java Expert, Regardless of ExperienceAccess 62 lectures & 9 hours of content 24/7Create a project, compile, & execute your first Java programLearn useful shortcuts that will cut down on your programming timeUnderstand variables, operators, conditions, arrays, loops, & moreTake a deep dive into Object Oriented ProgrammingDiscuss Lambda Expressions & generic typesOriginal value: $989 | Wccftech Deals: $49 at 95% discount last_img read more

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VIDEO ITN Editors Choice of Most Innovative Radiology Technology at RSNA 2012

first_img Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Information Technology View all 220 items ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative Radiology Technology at RSNA 2012Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:02Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:02 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. ITN Editor Dave Fornell highlights his choices for the most innovative radiology technologies and trends at Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), 2012. Choices include the first wireless ultrasound transducer, noiseless MRI, a 640-slice CT scanner and a printer than creates sculptures from 3-D datasets.Find more current news and video from RSNA Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports View all 9 items Recent Videos View all 606 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Videos | Radiology Imaging | December 14, 2012 VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative Radiology Technology at RSNA 2012 Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Women’s Health View all 62 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D. last_img read more

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NZs Marlborough wine region rattled by earthquake

first_img Posted by Travelweek Group NZ’s Marlborough wine region rattled by earthquake << Previous PostNext Post >> Thursday, December 29, 2016 center_img Tags: Earthquake, New Zealand SEDDON, NZ — A 5.5 magnitude earthquake has rattled New Zealand residents on the South Island, in the Marlborough wine region.The quake struck at 3:30 this afternoon local time and residents reported tremors as far as away as Auckland, almost 800 kilometres north from the epicentre in Seddon.A 4.8 magnitude aftershock struck at 4 p.m. local time.This is the second earthquake in as many months for the South Island. The Kaikoura earthquake shook the island with a 7.8 magnitude on Nov. 14. Sharelast_img

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