Investigative reporter beaten up in Somaliland

first_img October 23, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Investigative reporter beaten up in Somaliland News RSF_en Follow the news on Somalia News March 2, 2021 Find out more Investigative journalist Ahmed Muuse Sakaaro was badly beaten on the morning of Wednesday 21 October in Somalia’s breakaway northwestern territory of Somaliland, by unidentified assailants who objected to his coverage of Somaliland’s government.Sakaaro, who edits the Voice of the People Magazine and is deputy chair of the Somaliland Journalists’ Association, was hospitalized with a broken nose and broken ribs after being attacked outside the magazine’s office. His assailants asked him to explain why he was so critical of Burao city mayor Mohamed Murad.Interviewed in hospital by the Somaliland Informer online newspaper, Sakaaro said he had been getting threatening phone calls for the past six months in which he was told to stop being so critical of Somaliland’s ruling Kulmiye party.Sakaaro referred to last month’s attack on a fellow reporter in Hargeisa by a mob that accused him of asking presidency minister Hersi Ali tough questions. “After the Hargeisa reporter incident, I felt it was not safe to ignore such threats and I reported them to security forces but they did absolutely nothing,” he said.“It is outrageous that the authorities did nothing to protect Sakaaro after he went to see them,” said Cléa Kahn-Sriber, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Africa desk.“Somaliland must accept its responsibilities and ensure that the press freedom guaranteed in its constitution is respected even when journalists dare criticize senior officials. We call on the Somaliland authorities to launch an immediate investigation with the aim of identifying those responsible for the attack on Sakaaro and bringing them to trial.”Sakaaro has pledged to continue his work as an investigative reporter. Nothing would stop him, he said.Somaliland declared its independence of Somalia in 1991. Although not recognized by the international community as an independent state, it has its own government and constitution, article 32 of which recognize media freedom. Conditions for journalists are nonetheless dangerous. They often threatened and are treated arbitrarily by the authorities. Help by sharing this information Organisation Receive email alerts to go furthercenter_img News SomaliaAfrica SomaliaAfrica News Radio reporter gunned on city street in central Somalia RSF and NUSOJ call for release of a journalist held in Somalia’s Puntland region RSF requests urgent adoption of moratorium on arrests of journalists February 24, 2021 Find out more January 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Mortgages Rank Third Among Consumer Complaints in Latest CFPB Snapshot

first_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Mortgages Rank Third Among Consumer Complaints in Latest CFPB Snapshot Related Articles About Author: Brian Honea Tagged with: CFPB Consumer Complaint Database Credit Reporting Agencies Mortgages  Print This Post Home / Daily Dose / Mortgages Rank Third Among Consumer Complaints in Latest CFPB Snapshot in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Previous: New Home Sales Bounce Back in July from a Disappointing June Next: Atlanta Fed Launches Online Publication Covering U.S. Economic Issues Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago August 25, 2015 1,129 Views The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago CFPB Consumer Complaint Database Credit Reporting Agencies Mortgages 2015-08-25 Brian Honea Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Mortgages were the third-most complained about financial product nationwide in July, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)’s monthly consumer complaints snapshot for July released Tuesday.As of August 1, 2015, the Bureau has handled 677,200 consumer complaints across all products in slightly more than four years of operation, according to the snapshot.In July 2015, the Bureau handled 26,704 complaints. Approximately 17 percent of those complaints in July were on mortgages (4,498), making it the third-most complained about financial product during the month. The top two categories were debt collection (8,224, or 31 percent) and credit reporting (6,696, or 25 percent). CFPB found that the top three companies receiving the most complaints for a three-month period from March to May 2015 were Equifax, Experian, and Bank of America.Mortgages have been the most complained-about financial product since the Bureau opened in July 2011, accounting for about 28 percent of all complaints (about 189,600 out of 677,200).The Bureau’s July snapshot spotlights credit reporting complaints, which CFPB has been accepting since October 2012. In less than three years, the Bureau has handled approximately 105,000 complaints related to credit reporting. Between June and July 2015, the CFPB found that the number of credit reporting complaints shot up by 56 percent, from 4,289 to 6,969.  The number of credit reporting complaints handled from May 2015 to July 2015 increased by 45 percent from the same period the prior year, according to CFPB.More than three-fourths (77 percent) of the complaints  submitted on credit reporting involved incorrect information on reports such as debts already paid or not yet due that showed up on their report and therefore negatively affected their credit scores, CFPB reported.Out of the top five most complained-about companies, three of them were credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, and Transunion). In fact, 97 percent of credit reporting complaints received from March 2015 to May 2015 were on one of those three nationwide credit reporting agencies, according to CFPB.”Whether a consumer is trying to get a mortgage, apply for a student loan, or buy a car, credit reports are fundamentally important in allowing people to access their financial goals,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said. “As we see a rise in the number of consumers complaining about this issue, the Bureau will continue to work to ensure that credit reports are fair, accurate, and readily available to all consumers.”The July snapshot highlighted complaints from the Los Angeles, California, metro area, which is the second-largest metro in the United States by population. As of August 1, 2015, the state of California has accounted for about 94,000 (14 percent) of the 677,200 consumer complaints the CFPB has handled since opening its doors in July 2011. Out of those complaints from California, 33,700 (5 percent) have come from the Los Angeles metro area.”Whether a consumer is trying to get a mortgage, apply for a student loan, or buy a car, credit reports are fundamentally important in allowing people to access their financial goal.”The CFPB found that although mortgages have been the most complained-about financial product over the four years of the Bureau’s existence, consumers in Los Angeles have submitted complaints on mortgages at a higher rate than the national average. About 35 percent of complaints the CFPB received from consumers in the Los Angeles area were mortgage-related, compared to a 28 percent nationwide average. The rates at which consumers in Los Angeles complained about credit reporting and debt collection were lower than the national averages, however. Credit reporting complaints accounted for 14 percent of those received by the Bureau from Los Angeles, compared to 16 percent nationwide; for debt collection, it was 22 percent for Los Angeles and 25 percent nationwide.The CFPB launched its consumer complaint database in July 2012. The Bureau caused some controversy when it began publishing complaint narratives in June 2015. The Five Star Institute and Black Knight Financial Services published a study in April adding more context to the consumer complaints.To view the entire CFPB monthly complaint snapshot for July, click here.Editor’s note: The Five Star Institute is the parent company of DS News and DSNews.com. Share Savelast_img read more

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Regional suburbs record double digit capital growth

first_imgREIQ CEO Antonia Mercorella“Idalia in Townsville ranks 11th on the state list and first on the Townsville LGA list,” she said. The other Townsville suburbs to make the top 68 were Rasmussen (+19.9), North Ward (+15%) and Railway Estate (+10.1%). Keyes and Co Property agent, and former Townsville City councillor, Tony Parsons, said there were suburbs doing well, and others that were still struggling, but there were positive signs in the local property market. View of Castle Hill in Townsville. Picture: Zak SimmondsTOWNSVILLE has emerged as a star performer in regional Queensland, with four suburbs recording double digit growth. REIQ has revealed the 68 suburbs that recorded double digit growth in the 12 months to June.Twenty-seven of those 68 top performing suburbs were outside of the southeast, with Townsville dominating the regional listings.REIQ CEO Antonia Mercorella said Idalia (+21.3% to $485,00 as of June) was a rapidly expanding suburb, located just 10 minutes from the Townsville CBD, and offering access to shopping centres, restaurants, beautiful landscaping around parks, lakes and the Ross River.It is dominated by older houses and luxury new homes, with properties ranging from the “low to mid $300,000s” to over $1 million. This four bedroom house at 47 Springside Terrace in Idalia is on the market for $868,000 and is listed with Keyes & CoHe said Idalia ticked a lot of boxes for families, but he was not surprised by the city’s other top suburbs with two of them “fringe suburbs” of the new stadium under construction. Blackwater (1st) +151.3%Collinsville (3rd) + 46.2%Miles (7th) +23.5%Dundowran Beach (9th) +21.5%Idalia (11th) +21.3%Rasmussen (12th) +19.9%Biloela (14th) +18.6%Burnett Heads (15th) +18.1%North Ward (24th) +15%Palm Cove (26th) +14.3% (Source: REIQ QMM report June 2018. ) *** More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoAustralian hydrofoil championships off The Strand, Townsville.Meanwhile, Cairns and Gympie had three suburbs on the list of top performers. Palm Cove was the best performer in Cairns, ranking 26th overall. Cooloola Cove in Gympie ranked 42nd, with house prices up 12 per cent to $317,500 in June 2018. In the Whitsundays region, only Collinsville, a coal town southwest of Bowen, made the list, taking out third spot overall.Ms Mercorella said Collinsville recorded an annual capital growth for houses of 46.2 per cent, taking the median sales price to $95,000 in June.Other regions reporting at least one suburb on the list were Bundaberg, Toowoomba, Banana, Charters Towers, Fraser Coast, Gladstone, Isaac, Livingstone, Mackay, Rocky, Scenic Rim, Somerset and Western Downs.“This spread of suburbs is a good indication that Queensland real estate is delivering steady sustainable growth across the board. We’re seeing growth outside the southeast corner,” Ms Mercorella said.In terms of price, the REIQ analysis found that two very different brackets dominated the list — below $350,000 and above $500,000 but below $750,000. “Eighteen top performing suburbs reported a median house price range below $350,000,” Ms Mercorella said. “Most of these suburbs are located in regional Queensland.”Similarly, 18 top performers reported an annual median house price range between $500,000 and $749,999 … 13 of these suburbs are located in the southeast corner.“Only 8 top performing suburbs reported an annual median price range above $1 million. All these suburbs are located in Brisbane, Noosa or the Sunshine Coast LGA.”*** TOP 10 PERFORMING REGIONAL QUEENSLAND SUBURBS, RANKING/1 YR CAPITAL GROWTH North Queensland Stadium under construction in September 2018 Townsville“North Ward and its proximity to The Strand speaks for itself, and Railway Estate has some of that character housing stock that many couples are keen on, those reno jobs.”As for Rasmussen, the suburb has benefited from a number of new housing estates including a Defence Housing Australia development, and the duplication of Riverway Drive. Mr Parsons said buyers could still get a bargain. last_img read more

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Rebels close in on Murdoch Division title, edge Hawks 4-3

first_imgBy The  Nelson Daily SportsTwo seasons ago the Castlegar Rebels made it to the Murdoch Division only to be swept in four games by the Nelson Leafs.There’s not much of a resemblance between the two Castlegar teams.Taylor Anderson had three points to lead the Rebels to within one game of advancing to the Kootenay Conference Final after Castlegar edged Beaver Valley 4-3 in Murdoch Division Final action Tuesday in Fruitvale.The Rebels lead the best-of-seven playoff series 3-1 and can advance to the next round with a win Thursday in the Sunflower City.The difference Tuesday was a 20-minute span from late in the first and into the second frame when Castlegar scored four consecutive goals — three on the power play — to take a 4-1 lead.Nelson Minor Hockey grad Ryon Sookro scored to cut the lead to 4-2 before the period ended.The Hawks’ leading scorer during the regular season, Sookro, added a power play goal late in the third but that would be as close as the host team would get.For the second straight game on the road the Rebels out shot the Hawks 26-14, including 12-4 in the third period. In the two games in Fruitvale, Castlegar held a 69-28 advantage.Ryan Aynsley, Stuart Walton, Anderson and Kootenay Ice affiliate player Jesse Knowler, scored for the Rebels.Tyler Collins scored 36 seconds into the game for the other Beaver Valley marker.Around the KIJHL . . . .Hewitt pulls Cats even with RidersA goal by Ryan Hewitt with nine seconds remaining in the second period proved to be the winner as Creston Valley Thunder Cats edged the Fernie Ghostriders 2-1 to even the best-of-seven Eddie Mountain Division Final at 2-2 Tuesday in Creston. Game five is Thursday in Fernie.Laslo gives Dogs series sweepKyle Laslo stopped 19 shots to power the Osoyoos Coyotes to a 5-0 victory over the Kelowna Chiefs Tuesday in Rutland. The win allows the Dogs to sweep the best-of-seven series 4-0. Grizz can stop Storm tonightDefending KIJHL champ Revelstoke Grizzlies can advance to the Okanagan Conference Final against Osoyoos with a win at home Wednesday against Kamloops Storm. The Grizz lead the series 3-1. [email protected]last_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — Nelson Leafs Bantam Reps

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs looked unstoppable during a recent Bantam Rep Tournament in Osoyoos. The Reps ran the table to capture the tournament title Sunday in the South Okanagan City. Staff and management at Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to congratulate the Bantams with Team of the Week honours. The team includes, back row, L-R, coach Brent Petrick, Carson Arcuri, assistant coach Kyle Mace, Logan Mengler, Keaton Roch, Amit Bhabra, Austin Tambellini, Matthew Brind’Amour, Aigne McGeady-Bruce and Trainer Chuck Brind’Amour. Middle, Justin Podgorenko, Logan Hascarl, Bryce Twible, Nolan Renwick, Everitt Hicks, Nolan Percival, Sawyer Hunt, Jayden Maida and Jacob Shukin. Front, goalie Jesse Beauvais. Missing, goalie Greg Markholm and Micah May.last_img

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Jones tops Ted Allen’s Jewellery Low Net Tournament title

first_imgCathie McLaren, with a 76, edged out Bev Stevens for fourth spot by retrogression with Michell Palm finishing sixth at 77. Veronica Jones fired a net 69 to run away with the top prize at the Ted Allen’s Jewellery Low Net Tournament held recently at the Granite Pointe at Nelson course.Jones edged out Lorna Maxwell and Dorthy Garland for the winner’s trophy. Both Maxwell and Garland finished the day with scores of 75.last_img

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Humboldt Crabs get up big early, hang on late to claim win over Solano Mudcats

first_imgARCATA >> Through four innings of their 8-7 Fourth of July win on Monday, everything was coming up aces for the Humboldt Crabs.But for the second straight day and thanks to a couple of loud cracks of the bat, Humboldt saw its opposition put up virtually all of its run in one single inning.Luckily for the Crabs, relief pitcher Justin Watland was there to put out the fire when his team desperately needed it.Watland threw 2 1/3 shutout innings out of the bullpen to keep the Mudcats at bay and …last_img

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Winter Plant’s Thermostat Keeps It Cozy As a Skunk

first_imgSkunk cabbage.  Pew.  Do you like the meditative name “Zen plant” better?  Well, meditate on how this amazing plant keeps warm while it emerges through the last snows of winter.  Skunk cabbage is one of two plants known to regulate its body temperature.  Science Now reported on research by Japanese scientists who studied its thermostat. First, they tracked the spadix [central stalk] temperatures of two wild populations of skunk cabbage over time and compared them to the air temperature.  After making sure the fluctuations were not just random noise, the team determined that the plant used only two or three pieces of information, or variables, to regulate its internal temperature.  That meant the plant‘s thermostat had to follow a fairly simple rule, perhaps like the oven in your kitchen.  If a high-end oven gets too hot, it turns itself off; it may also track how fast its temperature is rising or falling and the temperature of the kitchen outside, making adjustments accordingly.The photo caption calls the skunk cabbage “Nature’s Oven” and states, “Skunk cabbage uses a simple mathematical formula to keep itself warm.”  The article admired the research, but said a bigger question remains: finding how these two or three variables work at the molecular level.Plants are better at math than some scientists.  Even if we uncover the mechanism in detail, it would beg the question of how this ability got there in the first place.  Scientists who don’t want to think about that could at least work on emulating the clean, efficient source of energy derived from sunshine, air and water.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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The Creation of Evolutionism

first_imgA press release titled “The Evolution of Creationism” in a geology journal is just asking for a spoof.The Geological Society of America (GSA) posted the following press release on its publication, GSA Today:Throughout history, people have sought to understand how the world came to be and how it has changed over time. This curiosity has produced a rich legacy of science and philosophy and impacted and influenced religion and theology. In the November 2012 issue of GSA Today, David Montgomery of the University of Washington examines both the history of geology and of biblical views regarding Earth’s origins.Montgomery’s main premise is that throughout most of the past several hundred years, scientists and theologians engaged in extensive collaboration regarding issues like Earth’s age and origin. The common bond that sustained this rich exchange of ideas was a respect for reason and a trust in the scientific process.As modern science evolved, so did many shared questions and struggles regarding how to best understand Earth’s age as well as how new scientific findings harmonized with or conflicted with theological understanding as conveyed in works such as the Bible. These questions and struggles persist into the present, most notably in geology, where vast differences in the answers to such fundamental questions as “how old is this planet?” both correlate and contrast with some religious beliefs.In terms of Christian theology, the main problems that Montgomery discusses are Earth’s age and the role of a global flood (“Noah’s flood”) in geological history. While these issues—that the Earth is not over four billion years old, but is actually only a few thousand years old, and that most of the geological history recorded by rocks was formed as a result of Noah’s flood—are commonly raised by modern-day creationists, they have also been vigorously studied by both scientists and theologians over the past several hundred years.Montgomery shows that geologists have provided a vast array of evidence that refutes both a young age for Earth and a worldwide flood. These conclusions provoked significant debate among Christian writers during the early 1800s, but many acknowledged the validity of the scientific evidence. They subsequently adapted their view of creation as spelled out in the Bible, recognizing that it might be figurative instead of literal, and that Noah’s flood was likely a regional event that involved the Caspian or Black Sea.Modern-day creationism, according to Montgomery, developed from several influential efforts, beginning in the 1920s. The movement would revive the global (Noah’s) flood explanation for the geological record, resurrecting the older theory mainly in an effort to question scientific conclusions regarding the biological evolution of life on Earth.The creationists of the twentieth century—and those of today—evolved in order to reject a scientific basis for understanding of the history of our planet. They instead rely on a literal interpretation of Biblical accounts of creation.These arguments are effective. Montgomery points out that more than 40% of Americans believe Earth is less than 10,000 years old, despite overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary. However, Montgomery hopes that by pointing to our longer-term history and mutual heritage of using scientific observations of the natural world to inform both secular and religious understanding, the relationship between science and religion can undergo further evolution, and faith in science can be restored.The press release was reproduced uncritically by PhysOrg and Science Daily.  The full article by Montgomery on GSA Today is open access.  See also the 8/14/2012 entry, “Rock’s Don’t Lie but Liars Rock.”This is what happens with one-party rule.  Instead of debate and reasoned discussion, you get one-sided rewritings of history.  The following shows how creationists might write the press release if they had influence at GSA:The Creation of Evolutionism [parody]Throughout history, people have offered thanks to God for the beauty of the world He created. This gratefulness has produced a rich legacy of religion and theology and impacted and influenced philosophy and science. In the November 2012 issue of CSA Today, Daniel Monotheist of the University of St. Paul examines both the Christian root of science and of materialistic views regarding Earth’s origins.Monotheist’s main premise is that throughout most of the past two thousand years, Biblical scholars and natural philosophers engaged in extensive collaboration regarding issues like Earth’s origin and age. The common bond that sustained this rich exchange of ideas was a respect for God-given reason and a respect for God’s Word.  This led to the rise of modern science, with stalwarts like Kepler, Newton and Boyle as shining lights.But as historical science degenerated in the last 230 years into atheism and skepticism, so did the rich legacy of scholarship, as skeptics struggled to re-interpret what was clearly evident in the world’s design.  They set out to rewrite Earth’s age in slow-and-gradual terms, and interpreted new scientific findings to harmonize with their unbelief.  Their motivation was to disparage the Bible, particularly the revelations given to Moses, and substitute their own speculations and call it science. These struggles persist into the present, most notably in geology, where vast differences in the speculations about such fundamental questions as “how old is this planet?” are used as weapons against some Biblical teachings.In terms of naturalist philosophy, the main targets of the new skeptics are Earth’s age and the role of a global flood (“Noah’s flood”) in geological history. While these issues—that the Earth is not over four billion years old, but is actually only a few thousand years old, and that most of the geological history recorded by rocks was formed as a result of Noah’s flood—are commonly mocked by modern-day evolutionists, they have also been vigorously defended by natural philosophers and theologians over the past two thousand years, but especially by modern theistic geologists who find overwhelming evidence for catastrophic deposition in the vast extent of flood-deposited strata and the explosive appearance of life in the fossil record.Monotheist shows that these Christian geologists have provided a vast array of evidence that defends both a young age for Earth and a worldwide flood. These conclusions provoked significant debate among Christian writers during the early 1800s, but many acknowledged the validity of the scientific evidence. Skeptics, however, subsequently adapted their view of geology as required by naturalistic philosophy, recognizing that the strata still might be interpreted in slow-and-gradual terms, using copious amounts of imagination and dogmatic adherence to naturalistic assumptions.Modern-day evolutionism, according to Monotheist, developed from several influential skeptics of the Bible, beginning in the 1780s, such as Buffon, Hutton and Lyell. The movement chose to reject the global (Noah’s) flood explanation for the geological record, resurrecting old anti-Biblical skepticism mainly in an effort to reinterpret the observations into a story about the biological evolution of life on Earth.  In this they were unwittingly fulfilling Peter’s prophecy that in the last days mockers would deny creation and the Flood.The hard-core evolutionists of the twentieth century—and those of today—gathered together into societies such as the Geological Society of America in order to reject a Biblical basis for understanding of the history of our planet. They instead rely on a literal interpretation of the words of Charles Darwin.These arguments are effective. Monotheist points out all the public schools teach that the earth is 4.5 billion years old, despite overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary. However, Monotheist hopes that by pointing to our longer-term history and mutual heritage of using scientific observations of the natural world to illuminate Biblical understanding, and with increasing exposure of the evidence supporting catastrophism that comports with Biblical history, the relationship between science and religion can undergo further mutual reinforcement, and a return to true science can be restored. (Visited 26 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Geocaching in the News – A Story Worth Telling

first_img SharePrint RelatedGeocaching HQ Says Geocaching without Speaking a WordMay 11, 2015In “Community”Geocaching, the Gift of FriendshipMarch 11, 2013In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”Your Geocaching Community Awaits…August 5, 2013In “Geocaching.com Videos” Alaska Airlines article (click to read)Geocachers grab headlines around the world as Ambassadors of Adventure, Everyday Explorers or just those people doing that new outdoor tech thing. While geocaching is not new to us, more and more people are seeing geocaching in the news and in TV shows.Geocaching Co-Founder Bryan Roth speaks to the Swiss Magazine The Gentlemen’s Club. (click to read p33)You’re part of an emerging hobby that gets people outside and into adventure. Geocachers are a global band of tech-guided explorers some five million strong. Sometimes the geocaching adventure is just around the corner, other times the hunt delivers geocachers to the top of a mountain. But people always love to hear about the geocaching journey, especially in the media.In the past weeks and months, geocaching has appeared in publications around the globe. Geocaching was featured as a tool to see and experience the world in a new way in the USAToday video, “Want a modern day treasure hunt? Go geocaching.” Geocaching Co-Founder Bryan Roth helped Swiss readers of the magazine The Gentleman’s Guide (p.33) learn more about the addictive hobby. A police officer, who’s also a geocacher, used the Geocaching app to help find a lost hiker. The story made national news in the United States. Even airline passengers are reading about geocaching in the Alaska Airlines Magazine.USAToday video of Geocaching (click to watch)Geocaching delivers something most technologies cannot – and it’s worth writing about. Geocaching takes people outside to connect with each other. Every time you sign a log book or replace a geocache where you just found it, you’re adding to the story of that location. You connect to a community with each geocache you find. You also care for the environment along the way. It’s a newspaper article or television story that never gets old.You can continue reading too. You can always find geocaching in the news through this link.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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