Children Receive Chemical Burns at Ind Water Park Officials

first_img Children were reportedly burned a northwestern Indiana water park–with officials updating the injury count.Porter County Health Department Administrator Keith Letta told CBS News said that the total number of children who were injured is now 44. He said that 11 children are getting treatment for burns they got at Seven Parks Waterpark Duneland in Porter, Ind.“She played in there for awhile, and we started hearing other kids crying and saying that parts of their bodies hurt and there was a mom in the bathroom saying her kid’s skin was on fire, so I pulled my daughter out of the water and she started screaming,” parent Stacy Bethel told CBS.The department ordered the park closed on Monday—just four days after it opened. Apparently, the park’s equipment malfunctioned, leading to an over-abundance of chlorine in the water.“It’s sickening to me to know that they would do something like that and risk the safety of the children,” Carey Howard said. “It’s their responsibility to make sure that those levels are OK and they clearly did not do that.Seven Peaks reportedly didn’t have an inspection or its water tested before it opened, which are both required under Indiana state law. US Children Receive Chemical Burns at Ind. Water Park: Officials By Jack Phillips June 25, 2017 Updated: June 25, 2017 Share Share this articlecenter_img Show Discussion  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Police car. (Nick Starichenko/Shutterstock) last_img read more

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Police Officer Battling Stage 4 Cancer Helps Rescue Residents From Floodwaters

first_img Police Officer Battling Stage 4 Cancer Helps Rescue Residents From Floodwaters He’s been called a heroBy NTD Television September 2, 2017 Updated: September 2, 2017 US Share this article Show Discussion Share In between chemotherapy treatments, a Houston police officer has been thanked for his heroic efforts helping with the rescue of hundreds of people trapped by the Harvey floods over the weekend.Officer Norbert Ramon, 55, is battling stage 4 metastatic colon cancer—cancer that has spread beyond the colon. He was diagnosed last March and has been undergoing chemotherapy treatment.When he saw the devastation caused by Harvey, the 24-year veteran of the Houston Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement division threw himself into serving his community despite his own health struggles.Out of concern for his health, Ramon was given desk duty three weeks ago. But on Sunday morning, Aug. 27, extensive flooding meant that Ramon was unable to report for his regular desk duty in downtown Houston.“There was so much rain and standing water,” his wife Cindy Ramon told Fox.Following protocol, Ramon notified his sergeant and then left the house to join the closest patrol unit, which was the Houston Lake Patrol Unit. “From then it was a madhouse,” Cindy Ramon told Fox. “They started going out rescuing people in all parts of Houston. That’s where it started from and it’s been nonstop.”Over the next few days as part of the Lake Patrol Unit, Ramon had a hand in helping rescue 1,500 residents from the floodwaters.“It’s just an emotional roller coaster,” his wife said of the storm. “It’s just crazy, watching everybody struggle—people lose everything.”Ramon saw what the experience meant for her husband and his cancer battle, “He’s been so caught up in the emotions and the excitement of trying to rescue people, he had no time to even think about it,” she said. “You wouldn’t even think he had cancer, he’s plugging along like he doesn’t.”On Aug. 30, Officer Ramon was notified that his flight to Oklahoma for his semimonthly chemotherapy treatment had been canceled due to problems caused by the storm. So Ramon and and his wife got in their car on Aug. 31 for a long nine-hour drive to the Cancer Center of Tulsa. The treatment center came highly recommended to the Ramons.“The people actually reached out to me, they called us and said, ‘Hey how are you guys doing, we’re seeing all the photos and we wanted to check up on you.’” Cindy Ramon said that she and her husband have been overwhelmed by the support they have received from the staff during the ordeal of the storm.Ramon’s wife shared a photo of him performing a floodwater rescue with his doctors and the staff who have been helping him with treatments, and although they were concerned for his health, they all praised him as a hero.From NTD.tv  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   last_img read more

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At Least 23 Dead Hundreds Missing as Winds Fan California Wildfires

first_img Share this article A wildfire is shown from the air near Atlas Road during an operation to rescue people trapped by wildfire in Napa, California, U.S., October 9, 2017. (California Highway Patrol/REUTERS)  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Remains of a charred safe damaged by the Nuns Fire is seen in Glen Ellen, California, Oct. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Stephen Lam)In addition to high winds, fires were stoked by an abundance of thick brush and other vegetation left tinder dry by a summer of hot, dry weather and months with little or no rainfall. The cause of the fires remained under investigation.Matt Nauman, a spokesman for the region’s main utility, Pacific Gas & Electric, acknowledged that fallen power lines were widespread during the “historic wind event,” which he said packed some hurricane-strength gusts in excess of 75 miles per hour.Fires enter record booksAt least 13 people were killed by the Tubbs fire in Sonoma County alone, officials said, two more than were reported earlier in the day. It is the deadliest single California wildfire since 2003, when the so-called Cedar fire killed 15 people in San Diego, according to state data.The latest overall death toll of 23, including six fatalities in Mendocino County and two more each in Napa and Yuba counties, marks the greatest loss of life from a California wildfire event since 25 people perished in a firestorm that swept the Oakland Hills in October 1991.The deadliest wildfire on record in California dates back to October 1933, when 29 lives were lost in the Griffith Park fire in Los Angeles.Officials identified the dead in Napa County as 100-year-old Charles Rippey and his 98-year-old wife, Sarah. His body was found outside where his wife’s bedroom once stood, their son, Mike Rippey, told local television.“He was trying to get from his room to her room,” he said. “He never made it.”Wildfires have damaged or demolished at least 13 Napa Valley wineries, a trade group for vintners there said on Tuesday. But experts say smoke rather than flames may pose a greater risk to the delicate grapes still waiting to be picked. A charred entrance to the Nicholson Vineyards and Winery damaged by the Partrick Fire is seen in Sonoma, California, Oct. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Stephen Lam) Grapes are seen on a vine charred by the Nuns Fire is seen in Glen Ellen, California, Oct. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Stephen Lam)California Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in several northern counties, as well as in Orange County in Southern California, where a fire in Anaheim destroyed 15 structures and damaged 12.Additional reporting by Stephen Lam, Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles, Jonathan Allen in New York, Dan Whitcomb in Los Angeles and Jeffrey Dastin in San Francisco.Writing by Steve Gorman, Editing by Diane Craft, Andrew Hay and Paul Tait At Least 23 Dead, Hundreds Missing as Winds Fan California Wildfires One of the deadliest in California historyBy Reuters October 12, 2017 Updated: October 12, 2017 Share US News SONOMA, California—Firefighters facing a resurgence of high winds on Wednesday struggled to halt wildfires that have killed at least 23 people, destroyed 3,500 structures and left hundreds missing in chaotic evacuations across northern California’s wine country.Nearly two dozen blazes spanning eight counties have charred around 170,000 acres. Flames erupted on Sunday night when gale force winds toppled power lines across the region, possibly igniting one of the deadliest wildfire outbreaks in California history. A residential neighborhood destroyed by the Tubbs Fire is seen along Fountaingrove Parkway in Santa Rosa. (REUTERS/Stephen Lam)Flames were spread rapidly by hot, dry “Diablo” winds – similar to Southern California’s Santa Ana winds – that blew into northern California toward the Pacific on Sunday night.The official cause of ignition has not been determined, but electric wires knocked down by those same winds may have sparked the conflagration, according to Daniel Berlant, spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.“That is definitely a possibility,” he told Reuters. “Power lines are a common cause of fires during wind events.” Berlant said some of the victims in northern California were asleep when the fast-moving fires broke out, igniting their homes before they could escape.At least 20,000 people remained under evacuation as the fires raged largely unchecked for a third day, belching palls of smoke that engulfed the region and drifted south over the San Francisco Bay area, where some residents donned face masks.The entire town of Calistoga, a Napa Valley community of some 5,000 residents spared from advancing flames the first night of the fire, was ordered to evacuate on Wednesday evening, as the county sheriff’s office warned that conditions had worsened.More than 550 people were still reported unaccounted for in Sonoma County on Wednesday morning, said Jennifer Laroque, a county emergency operations center spokeswoman.It was unclear how many of the missing might be actual fire victims rather than evacuees who merely failed to check in with authorities after fleeing their homes. Officials urged displaced residents to let their family members know they were safe.Obliterated neighborhoodsThe Sonoma County town of Santa Rosa, the largest city in the wine country region, was particularly hard hit by one of the fiercest blazes, the so-called Tubbs fire. Block after block of some neighborhoods were virtually obliterated with nothing left but charred debris, broken walls, chimneys and the steel frames of burned-out cars.“It’s like driving through a war zone,” J.J. Murphy, 22, one of thousands of evacuees, said of the area around his home in the Sonoma Valley community of Glen Ellen.Murphy, five relatives, a bird, a dog and two cats piled into their camper van to flee on Monday, he said.“It’s crazy how in just a few hours a place I’ve recognized all my life I can’t recognize,” he said at a roadside food stop in the town of Sonoma.In the town of Napa on the first night of a blaze dubbed the Atlas fire, nearly 50 people who were in danger of being overrun by flames were rescued by the crews of two California Highway Patrol helicopters working in tandem during a seven-hour aerial evacuation operation.The weather gave firefighters a bit of a respite on Tuesday as cooler temperatures, lower winds and coastal fog enabled them to make headway against the flames. Fire crews labored on Wednesday to strengthen containment lines as winds picked up again.“We’re not out of the woods and we’re not going to be out of the woods for a great number of days to come,” Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, told a news conference. A group of retired police officers works through the ruins to look for a police badge for fellow retired officer Tom Francois after his home was destroyed by the Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa. (REUTERS/Stephen Lam) Show Discussionlast_img read more

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Illegal Immigrant Indicted on Federal Charges After San Francisco Murder Acquittal

first_img WASHINGTON—A grand jury on Tuesday indicted on federal charges an illegal immigrant from Mexico who was acquitted last week of murder by a San Francisco jury, the U.S. Justice Department said in a statement.Jose Ines Garcia Zarate was indicted on charges of being a felon in possession of a firearm, and for being an illegal immigrant in possession of a firearm, the statement said.Garcia Zarate, who had been deported to Mexico five times since first entering the United States as a juvenile, was acquitted on Thursday in the killing of Kate Steinle, whose death Donald Trump used as a rallying cry against “sanctuary cities” during his presidential campaign. US News Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, arrested in connection with the July 1, 2015, shooting of Kate Steinle on a pier in San Francisco is led into the Hall of Justice for his arraignment in San Francisco, Calif., on July 7, 2015. (Michael Macor/Reuters) Illegal Immigrant Indicted on Federal Charges After San Francisco Murder Acquittal By Reuters December 6, 2017 Updated: December 6, 2017 Share this articlecenter_img  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Share Show Discussionlast_img read more

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DEA Clamps Down on Deadly Fentanyl Distribution

first_img US News Show Discussion Share Fentanyl pills and crystals sold on the street. (DEA)  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   center_img WASHINGTON—Taking further steps to slow the rate of deaths from opioids, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is placing all fentanyl-related substances under emergency Schedule I controls.Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine.The substance is manufactured primarily in China and shipped to the United States. It is being mixed with heroin or pressed into fake painkiller pills made to look like real prescription drugs. Fentanyl was originally developed for use in hospitals as a painkiller during surgeries. “In addition to the 16 fentanyl analogues that we have already sought to control, we’ve notified our Health and Human Service colleagues of our intent to place emergency Schedule I controls on the entire class of fentanyl-related substances,” said Robert Patterson, acting DEA administrator, on Nov. 29.“This scheduling action is critical … because our investigations reveal efforts by some traffickers to change the molecular structure of fentanyl in an attempt to thwart law enforcement and evade prosecution in the United States.” A photo illustration of 2 milligrams of fentanyl, a lethal dose for most people. (DEA) Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse,” according to the DEA.Examples include heroin, LSD, marijuana, ecstasy, and peyote. Most opioid prescription painkillers—such as Vicodin, Dilaudid, and OxyContin—are classified as Schedule II controlled substances. The widespread introduction of fentanyl into America’s illicit drug market has pushed overdose deaths to an all-time high. More than 64,000 Americans died of a drug overdose in 2016, according to preliminary numbers. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of death for those under the age of 50.The death toll so far in 2017 is even higher, mostly due to synthetic opioids such as fentanyl.Regulating PrescriptionsBut the opioid crisis began with prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin. Eighty percent of new heroin users start their habit with prescription opioids. When the prescription pills run out or become too expensive on the street, the new addict replaces them with heroin and, more recently, fentanyl.“It is an insidious epidemic created in large part by the over-prescribing of potent opioids,” Patterson said. “This has resulted in a new generation of opioid abusers, presently estimated at 12 million Americans.” Acting DEA Administrator Robert Patterson (L) and Attorney General Jeff Sessions announce new initiatives to help combat the opioid epidemic, at the Justice Department in Washington on Nov. 29, 2017. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)Anyone who dispenses controlled substances, such as opioid painkillers, must register for approval through the DEA, which falls under the Justice Department. Patterson said there are currently 1.7 million registrants handling prescription drugs in the United States.The DEA’s diversion control program operates to stop medical practitioners from making illicit sales of prescription pills. On Nov. 20, Dr. Robert Gene Rand in Reno, Nevada, was sentenced to 10 years in prison for involuntary manslaughter of a patient and unlawful distribution of oxycodone, according to the DEA. Previously, only long-acting opioids—about 10 percent of opioid prescriptions—were subject to strict regulation.Despite warnings by another doctor and the patient’s mother, Rand continued to prescribe oxycodone to the patient, leading to the patient’s overdose and death in October 2015, the DEA said. Rand also admitted that from March 2011 to April 2016, he prescribed a total of 23,645 oxycodone 30-milligram pills without a legitimate medical purpose to a second patient.The DEA also investigates pharmacies that fill exceptionally high numbers of oxycodone prescriptions, customers who make excessive or frequent opioid purchases, multiple customers with identical addresses, or customers traveling extreme distances to specific pharmacies despite access to more convenient options. “More recently, we’ve seen a downturn in the overall number of opioid prescriptions, but there remains more work,” Patterson said. President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency on Oct. 26. The declaration included ways to increase access to treatment and imposed stricter requirements on opioid prescriptions. Previously, only long-acting opioids—about 10 percent of opioid prescriptions—were subject to strict regulation. Recently, that was expanded to include immediate-release opioids. The new requirements will make all opioids that are manufactured subject to the same strict regulations.New Justice Department Initiatives On Nov. 29, Patterson and Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced three initiatives to help tighten the net around the illicit distribution of opioids and other drugs. In the first new plan, the Justice Department is sending more than $12 million in grants to state and local law enforcement agencies “to take heroin, methamphetamines, cocaine, and other illicit drugs off our streets,” Sessions said. He didn’t elaborate on how local law enforcement agencies would spend the money.Second, a new field division within the DEA will open in Louisville, serving Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee. The move is aimed to align DEA efforts in the Appalachian mountain region, and the new division is the first in almost 20 years.“These three states combined are problematic in the Appalachian region and very specific to the opioid crisis,” said Patterson.Third, all U.S. Attorney offices in the country must appoint an opioid coordinator, who will “convene a task force of state, federal, and local law enforcement and help determine which cases to take federal,” Sessions said.“We will not slow down for one day or even one instant. With one American dying of a drug overdose every nine minutes, enforcing our drug laws is more important than ever.” Follow Charlotte on Twitter: @charlottecuthbo Share this article DEA Clamps Down on Deadly Fentanyl Distribution But over-prescription of pills is still fueling the opioid crisisBy Charlotte Cuthbertson December 7, 2017 Updated: December 16, 2017last_img read more

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Baltimore Schools Closed Thursday After Outrage Over Frigid Classrooms

first_img Baltimore Public Schools were closed on Jan. 4, after parents and teachers complained about classrooms that had turned frigid due to plumbing and heating issues.“She actually said she couldn’t feel her feet at one point. I texted her back and said are you joking? She says—no.”That was Nikki Massie, describing a conversation with her 16-year-old daughter who attends a public magnet school in Baltimore. It’s one of Maryland’s highest-performing high schools.On Jan. 3, four schools shut down because of facilities problems, but the rest remained open despite temperatures that hovered around 40 degrees Fahrenheit inside, reported NPR.“As of now, I have on four shirts, two hoodies, and a jacket,” Frederick Douglass High School senior Dennis Morgan told the outlet. “It’s kind hard to get comfortable when you’ve got so many layers on and you’re not used to it and you’re still cold.” We had heat in the morning but it quickly went to blowing cold air. We are not in Baltimore but are in a well-respected one about 30 miles away. We stayed all day as well. It sucks all around and NO child should have to endure this at school. (Name covered to protect kiddo.) pic.twitter.com/1yJD4CH4Q5— Melissa Bickley (@TeachOrSwim) January 3, 2018  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Baltimore Schools Closed Thursday After Outrage Over Frigid Classrooms By Zachary Stieber January 4, 2018 Updated: January 4, 2018 Show Discussion A direct result of socio-economic status & public school administrators obsessed with % of students in school… https://t.co/urnVU9N5mN— melvinroach (@melvinroach) January 4, 2018 Share US  QualityAuto 1080p720p480p360p240pRewind 10 SecondsNext UpLive00:0000:0000:00ChromecastClosed CaptionsSettingsFullscreen  click to watch video From NTD.tv Follow Zachary on Twitter: @zackstieber “We are the wealthiest state in the country,” the Baltimore Democrat told the Sun, “and to think there’s any child right now, today, in this state in a school without heat is wrong and we need to fix it. Now.”While schools are closed on Thursday, they may re-open on Friday.Alison Perkins-Cohen, the chief of staff for the Baltimore City Schools, said in a Jan. 2 pdf letter to families of students and staff members that the goal is to keep schools open whenever possible.“Only when problems affect large portions or all of a building do we make the decision to close the school,” she wrote.“We want students to have every possible opportunity for teaching and learning, and we also want to make sure that students can get the services and supports that many families rely on — for example, warm meals and before and after-school care. This means that we keep school buildings open, even when conditions are sometimes less than ideal.” Recommended Video:Melania Trump’s First Year as First Lady Share this article Devery East shovels snow from his driveway in Baltimore, Maryland on Jan. 23, 2016. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images) Baltimore Teachers Union President Marietta English sent an urgent letter to the school district’s CEO, Sonja Santelises, advising her to close the schools until the heating issues were fixed.“I implore that you close schools in the District until your facilities crew has had time to properly assess and fix the heating issues within the affected schools in Baltimore City,” English wrote.“This is the best way to ensure the safety of our members and our children.”Santelises said in an address to the public that “too many of our buildings have outdated heating systems, poor insulation, and aging pipes as a result of years of inadequate funding for maintenance and facilities improvements,”  reported the Baltimore Sun.Del. Maggie McIntosh, chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, said the backlog of school repairs is an ongoing issue.last_img read more

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Florida Couples Child Taken by Indian Tribe

first_img US News Share this article The Baptist Hospital in Kendall, Fla. (Screenshot via Google Maps) Share  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   center_img Show Discussion A Florida couple has been deprived of their newborn daughter based on a questionable court order—but the legal system isn’t sure how to respond.Justin Johnson, 36, and Rebecca Sanders, 28, became parents on the morning of Friday, March 17. The baby was delivered via Caesarian section at Baptist Hospital in Kendall, Florida.Two-day-old Ingrid Ronan Johnson was healthy and happy, lying in her mother’s arms, on Sunday, March 18, when a doctor came in and took the newborn girl for what her mother assumed was a normal checkup.Instead, the doctor handed the baby to two policemen, who said, “Your baby is being taken. She is no longer in your custody. You are not the mother anymore,” Sanders told the Miami Herald.Justin Johnson and Rebecca Sanders recount the horrible story of how their child was stolen. (Miami Herald screenshot) Justin Johnson and Rebecca Sanders recount the horrible story of how their child was stolen. (Miami Herald screenshot) The police officers were from the Miccosukee Indian reservation, where Sanders was a tribal member and where she had been staying with her mother, Betty Osceola.The tribal police had an order signed by a Miccosukee judge—but that judge’s order should not have had jurisdiction outside the grounds of the reservation. And the child, Ingrid Roman, does not have enough Miccosukee blood to be a tribal member.Yet now, nearly a week later, Johnson and Sanders are still separated from their baby, and no one is saying where that child is.“I’m still trying to wrap my head around how this has happened,” Johnson told the Herald. “I can’t even begin to explain how hard this has been. I don’t see how people of the Miccosukee tribe can look me in the face and tell me this is OK.”Baptist Hospital released a statement on March 21.“We obeyed law enforcement. Baptist Hospital falls under the jurisdiction of the Miami-Dade County Police Department and complies with state and federal laws,” the hospital’s statement read. “It is our hospital’s policy to cooperate with Miami-Dade law enforcement as they enforce court orders.”It is not clear that Miami-Dade police were involved with seizing the baby. According to the Miami Herald, Miccosukee tribal police were the only law officers present, and they took the child from her mother.(Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders) (Screenshot via Miami Herald/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders)Searching for Help Down Every AvenueJohnson and Sanders have filed complaints in every venue they can find, including with Miami-Dade Police and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. They have hired a lawyer to try to get their child back.“We don’t know the health of the baby. We don’t know if she is receiving proper care,” said Fort Lauderdale attorney Bradford Cohen. He pointed out that the first few days of a baby’s life were a critical bonding time, and also that the baby would be best off being breastfed by its mother, both for health and emotional reasons.”But no one will admit to knowing where the child is or who might be caring for it.“It’s horrific,” said Miami-Dade state attorney Katherine Fernández Rundle, with whom Johnson filed a complaint on March 20. “We don’t really know what the recourse is at this point, but we will continue to review it and talk to other agencies.”Miami-Dade Police Director Juan Perez said he would launch an “immediate inquiry” into the matter. “Once we have additional information, we can determine what, if any, additional steps are necessary,” he said.So far, no answers have been forthcoming.(Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders) (Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders)A Family DisputeJohnson, 36, was a strength coach when he met Sanders, 28, a former bodybuilder. They met while Johnson was helping Sanders rehabilitate a broken arm.The pair moved to Arkansas together, and Sanders got pregnant. They returned to Miami recently so Sanders could care for an ill stepfather. They lived on the reservation with Sanders’s 11-year-old son and 12-year-old daughter, offspring from an earlier relationship.Once in Miami, the couple had to cope with Betty Osceola, Sanders’s mother, who seemed to dislike Johnson intensely. Johnson and Sanders told the Herald that Osceola couldn’t tolerate seeing her daughter with a non-Indian.Osceola got Johnson thrown off the reservation, and facing the extreme pressure, the couple decided to separate—but decided to stay close enough to co-parent. Johnson moved off the reservation; Sanders remained.Osceola drove her daughter to the hospital on the morning on March 17. Sanders insisted that Johnson be there for the birth despite her mother’s objections, and averred that Johnson would always be part of the baby’s life.Betty Osceola responded with anger. “She threatened to take my kids away. She didn’t want him there. She told security he needs to be removed,” Sanders told the Herald.The next day, hospital security did indeed remove Johnson from the room, “They had received phone calls that it would be in their best interest to have me removed,” Johnson explained—but the hospital staff would not say who had called.(Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders) (Screenshot via Miami Herald/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders)The next day, tribal police came and took the baby.In the complaint Betty Osceola filed with the Miccosukee tribal judge, the child’s grandmother claimed that both Johnson and Sanders had struck Sander’s 11-year-old son, who is autistic. Both deny the claim, and the court order signed by the judge did not accuse either parent of wrongdoing.Based on that one complaint, the judge signed a court order allowing the child to be seized.The Herald contacted former Miccosukee Police Chief Dave Ward. Though Ward is not involved with this case, he knows tribal law.Ward told the Herald that tribal court orders are not valid outside the reservation.“In my opinion, the Miccosukee officers needed to present the tribal order to a state or federal judge in Dade, who would review it and issue an order allowing Miami-Dade police to follow through with removing the baby,” he stated.(Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders) (Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders)A Territorial DisputeThe problem here is that while this seems to be a straightforward custody issue, there are complicated politics involved.The Miccosukee reservation is essentially a foreign nation within the confines of the United States. Custody battles are actually matters of international relations.If the child was on the reservation, only federal law enforcement officials could go after it. The Miami-Dade Police Department has no jurisdiction on Indian lands.Everyone is proceeding cautiously—despite the fact that the health and safety of a newborn child could be at stake.The matter should be simple enough to rectify once it finally gets into a court of law.In 2014, the Herald reported, Florida’s Supreme Court ruled that the Miccosukee court had no jurisdiction in a custody dispute between a mother, who was a tribal member, and the father who was not.A State court ruled that Miccosukee justice system, which did not allow the father to testify or the father’s lawyer to attend, did not meet minimum legal standards. The Florida Supreme Court agreed.(Miami Herald screenshot/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders) (Screenshot via Miami Herald/Courtesy Rebecca Sanders)The problem is, it could take unknown amounts of time—months, possibly years—for this case to wend its way through the legal system. And through all that time a child is being denied the love of its parents.Justin Johnson and Rebecca Saunders are outraged and frustrated—but most of all, heartbroken.Rebecca Sanders told the Herald, “I feel like I have no rights. I thought the tribe was to protect its people, not use its own rulings to control its people.”Johnson recalled the last time he saw his daughter.“I remember kissing her forehead and telling her, ‘Daddy will see you soon,’ ” Johnson said, fighting tears.“I haven’t seen my daughter since.”From NTD.tvRecommended Video: Sleepy Truck Driver Causes Multi-Vehicle Crash Florida Couple’s Child Taken by Indian Tribe By Chris Jasurek March 21, 2018 Updated: March 21, 2018last_img read more

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United Airlines Plane Makes Emergency Landing Police at the Airport

first_imgA United Airlines plane was forced to turn around on Nov. 3 after an altercation between a passenger and flight attendant turned violent. (By Kentaro Iemoto from Tokyo, Japan (United Airlines B777-200ER(N227UA)) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   A United Airlines flight from Rome to Chicago was diverted to Ireland’s Shannon Airport on Monday after a message perceived as a potential security concern was discovered on board, Irish police and airline officials said.The message made reference to a bomb on the plane, a source with knowledge of the investigation told Reuters. The 207 passengers and 11 crew members disembarked from the Boeing 767-330 at Shannon Airport at 2:15 p.m. local time, according to Jim Molloy, a representative of Ireland’s police force.The passengers of flight UA971 were in the process of being searched, he said in an emailed statement, but gave no further details about the nature of the threat.United said in a statement that the landing was due to “a potential security concern,” but declined to comment further. “After assessing the situation, our crew made the decision to divert to the nearest available airport,” it said. “Additional security screenings will be performed on all customers and baggage.” The airline said on Twitter that the flight was now canceled and would depart for Chicago on Tuesday.The U.S. government was aware of the incident and seeking to establish whether there was any violent intent behind the threat, a U.S. government source familiar with the investigation told Reuters.A second U.S. government source said similar incidents involving threatening notes found on airplanes happen about once a week.The handwriting on the note was being analyzed to see if it matched with any other such notes, which are periodically found on aircraft, one of the sources said. It was not clear whether the note was posted in the bathroom prior to takeoff or during the flight.Police were also taking handwriting samples from the passengers, the Irish Times reported. The message was found in the plane toilet, it said, without citing sources.The United jet completed its descent after jettisoning some of the fuel loaded for its transatlantic crossing, according to recordings on air traffic control site LiveATC.net.Reuters contributed to this report. Share US News center_img United Airlines Plane Makes Emergency Landing, Police at the Airport By Epoch Newsroom June 12, 2018 Updated: June 12, 2018 Watch Next:How a Traditional Spiritual Practice Changed the Lives of These PeopleThe practice has attracted tens of millions across the world and at its core are just three simple principles: truthfulness, compassion, and tolerance.  QualityAuto 1080p720p480p360p240pRewind 10 SecondsNext UpLive00:0000:0000:00ChromecastClosed CaptionsSettingsFullscreen  click to watch video Share this article Show Discussionlast_img read more

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Consumer Confidence Still High Despite Drop in June

first_img Consumer Confidence Still High Despite Drop in June Americans remain optimistic about the economy, says Conference BoardBy Emel Akan June 26, 2018 Updated: June 26, 2018 US News  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Share Show Discussioncenter_img The consumer confidence index declined slightly in June, after a solid gain the previous month, according to nonprofit association The Conference Board.The index dropped to 126.4 this month from a revised 128.8 in May.“Consumers’ assessment of present-day conditions was relatively unchanged, suggesting that the level of economic growth remains strong,” stated Lynn Franco, director of economic indicators at The Conference Board.“While expectations remain high by historical standards, the modest curtailment in optimism suggests that consumers do not foresee the economy gaining much momentum in the months ahead.”Consumers’ perception of present economic conditions was little changed this month. The percentage saying that business conditions are “good” dropped from 38.6 percent to 36.0 percent, while those stating business conditions are “bad” also declined, from 12.6 percent to 11.7 percent.Consumers’ perception of the labor market was also mixed. The percentage of respondents saying jobs are “plentiful” decreased from 42.1 percent to 40.0 percent, but the percentage of those who claim jobs are “hard to get” also dropped, from 15.6 percent to 14.9 percent. Meanwhile, the Richmond Fed manufacturing index continued to rise in June, according to results of the most recent survey.The composite manufacturing index rose from 16 in May to 20 in June, buoyed by strong shipments, new orders, and employment. Respondents also had an increase in the backlog of orders, as the index rose to its highest level of this year.Firms were optimistic in June, expecting growth to continue across most indicators.The service sector survey from the Richmond Fed also strengthened in June. The revenues index jumped from 11 in May to 21 this month. Firms also reported strong growth in demand and local business conditions as well as increased business expenditures. They expect conditions to improve further in the next six months, according to the survey.Overall, the results suggest a firm pace of growth in service-sector activity, stated Goldman Sachs. Follow Emel on Twitter: @mlakan A shopper carries a shopping bag while walking in the Union Square district in San Francisco, California, on February 27. The U.S. consumer confidence index surged to 130.80 in February, its highest level since November 2000. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Share this articlelast_img read more

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Gene Evin Atkins Identified as Suspect in Deadly Trader Joes Shooting Hostage

first_img Share this article US News At around 6:30 p.m., Atkins agreed to surrender and handcuffed himself before walking out the door. He was taken into custody.Sean Gerace, an employee, was hailed as a hero for helping employees escape the standoff. “I grabbed an emergency ladder, barricaded the hallway, grabbed a weapon, put the ladder out the window, and just tried to get the attention of a SWAT officer,” Gerace recalled, according to Fox News. Share Atkins was taken into custody at around 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, some two hours after he reportedly ran inside a Trader Joe’s in the Silver Lake neighborhood and allegedly held people hostage, according to the report. Hours before, police said that he shot his grandmother seven times and shot another woman. Then, he led police on a chase until he crashed into a light post near the Trader Joe’s. Atkins then allegedly exchanged fire with police before going into the store.In the incident, dozens of employees and shoppers were trapped inside. Atkins allowed some to leave, and other people sneaked out.“Seven of us were hiding in the back behind the bread,” Cyrani Ackerman told the LA Times. “There was a lot of shots fired.” Gene Evin Atkins Identified as Suspect in Deadly Trader Joe’s Shooting, Hostage Situation By Jack Phillips July 22, 2018 Updated: July 22, 2018  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   A 28-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of murder after shooting and killing a Trader Joe’s employee in Los Angeles.Gene Evin Atkins is being held on a $2 million bail, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the Los Angeles Times reported on Sunday. Lynne Westafer, a Trader Joe’s employee, told KCAL that she didn’t know the gunman shot his grandmother before the hostage situation unfolded. “He said he would start killing us if he didn’t get to talk to his granny,” Westafer said. “And he would start counting down from five—and that was terrifying.”Atkins is being held on $2 million bail, officials said on Sunday.center_img I’m sad to say she didn’t make it. My baby sister. My world. I appreciate the retweets and the love. Please respect my family’s privacy as we are still coming to terms with this. #TraderJoes #SilverLake— Albert Corado (@digitalurn) July 22, 2018 Melyda Corado, 27, was identified by a man who said she was his sister. “I’m sad to say she didn’t make it. My baby sister. My world,” he wrote on Twitter. Wow! Bravo to this #TraderJoes crew member Sean. He heard the shots, barricaded himself and some co-workers upstairs, grabbed the window ladder and helped many of his co-workers get out. You can see him in the picture below. #SilverLake @NBCLA pic.twitter.com/2co6JqVhCY— Kenny Holmes (@KHOLMESlive) July 22, 2018 Show Discussion Silver Lake Trader Joe’s Standoff That Left Woman Dead, Others Injured https://t.co/bApKglv3Gx Gene Evin Atkins was armed when he ran into the store 3 p.m. Saturday following a pursuit that began 1 1/2 hr before in South L.A., where he shot his grandmother & another woman— Rebecca Trotter (@RTfromIL) July 22, 2018 Suspect in Trader Joe’s shooting, hostage situation identified as Gene Evin Atkins, 28. https://t.co/V23LAERmW2— NBC Bay Area (@nbcbayarea) July 22, 2018 Police respond to a hostage situation at a Trader Joe’s store in Los Angeles, Calif., on July 21, 2018. (REUTERS/Andrew Cullen) last_img read more

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