Are you speaking the right language to your members?

first_imgDuring the opening session of the CUNA Governmental Affairs Conference on Monday, March 11, Executive Director of the Foundation, Gigi Hyland, took the stage. She started out by demonstrating the power of our language when it comes to greetings – how East-coasters might greet one another with a “how ah ya?”; how those from Hawaii say “aloha”; millennials and their use of emojis; etc. This topic of language and how it’s relative and specific to different states, regions and countries applies not only to our verbal dialect, but also relates to how we “speak” to our credit union members. Are we really speaking the language of our members? This means, are you sure that the products and services that you are providing for your members are really aligning with their needs? A great example of this was demonstrated by a map of the D.C area and the life expectancy of those living in downtown Washington, DC versus those living just 20 miles away. These numbers were different from each other by seven years. Why?Those living within the city had a lower life expectancy because many people have less access to affordable housing, food, and financial services. We know that when people are struggling financially, this doesn’t just impact their wallets but their mental and physical health as well.Speaking the language of our members means knowing where they are in life and understanding that financial health is related to physical health – and it’s crucial that we start making this connection to find solutions. The Foundation is a catalyst for change in the credit union movement by igniting understanding around financial health and finding those solutions. Coming up in April, the Foundation, BALANCE and the California and Nevada Credit Union Leagues will be jointly hosting the CU FINHEALTH19 Conference. This conference brings together leading experts in the field for engaging and interactive discussions on the topics of member financial health.This conference is a great way to connect with others who are focusing in on member financial health, as well as an opportunity to learn strategies, tactics and measurable ways to better serve your most valuable asset – your members. The Foundation also has a whitepaper entitled, “Health and Financial Well-Being: Two Things That Go Better Together”.We hope to see you at CU FINHEALTH next month so we can continue working on speaking the right language to improve member financial health! 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lacey Yasick Lacey is the Communications Manager for the National Credit Union Foundation. She works to develop and execute all communication efforts that support the Foundation’s national programs and engagement strategy.Lacey … Web: www.ncuf.coop Detailslast_img read more

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Heavy rain in western Maharashtra fills up dams, boosts water stocks

first_imgHeavy rains continued to pummel western Maharashtra through the day on Wednesday, affecting traffic in Kolhapur, Sangli and parts of Pune city.Incessant rain in the past 72 hours have resulted in the four major dams in Pune district — Khadakwasla, Panshet, Varasgaon and Temghar — filling up to 75% of their storage capacity.The dams collectively have a storage capacity of 29.15 TMC. The total storage till Tuesday morning was 22.59 TMC and continued to increase due to rainfall in the catchment areas.Discharge of excess water from the Khadkwasla dam resulted in the submergence of the Bhide bridge on Tuesday, leading to traffic snarls on several arterial roads.It continued to rain steadily over the city on Wednesday as well, though with less intensity.Pune has already received surplus rainfall barely two months into the monsoon, recording 561.8 mm till Tuesday morning and exceeding the normal rainfall figure of 545.7 mm for this period, said Dr. Anupam Kashyapi, Head, Weather & Air Pollution Monitoring Unit, India Meteorological Department.“The city is expected to receive moderate rainfall on Thursday while the showers are expected to reduce partially by the end of the week. However, heavy rains are expected to resume in the State from August 3 and is likely to prevail till August 6,” Dr. Kashyapi told The Hindu.He further said that Maharashtra had already received a surplus rainfall of 7% despite the deficiency in the arid Marathwada region. “The Konkan region and Goa have recorded an excess of 26%, while central Maharashtra has recorded an excess of 28% rainfall. Steady rains in Gadchiroli and Nagpur over the past 24 hours and other parts of the usually parched Vidarbha region have brought the deficit down to 19% from 29% [for Vidarbha],” said Dr. Kashyapi.However, despite these positives, Marathwada continues to be problematic with the rainfall deficit figure down to 27% from 30%.“While Beed, Nanded, Hingoli and some other parts in Marathwada have been receiving steady rain, we fear that the deficit will persist for a while. However, there are signs that the rainfall will pick up after August 8,” he said.Meanwhile, with districts in the verdant Konkan belt being relentlessly buffeted by showers, dams in Ratnagiri district have filled up to 99% of their total capacity.Heavy showers continued to lash Sangli and Kolhapur in the western part of the State, with several parts of Shirol tehsil in the latter district, notably Nrusinhawadi, submerged by water.The relentless rain prompted the opening of three sluice gates of the Radhanagari dam in Kolhapur, long filled to its capacity of 8.36 TMC (thousand million cubic feet), leading to the Panchganaga river crossing the danger mark. The rain completely disrupted traffic between tehsils and villages along the Kolhapur-Panhala route.High alert has been sounded by district authorities to vulnerable villages in the Kolhapur, Sangli and Satara districts along the banks of the Krishna.Heavy rains in Satara and Sangli districts have ensured a healthy water stock in dams in these areas. The Koyna dam in Satara has filled up to 74.89 TMC of its 105 TMC capacity, said district water resources department officials.last_img read more

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Kapil Dev turns 59: The captain who brought about a revolution in Indian cricket

first_imgOctober 16, 1978 is a date which will forever be remembered as the day one of the greatest all-rounder’s in the history of cricket made his debut.It was the day 19-year-old Kapil Dev made his Test debut against arch-rivals Pakistan at Faisalabad. India managed to draw the Test match with Kapil scoring just 8 runs and picking just 1 wicket in the game.40 years later as Kapil turns 59 today, the world remembers the Haryana Hurricane as the captain who changed the face of Indian cricket forever.Kapil went on to represent India in 131 Test matches over a career spanning 16 years during which time he picked up 434 wickets at an average of 29.64 with 23 five-wicket hauls.He currently holds the 7th spot on the list of most Test wickets but for almost 6 years he held the top spot before being surpassed by legendary West Indies fast bowler Courtney Walsh in March 2000.With the ball, Kapil is known for his lethal outswingers, which left the right handers rooted to their crease.He was a game-changer with the bat as well and had the skills to change the game’s momentum at any given time with his aggressive batting.Fielding wise, the decorated all-rounder was extremely athletic, giving his all to each ball.Kapil scored 5248 runs in Test cricket at an impressive average of 31.05 with 8 hundreds and 27 fifties.His hard-hitting abilities was on full display in one-day internationals as well where he slammed 3783 runs in 225 matches at 23.79 with one hundred and 14 half-centuries. He also took 253 wickets at 27.45 with one five-for.advertisementThe only hundred he scored in ODIs was probably the innings which defined Kapil the batsman.It came against Zimbabwe in the 1983 World Cup at Tunbridge Wells. Kapil walked in the middle with India tottering at 9 for 4 with the semi-final spot on the line.Kapil batted with the tail, scoring runs at a fair clip but also batted with caution and smashed an unbeaten 175 off 138 balls with 16 boundaries and 6 sixes. His knock powered India to 266 for 8 in 60 overs.Reuters PhotoWith momentum on their side, India rode on a superb bowling performances from Madan Lal (3/42), Roger Binny (2/45) and Kapil (1/32) himself to bowl out Zimbabwe for 235.Former skipper and Kapil’s teammate Sunil Gavaskar himself described that knock as the greatest he has ever seen in a World Cup.”When you had lost half of your side with less than 20 runs on the board, obviously it was not looking good. But this gentleman (Kapil Dev) went out and played his innings. Best innings I had seen in limited overs international.””That 175 has to be in my view the greatest knock in the World Cup,” Gavaskar said.India then went on to defeat Australia and hosts England in the next two games and booked a berth in the final alongside the mighty West Indies.The summit clash at Lord’s was a classic David vs Goliath battle with two-time champions West Indies facing India, who were playing their first final.India posted a paltry 183 but an inspired bowling performance from Mohinder Amarnath (3/12), Madan Lal (3/31) and Balwinder Sandhu (2/32) saw them bowl out West Indies for 140 triggering massive celebrations at the home of cricket.Kapil lifted the World Cup trophy on the Lord’s balcony and started a revolution in Indian cricket.Last year in January, Kapil was inducted into the Legends Club ‘Hall of Fame’ in presence of former India captains Ajit Wadekar, Gavaskar and Nari Contractor at the Cricket Club of India.Tests – 5,248 runs, 434 wicketsODIs – 3,783 runs, 253 wicketsHappy Birthday to India’s 1983 @cricketworldcup winning captain, and one of the game’s greatest ever all rounders, @therealkapildev! pic.twitter.com/fk1uNQJmzS- ICC (@ICC) January 6, 2018Accepting the honour, the Haryana Hurricane said, “There is nobody in this country who do not want to be Sunil Gavaskar. For Sunil, was he best in the best in the game, no, he was best for the game.”Lot of people will come in, but this name (Sunil) will remain on the top. We had a passion for the game and were not looking for rewards and awards, anything. At that time we had so much of passion. With our success, if people get happiness, you feel proud about it. Now I feel, cricket has changed (and) it feels so nice,” said Kapil.”I was not technically correct, but we had no one to teach. In Mumbai, there were a lot of teachers. When we played cricket, there were no turf wickets in Chandigarh, what was there is passion,” he remembered.last_img read more

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A Roof Overhead Overcrowded and getting worse Nunavuts housing crisis

first_imgKent Driscoll APTN National NewsWhen you ask Iqaluit’s Joamie Lyta to explain just how many people live in her small apartment, she needs to stop and count on her fingers.“Let me count, there’s me, him, my son, my granddaughter, my grandson, my other granddaughter, my nephew, my other son. There’s nine of us,” explained the social housing resident in Iqaluit.Nine in the day time. At night she often adds two more to her over crowded home.“My other two brothers, they come to, to sleep at my house, they got no place to stay,” she said. “So sometimes there’s 11 or 12 in my house.”It sounds extreme, but for Nunavut, this isn’t the exception, it is the rule.Fifty per cent of all homes in Nunavut are social housing – homes with subsidized rent for people who can’t afford it. Of those social units, 63 per cent are in need of major repairs.The wait list to get into those beat up homes is long. One in five of all Nunavut residents are on a waiting list for social housing. And just like Lyta’s home, one in three Nunavut homes house someone who would otherwise be homeless.The unit next to Lyta’s caught on fire, forcing her and her entire family to evacuate. Luckily for them, they were placed in another social housing unit. Until she got the good news, she wasn’t sure what she was going to do.“I was gonna cry, I guess. Or look for a place to stay a while. They gave this house to me, I was so happy, I was crying when they gave it to me,” said Lyta.Why does she do it? Why does she take in so many? She was raised that way. “My Mom taught me, when I was a little girl, to take care of them. To make sure you take care of them, or if they don’t have a place to stay. So I do,” she said.Iqaluit has two realities. Up on the hills overlooking the Nunavut capital, there are private homes that start at $500,000 and can go as high as $900,000. Closer to the downtown, social housing.That difference isn’t lost on Iqaluit’s mayor, Madeleine Redfern.“There is definitely a disparity, even in Iqaluit,” said Redfern. “We need more than social housing. Don’t get me wrong, there are over 250 families in Iqaluit alone on the waiting list for social housing. Those are the types of pressures we’re dealing with.”The Government of Nunavut is scheduled to build 202 housing units over the next two years, in 16 of Nunavut’s communities. Just to get caught up to the current wait list, you would have to build 3,580 homes for 10,500 people.Nunavut’s Housing Minister George Kuksuk turned down APTN’s request for an interview for this story. His staff said the minister was too busy.Redfern said she sees how that backlog and wait feeds into all of Nunavut’s numerous medical and social problems.“It adds to not only pressure for food security, but, school attendance, health issues, there are tremendous other costs because they don’t have enough housing,” she said. “It is a lot of money the government is spending on those other costs, whether it is to deal with health issues,or people who get into trouble with the law, because they’re hurting themselves or their family because they’re in that pressure cooker situation.”Of the 202 homes scheduled to be built over the next two years, 17 of them will not be for social housing, they will be for Government of Nunavut staff housing, usually for people brought in from the south for a specific job.That has the President of Nunavut Tunngavik incorporated (NTI), the group that represents 85 per cent of Nunavut residents who are Inuit, wondering aloud.Aluki Kotierk said that the 85 per cent doesn’t do nearly as well as the remaining 15 per cent.Average income for an Inuit family in Nunavut is just $20,000 a year. For a non-Inuit family, $85,000.“Ninety-nine per cent of the houses in social housing, the tenants are Inuit. Staff housing units are held by non-Inuit. Many of the homes, we hear in the Legislative Assembly, are held vacant, (for jobs) that are to be filled, most often by non-Inuit. Given out great need for Inuit to have housing, one would think that those houses could be built as social housing,” said Koterik.Kotierk sees some hope. There are Inuit who, with training, could build those homes. By getting paid to build those homes, they could afford to live in them. The missing ingredient is training.“I’m starting to become of the view, very much, that the money we invest in Nunavut has to be invested in the people of Nunavut,” said Kotierk. “I think that’s the same for many of the issues we face in Nunavut.”NTI will get their chance to push that trades training. They are sitting on $175 million from a lawsuit against the federal government for not implementing the Nunavut Land Claim. The money came from an out of court settlement, and is earmarked for training.They are facing a ticking time bomb in Nunavut’s demographics. Nunavut has Canada’s youngest and fastest growing population, and many of those young people are already living in a home with three generations. When those kids are having kids, will there be homes for them, or will the cycle [email protected] @kentdriscolllast_img read more

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Beaches TCI employee wins Ultimate Team member for Sandals Resorts

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 03 Nov 2015 – The ultimate team member prize at Sandals Resorts International has been awarded to Turks and Caicos staffer, Maxine Salmon of Beaches Resort Villages and Spa. Out of 27 nominees, Salmon was chosen as crème de la crème and it was explained that she embodies the excellence, the Sandals group encourages. Salmon works in the Kids Camp at Beaches TCI, and in the report it explains that Maxine ensures all children in her care at Camp Sesame Street have an amazing experience. Adam Stewart, CEO of SRI said, “The amazing things we achieved in 2014 were not achieved by luck or coincidence; they were achieved through the determination, dedication, skills, and talents of an incomparable team of stars.” Maxine Salmon walked away last week with several prizes including $2,500, an overseas trip with transportation via private jet, the ultimate team member of the year trophy and a framed citation. The ceremony was held at Sandals Ochi Beach Resort in Jamaica. Sandals drops major bomb, makes Misick brothers look terribly suspect Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Related Items:ada, beaches resort and spa, maxine salmon, sandals resorts international, stewart, ultimate team member Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp PNP Party says it led wooden pier removal by Beaches Recommended for youlast_img read more

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KUSIs Sasha Foo details the US asylum process

first_img Categories: California News, Local San Diego News, National & International News, Politics FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsCENTRAL AMERICA (KUSI) – The stream of 7,000 Central American migrants heading through Mexico toward the U.S. face a gauntlet of legal and administrative procedures before they can be granted asylum. University of San Diego professor Ev Meade said the process of gaining legal status under asylum is long and complex. Even after reaching the border, there is no guarantee that a person will have a chance to apply for asylum. First, the migrant must be admitted into the port of entry, and that takes place only after a pre-screening. Typical questions involve the person’s fear of remaining in their home country. Meade said, “It’s about, ‘are you in fear right now?’ A second question is, ‘are you afraid to return to your home country?’”The border issues expert said the migrant who enters a port of entry, such as San Ysidro, would have only provisional approval to stay on U.S. soil.“The United States government is allowing you to enter the United States and allowing you with the understanding that you don’t have a visa or pre-authorized entry,” Meade said.Once a person is allowed into a U.S. port of entry, they will be held in a locked cell.“You are going to be detained. They’re going to put you in something that any of us would recognize as a jail or a prison.”The next step is an extensive interview which is called the “credible fear” interview. An officer with the federal agency called the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will try to determine if the immigrant has a legitimate and well-founded fear of being persecuted in their home country on the basis of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or because of their political opinion. Meade said the definition of a refugee seeking asylum comes directly from international law. “So it’s the same standard in every country around the world,” he said.Only after the immigrant passes what’s known as the “credible fear” interview will they be permitted to start the formal process of applying for asylum and eventually plead their case in a hearing before a federal immigration judge. Because of a shortage of immigration judges and a massive backlog of cases, Meade said a person may not get an asylum hearing for two-to-five years. He said the current system is not efficient and there should be other options for those who want to apply for asylum.“The U.S. immigration system still operates almost exclusively on paper files. They don’t have a single digital system for managing all the cases,” Meade explained.The USD professor estimated that fewer than 10% of the Central American migrants heading toward the border will be allowed to apply for asylum and of that number, only 1/5 will be granted asylum in the United States. KUSI’s Sasha Foo details the US asylum process Posted: October 23, 2018 October 23, 2018 Sasha Foo Sasha Foo, last_img read more

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