Wanted new economy recruits

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Hundredsof dot-commers from failed start-ups are flooding the employment market. Butcan these creative individuals be integrated successfully within traditionalorganisations? Asks Liz Simpson Haveyou ever wondered why some pioneering entrepreneurs leave the companies theyfounded when the business reaches a certain size? In some cases, they recognisethat their success at managing a handful of highly motivated mavericks isgreater than their ability to guide a bigger, more diverse workforce. But oftenit’s because the passion of those early days evaporates when the balancebetween thinking up great ideas and running a business tips more and moretowards the latter. Such founders don’t want to run an established company,just to grow one.Inhis book, Accidental Empires, about the personalities of Silicon Valley, authorRobert X Cringely compares the different approaches to working life to those ofvarious kinds of military personnel. Start-up personalities, including mostdot-com entrepreneurs, are like commandos – “young guns” who love towork hard and fast, and whose creativity in dealing with unexpected situationsoften comes at the expense of professionalism. When there’s a beachhead to beconquered, or a new market to storm, you can’t do better.Comparethem with the kind of individuals an army needs when it already has anestablished presence and requires people to hold that territory. Certainly theywon’t be able to do that with a bunch of livewires who baulk at the idea ofrules, regulations and processes. Themost valuable personalities in this context are the military police. Unlike thecommandos, these types dislike too much change, operate best when there’s astructure to adhere to and are looking primarily for security and stability,not excitement and danger. Rather like the majority of employees in later-stagebusinesses, in fact.Nowconsider what’s happening as many dot-commers from failed start-ups areflooding the employment market. In the past the question on everyone’s lipswas: “How can start-ups, run by young and relatively inexperiencedindividuals, take on someone with experience in a larger, more structuredbusiness – given that each represents a different culture?” Today many areasking: “Should we try to integrate into larger, more established andsecure organisations individuals who, before the dot-com bubble burst, wouldnot have given such employers the time of day?”Ifthere’s a lesson to be drawn anywhere, it’s from Silicon Valley where manydot-com employees – perhaps for the first time in their lives – face the threatof redundancy and worry about their ability to find another job quickly andeasily. Is there a way in which more advanced companies can take on and benefitfrom the passion and creativity of such individuals? In short, can thecommandos work in organisations more geared to the military police?Absolutely,says Jack Scott, a Silicon Valley-based partner with international executivesearch firm Heidric & Struggles, whose clients include both young start-upsand Fortune 500 companies. Not only that, says Scott, but businesses that failto take advantage of this talent will miss a golden opportunity.”Embracingdot-com employees into more established businesses is rather like a youngstergoing to live back with their parents after spending some time at college. Eachside needs to meet the other halfway and rethink the rules of engagement. Howquickly and painlessly they do that depends on how much open communication goeson,” he says. “Peoplewho have been attracted to start-ups are more risk-oriented, creative in theirapproach to business and comfortable with questioning the status quo. They’vebeen prepared to embrace wholeheartedly the business and mission and have givena certain amount of blood, sweat and tears to achieve something they believedin – even to the extent of putting the rest of their lives on hold. Largecompanies need to learn how to harness that kind of passion and energy.”Scottadds that now the employment wheel has turned back to a buyers’ market, hefears that larger organisations will be tempted to bring in even more formalityand structure because they don’t feel they have to cater as much to the newer,younger generation who are coming, cap in hand, for jobs.”Thatwould be a big mistake,” he stresses. “If we are to learn anythingfrom the high-tech experience over the past few years, it’s that traditionalcompanies have a lot to learn from people who push the envelope. They need toapproach dot-commers rather like a coach – be able to recognise the raw talent,and instil greater direction and focus than might normally be the case, yetwithout squashing the spark that makes that person so exciting and innovative.”JaneMoyer, director of HR at global media and technology company [email protected], agreesthat start-up types have a very different risk profile than someone attractedto a bricks and mortar company. But she offers a more guarded perspective withregard to bringing anyone into a workforce that operates from a very differentculture to what they’ve been used to.”Themore entrepreneurial these kids coming out of dot-coms are – and I call themkids, no matter how old they may be – the more they’ll have to adjust theirrisk profile and way of working. As HR professionals, we need to be alert tothat and look for evidence during the recruiting process that such a change ispossible. Frankly, it’s less about companies having to accommodate thecandidate than the other way around,” says Moyer. “While employeescoming out of dot-coms are extraordinarily entrepreneurial, their focus is onspeed and pushing a product on to the market as quickly as possible, as opposedto understanding the market and the customers.”Moyeradds that, in her experience, employees from start-ups tend not to work ascollaboratively as is expected in later-stage companies because they wereemployed as autonomous experts.”It’sone thing to want to attract people who think about problems differently, quiteanother to take on someone whose approach to solving problems is to do thingsby themselves with no collaboration with their team whatsoever,” she says.Shepoints out that whether it’s a tight labour market or not, there are threethings HR professionals should always interview for:–Skills – can the person do what you want them to do?–Attributes – how do they work best, are they team players, how developed aretheir interpersonal skills?–Cultural fit.”We’vegot a whole slew of younger workers who may be available to us now, which meanswe’ve got to be particularly careful about cultural fit,” says Moyer.”Many entrepreneurial types are more comfortable with a stage one company– three guys, $10m to play with and a great idea, working out of someone’sgarage. If that’s what they really want to be doing, these folks will nevermake the transition into a mainstream culture and it would disrupt the internalharmony of your company to take them on.”JackScott, however, feels that while the ability to successfully blend differentcultural perspectives is developing slowly, many companies believe there isvalue in what a new generation of employees has to bring to the table.  “Itmay be challenging, but it’s in their best interests for organisations torecognise the value of people who were given a chance to be creative, moreresponsible and authentic,” he says.”Early-stagecompanies do that by allowing individuals to flourish and flower rather thanbeing hemmed in by processes, procedures and bureaucracy. What you have thepotential of achieving here is a merger that combines the wisdom and experienceof people who’ve been in business a long time with the enthusiasm, passion andflexibility of this new generation.”Howyou achieve that is by ensuring everyone is focused on the same commonobjective and is shooting for the same goal. That’s hard to bring about if thetwo groups aren’t communicating in the first place.”Casestudy: EDSWhenit was founded in 1962, global information services company EDS foresaw that ITwould fundamentally change the way people, companies and governments operate.Since then, the company has grown from 500 employees to 120,000, its revenuefrom $16m to over $18.5bn. Despiteits age and size, EDS successfully helps former dot-com employees settle insmoothly, including many who had left the company dreaming of their path toriches and have since returned disillusioned. How has EDS managed this? Bymaintaining the company’s entrepreneurial spirit.ExplainsChris Ryan, regional director for HR delivery, whose responsibility it is tomanage the recruiting function in the US: “We certainly have someprocesses and structure, as you’d expect from a corporation as well-establishedas ours, but it’s blended with a culture of risk taking and being innovative.Our environment is not that different from what you’d expect from a dot-com –with the added benefit of a secure payroll. “Ourmantra is, ‘It’s better to ask forgiveness than wait for permission’, becausewe want people to take ownership and do whatever makes sense to support our clientand distinguish us from the competition.”Headvises that to benefit from the passion and creativity of start-uppersonalities, your mainstream culture has to be one in which those traitssurvive – not unlike that of a start-up with the emphasis on ownership,pitching in and doing whatever it takes to get the job done. If you don’t havethat environment, bringing in people who’ve only been exposed to dot-comculture won’t work – it’s a forced fit.”Ourextensive interviewing process gives us a good picture of how candidates wouldfit within any given culture. We’re also able to identify those people who areonly coming back or approaching us for economic reasons. Throughout every stagewe’re looking to determine how well the fit is likely to be,” Ryan says.Whatkind of organisation are you?It’simportant to know what sort of culture operates in your organisation before youcan effectively attract and retain people best suited to your needs – not justin terms of the jobs they do, but their alignment with your corporate mission.How companies operate has been illustrated using military metaphors. The goodnews is, all have the potential to be attractive to dot-commers.–Stage one companies (up to two years old): Attractive to those who thinkof work in terms of the projects they’d love to get involved with rather than acareer. They appeal to people who are passionate about a product or corporatevision, but whose missionary-like zeal can become dampened by processes andprocedures. These companies are ideal for multi-skilled, creative”commandos” who constantly desire to push the boundaries of what ispossible.–Stage two companies (two to five years old): This is the bestenvironment for the corporate “infantry” – the second-wave invasionforce whose desire is to capitalise on the initial success of the start-up andwho prefer to work with more substantial resources (and hence security). Theinfantry thrives in organisations that recognise that processes are necessaryto save time, but don’t allow them to get in the way of someone trying to dotheir best job. The people attracted to these better-established organisationswill take direction, but also want to be applauded for thinking for themselves.–Stage three companies (six years plus): These older companies need totake great care during the recruiting process that candidates fully understandthe corporate vision, mission and values in order to ensure alignment. The mostsuccessful at attracting entrepreneurial types actively demonstrate how eachemployee is expected to make a significant contribution to the business. Peopleattracted to these “occupying force” organisations want theopportunity to develop new, transferable skills, something they recognise isnot possible at companies with less structure and fewer resources.furtherinformation…AccidentalEmpires: how the boys of Silicon Valley make their millions, battle foreigncompetition and still can’t get a date, by Robert X Cringely, Harper Business,1992. Wanted new economy recruitsOn 1 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Lokpal: Differences can be resolved through talks, says Anna Hazare

first_imgAmid a war of words between government and civil society members over Lokpal Bill, both sides will meet in New Delhi on Wednesday for its drafting even as Anna Hazare reminded the ministers that differences could be resolved through dialogue and not through confrontation.As the government and Congress continued its attack on the civil society members, Hazare said he cannot force anyone not to level allegations like he was a mask of RSS or BJP by putting a hand on their mouth, but said the civil society has every right to raise issues.The activists, who have shot off letters to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee, will push for the inclusion of Prime Minister, judiciary and MPs under the ambit of the Lokpal, an issue on which government is at loggerheads with the civil society.”Differences can be resolved through talks but not through confrontation. We feel that the government has accepted some of our demands and a lot more needs to be done.There is time till June 30,” he told reporters here. “If nothing happens, we will see then,” he added.He said the civil society will put forth their views during Wednesday’s meeting and if their demands were not met, then they will start their agitation again.The last meeting on June 6 was boycotted by the civil society side to protest police crackdown on Ramdev’s protest. Congress has called Hazare an “unelected tyrant” while the civil society has taken exception to Mukherjee’s remarks that they were undermining democracy.advertisementAsked about allegations that he was associated with RSS and BJP, Hazare said, “how can I put hand on their mouth (and prevent them from making allegations)? In my lifetime, I have never gone close to any political party. Every party is similar. Some are graduates in corruption while some others have got doctorates in corruption.”Queried whether he considered BJP a corrupt party, he evaded direct reply and said, “why should I say, you people know.”On Congress’ allegation that the civil society was undermining democracy, he said the civil society has become the masters of the country when it turned republic.Emphasising that the government has to listen to people’s opinion, he said there was nothing wrong in civil society highlighting issues as the government is a representative of the citizens and are answerable.”We do not deny that Parliament is a big institution.But Parliament is not in Delhi alone. Have a look at the Constitution. The village parliament is bigger than the Parliament in Delhi. Nobody thinks about it. Who has send them to Parliament?” he said.Hazare also said there is so much corruption. “People in the government act like kings. That’s why people should reflect on what Congress leader Digvijay Singh said about bringing the Prime Minister under the ambit of the Lokpal Bill. It is noy just Anna Hazare’s question,” he said.Asked why they were not pulling out the drafting commitee as there was so much of mistrust, Kejriwal said they have to work with this. “At least, we can put on record our dissent note,” he said.For more news on India, click here. For more news on Business, click here. For more news on Movies, click here. For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

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Indian rap scene: A revolt that will not get televised

first_imgThere is something happening on the Indian rap scene. In the last year or so, four strong new voices have emerged from different parts of the country-Kashmir, Delhi, Calcutta and Punjab. And they rap in different languages (not surprising, given India’s multilingualism): English (MC Kash), Hindi (DJ Faadu), Bangla (G**** Circus) and Punjabi (Yo Yo Honey Singh).None of these rappers know each other, nor are there rap festivals (like with Indian rock and electronica) where they can meet each other and share notes. What unites them is the fact that they are using rap as a weapon to deal with local realities.Rap isn’t a homogenous entity. It’s not surprising that each of them draws inspiration from different traditions of rap. MC Kash is in the activist mould, much like The Last Poets (in content, not in style). In 1970s America, The Last Poets railed against the oppression of blacks; Kash talks about the plight of Kashmiris in contemporary times. DJ Faadu draws from a personal-confessional tradition, much like Eminem. Calcutta’s G**** Circus has a wider lyrical arc, but the words are essentially about resisting the mainstream. Honey Singh is strongly influenced by present-day gangsta rap.RangeRap is perhaps the most direct musical genre, and these rappers are masters at saying it like it is. They don’t hold back. They don’t dance around issues. And like all rappers, they are not afraid to use cuss words to make their point.The most striking feature of these rappers is that they are self-taught. They have grown up in India (except Honey who has a Canadian connection), and learnt the craft by listening to their heroes. Unlike Eminem who learnt to rap on the porches of Detroit houses and trailer parks, and honed his skills in freestyle competitions, these guys evolved in a vacuum, but have emerged surprisingly fully formed.advertisementSome days back I saw G**** Circus live at Out of the Box in Hauz Khas Village. The energy was unmistakeable; even though the lyrics were in Bangla, a sense of urgency got through. There was palpable anger in the air, though suffused with laughter and cheerfulness. G**** Circus are the kings of paradox.Later, I asked Neel (guitars) about what they sang about. He told me that the songs emerged from the cult film ‘G****’, about a loser. Q, who directed the film, is also the front man of the band, which has played gigs in London, Cologne, Berlin and Brussels, as well as cities in Poland and Romania. In Calcutta, their hometown, they’ve done just two live shows. In bhodro Calcutta, says Neel, the audience is intimidated by the lyrics. It’s simply too close for comfort.G**** Circus rap about the little man who has been ignored by the system. This little man could be anyone: a rickshaw puller, a small businessman, a singer. The recurrent theme is about the hostility of the mainstream to the underground, a hostility which stems from insecurity. G**** Circus strikes back on behalf of all losers: “Like a ghost/ I’ll climb on your shoulders and dance/ If you’re the big fat balloon/ I’m the safety pin who’ll burst your bubble.”The Delhi-based DJ Faadu sings about college life. But this is not the college life of Bollywood where happy boys and girls go on picnics and play antakshari in the bus. This is a real engineering college. There are few girls. Sexual frustration is rife in this community of nerd men: “In actual class mein ladkiyon kin kam ratio se main sick hoon/Ladke hi ladke bonus me hain sare ladke teacher/ Female teacher bhi hai ****/ B tech me char saal tak bhramchari banke padhte hain/ Isiliye to jyada engineer gay banke sadte hain.”Porn offers a solution but till a point: “Life me newspaper nahi padha but matrimonial padhta hoo/Maxim, Playboy, even Kamasutra bhi subscribe ki hai/ It’s humiliating par Sarita, Grahshobha bhi try ki hai.” This rings so true. It’s well-known that in engineering colleges boys brag not about how many women they’ve been with, but how many gigabytes of porn they have on their hard drives. The IITs have been trying to ban porn for many years but with little success. Faadu’s tracks reveal the dark flipside of our engineering success story: the perversions, and lonely and bleak inner lives: “Internet pe girlfriend ban gayi she asked me to come home/ As I started upon she had p— of her own/ Socha fir jab aa gaya to kuch to karke jaoon, yeah… I lost my virginity but other way round.”advertisementKashmirIf G**** Circus raps about the battle between the little man and the mainstream in abstract terms, MC Kash is very specific and concrete. His lyrics deal with the tensions between the hapless Kashmiri and the Indian state. He makes it clear that he has little to do with contemporary American rappers: “Everyday hustle, hell I ain’t no Jay Z.” He draws from an older tradition of American rap, which was about blacks resisting white oppression: “They can’t stop an idea/ When our minds are free.” His heart bleeds for Kashmir, a state he’s never travelled out of: “They gave us blood and hate/ Then wondered why every man is a rebel.” In an interview to the BBC he spoke about a comic but scary moment when Indian authorities raided his studio. They thought separatists were funding him. He is just an angry young man in his early twenties, rapping in English about the atrocity he sees around him: “We’re taking back the throne/ With my fist held high/ And holding a stone.”Yo Yo Honey Singh, the final rapper in this little survey, is mainstream. He now charges 70 lakhs for doing a Bollywood song. But like the others he has an underground side. People like Kash and Faadu are invisible and don’t do shows. Honey plays live from Toronto to Dehradun.UndergroundHe doesn’t perform his underground stuff but it’s a huge success on the net. He borrows heavily from gangsta rap – the fast cars, the sharp suits, the branded sports gear, the sexual aggro/machismo. The content though is hardcore desi Punjabi: the ‘pind’ replacing the ‘hood’, ‘purja’ replacing ‘hoe’, and so on. His songs are brutally explicit about sex.Of course, none of this stuff will ever make it to the television or the radio. Even though this is a revolution that will never be televised, the thousands of hits that these underground rappers garner on YouTube, and on their Reverbnation pages, shows that they have a massive audience.For years, the Indian underground was dominated by rock bands. They are technically very sound, and often use foreign professionals during production, which gives their albums a slick feel. But one was always left with the feeling that most had little to say. The new rappers, with their rough-and-ready recordings, have changed this. Not only do they have a lot to say, and about a range of subjects, they have also successfully put rebellion back into Indian music.As for those who find some of the lyrics misogynistic, well, it’s really part of the genre. In fact, it’s not so much misogyny as playful sexual aggression. I don’t think the day is far when Indian girls will enter the rap game. This has been happening in America for quite some time. In an Ice Cube song, when the man brags that hip hop “is a man’s world”, the female rapper retorts: “What you’re saying I don’t consider it as rapping/ Cause you’re on rewind and I’m the new what’s-happening.”advertisementlast_img read more

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Stars Support 21Day Vegan Kickstart

first_imgPCRM (Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) has just won $25,000 thanks to actress Marilu Henner and all of PCRM’s supporters who voted for her Live with Kelly! Grilling with the Stars recipe. She beat out eight other celebrities competing with their favorite recipes to win $25,000 for their favorite charity.Marilu is a coach for PCRM’s 21-Day Vegan Kickstart and longtime PCRM supporter.September is full of back-to-school excitement and change, so it’s a perfect time to learn how to start a healthy new approach to diet and fitness. That’s why doctors and dietitians with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine are teaming up with actresses Marilu Henner, Alicia Silverstone, NBA champ John Salley, and one of Oprah Winfrey’s favorite chefs to lead the 21-Day Vegan Kickstart.The online program — going live Sept. 3 at www.21DayKickstart.org — will provide all the knowledge and support adults and teenagers need to maintain a healthy weight, increase energy, and feel great by following a nutritious plant-based diet. There is no cost to join.“A growing number of high school and college students are embracing vegan and vegetarian diets,” says PCRM dietitian Susan Levin, M.S., R.D. “Our 21-Day Kickstart program offers expert guidance and a supportive step-by-step program that can help anyone start a nutritious, well-planned plant-based diet. It’s a fun, easy way to stay trim and healthy.”Kickstarters will receive daily e-mails with recipes and cooking tips, as well as a 21-day meal plan, an interactive vegan restaurant guide, and a free iPhone application. They’ll also get complete access to online videos, forums, and discussion boards featuring registered dietitians and physicians, such as PCRM president Neal Barnard, M.D., Dean Ornish, M.D., and John McDougall, M.D.Celebrity diet counselors, including best-selling authors Kathy Freston and Rory Freedman, actress Maggie Q, vegan firefighter Rip Esselstyn, and ultramarathon champ Scott Jurek will offer advice on food choices and grocery shopping, as well as personal stories about the challenges and benefits of new eating habits.Adopting a vegan diet is surprisingly easy, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Study participants lost weight, lowered their blood sugar, and reduced their need for medications used to treat diabetes and other health conditions. Other studies have found that vegan diets provide easy weight maintenance, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.And if you want to know Marilu’s recipe, here it is:Marilu Henner’s Healthy/Easy Grilled Mushroom and Heirloom Tomato Summer DishYield: 4-6 servingsINGREDIENTS:large container of organic mesclun greens 
3 organic heirloom tomatoes, (sliced 1/4-inch thick)
2 cups organic green grapes
6 cloves garlic (unpeeled)
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil (divided, plus 1/3 cup olive oil)
kosher salt
pepper
1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
6 large portobello mushrooms
nondairy mozzarella-flavored cheese
grill basketDIRECTIONS:Preheat the grill to medium-high.Marinate the grapes in olive oil, salt, and pepper.In a small bowl, toss the garlic cloves with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and salt. Wrap the garlic cloves in tinfoil and place on the grill. Cook until tender, about 20 minutes.In a medium bowl, whisk together the balsamic with the 1/3 cup olive oil and mustard. Cut tomatoes in thick slices and set aside.In a medium bowl, toss the mushrooms in the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Season with salt. Place them, cap side down, on the grill and close the lid. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes.Turn on the other side and cook for an additional 3 to 4 minutes. Re-season them lightly with salt and slice diagonally 1/2-inch pieces.Take mushrooms off, and put grapes in a grill basket and grill until the skins begin to blacken in spots, about 3 minutes.Remove the garlic from the grill. Squeeze the garlic pulp out from their skins and whisk it vigorously into the dressing.Arrange greens in center of plate, then alternate sliced mushrooms and sliced tomatoes on top and garnish with grapes and top with the dressing and a sprinkle of nondairy mozzarella-flavored cheese. Serve immediately.last_img read more

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Bid On Jeff Gordons Worn And Autographed Helmet Uniform Gloves And Shoes

first_imgBid now to own a rare “head-to-toe” autographed Pepsi MAX helmet, uniform, shoes and gloves from Jeff Gordon’s personal archives!This uniform was worn by Jeff Gordon at Auto Club Speedway in 2010.You will receive:Jeff Gordon 2010 Pepsi MAX HelmetJeff Gordon 2010 Pepsi MAX UniformJeff Gordon 2010 Pepsi MAX GlovesJeff Gordon 2010 Pepsi MAX ShoesThe winner of four NASCAR Cup Series championships, Jeff Gordon helped transform auto racing into a mainstream American sport.The auction will benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.To find out more and make a bid, visit CharityBuzz.com before May 31.The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF) is dedicated to being the end of breast cancer by advancing the world’s most promising research. Founded by Evelyn H. Lauder in 1993, BCRF-funded investigators have been deeply involved in every major breakthrough in breast cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and survivorship. This year, BCRF has awarded $59.5 million to support the work of more than 275 scientists at leading medical and academic institutions across 15 countries, making BCRF the largest private funder of breast cancer research worldwide. BCRF is the highest rated breast cancer organization in the U.S.—the only one with an “A+” from CharityWatch and Charity Navigator’s highest rating of four stars. Visit www.bcrf.org to learn more.last_img read more

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VANCOUVER ACTRESS SERINDA SWAN TO STAR IN NEW CBC DRAMA CORONER

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Swan most recently starred in the role of ‘Medusa’ in Marvel’s Inhumans, as well as playing the role of ‘Anne Bancroft’ in Ryan Murphy’s critically acclaimed Feud.  Other recent television credits include a season-long recurring arc opposite Dwayne Johnson on the third season of HBO’s hit comedy series, Ballers, as well as starring roles in Breakout Kings and Graceland. Feature credits include James Franco’s recently wrapped Blood On Wheels, Disney’s Tron, and Fox’s Percy Jackson franchise.  She is repped by APA, Elevate Entertainment, Performers Management in Canada, and Felker Toczek Suddleson Abramson.A CBC original series, CORONER is produced by Muse Entertainment and Back Alley Films. Morwyn Brebner is creator, executive producer and showrunner, Adrienne Mitchell (Durham County, Bellevue) is lead director and executive producer for Back Alley Films, and Jonas Prupas is executive producer for Muse Entertainment. For CBC, Sally Catto is General Manager, Programming; Helen Asimakis is Senior Director, Scripted Content; and Sarah Adams is Executive in Charge of Production. Bonnie Brownlee is Executive Director, Marketing.About CBC/Radio-Canada:CBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster. Through our mandate to inform, enlighten and entertain, we play a central role in strengthening Canadian culture. As Canada’s trusted news source, we offer a uniquely Canadian perspective on news, current affairs and world affairs. Our distinctively homegrown entertainment programming draws audiences from across the country. Deeply rooted in communities, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We are leading the transformation to meet the needs of Canadians in a digital world.About Muse Entertainment:Muse Entertainment is a leading film and television production company and international distributor known for its well-crafted and high-quality productions. It has development and production offices in Montreal, Los Angeles, Toronto and Vancouver. Muse productions have won critical acclaim, large audiences, over 100 international awards, including Emmy Awards, and more than 300 award nominations. Muse produces a wide range of primetime comedy and dramatic series, miniseries, television movies, feature films, documentaries, factual entertainment, family programs and animation. www.muse.caAbout Back Alley Films:Back Alley Film Productions Ltd, founded by Janis Lundman and Adrienne Mitchell, has been producing entertaining, award-winning television for over 25 years. With strong backgrounds in producing, (Lundman/Mitchell), and showrunning/directing (Mitchell), they have created and produced award-winning dramatic television series for Canadian and American networks which have sold worldwide. Back Alley’s most recent production was the drama thriller Bellevue, starring Oscar®-winning actress Anna Paquin. Other work includes the WWII drama series Bomb Girls, the critically acclaimed crime series Durham County, as well as the series Played, Bliss, Straight Up and Drop the Beat. Back Alley has offices in Toronto and Montreal. For more information visit: www.backalleyfilms.ca CBC, Canada’s public broadcaster, in association with Muse Entertainment and Back Alley Films, today announced that Vancouver-born actress Serinda Swan (Inhumans, Ballers) is set to star in the new CBC original drama CORONER (8×60), created by Morwyn Brebner (Saving Hope). Inspired by the best-selling series of books by M. R. Hall, the one-hour series centres on a newly appointed coroner investigating suspicious deaths in Toronto.  Production will begin in late summer 2018 in and around Toronto with the series set to premiere on CBC in winter 2019.Swan will play the title role of ‘Jenny Cooper’, a brave, determined yet vulnerable coroner driven by an intense desire for the truth. A former ER doctor and recently widowed mother, the passing of her beloved husband has unlocked a primal connection to death, tied to a secret in her past that is only now coming to the surface. She loves her son more than life itself and strives to support him while also trying to take care of herself. With storylines based on real-life cases, Jenny is a coroner for our time, an advocate for the dead even when it’s inconvenient for the living, and defender of those who are powerless or in peril.“We at Back Alley Films and our partners at Muse Entertainment are so excited to realize our dream of a creative collaboration with Morwyn Brebner to launch the exciting world of Jenny Cooper, played by the awesome Serinda Swan as a Toronto coroner, on CBC,” said executive producer and director Adrienne Mitchell. Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Branville McCartney resigns from The Senate

first_img ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, March 2, 2017 – Nassau – Every decision I have made since entering frontline politics has not been made lightly.   Whether it was to leave the FNM, to lead the DNA or most recently, to accept the post as leader of opposition business in the Senate, I have carefully and prayerfully considered my moves as a public figure.  It was no different when accepting the appointment as leader of Opposition business in the Senate.I accepted with the understanding that the Democratic National Alliance was separate and apart from any other opposition force, but would lend its voice, ideas and strength in official opposition to this failed Christie administration. Let the record reflect that when the electorate called for a more pragmatic opposition, the DNA was the first and only party to answer.  However, today I informed Her Excellency the Governor General that I am resigning my Senate post with immediate effect.  The leader of the official opposition has, unfortunately, only sown seeds of confusion since assuming her post, bringing no real leadership or focused ideas to the fore.   As leader of the DNA, in consultation with the executives of the party, I feel that we must now divest ourselves of the farce that has become the official opposition and fully direct our efforts to securing victory in the next general election.  Famed U.S. Astronaut Chris Hadfield once said leadership is not about glorious crowning acts.   It’s about “keeping your team focused on a goal and motivated to do their best to achieve it, especially when the stakes are high and the consequences really matter.”  By this standard, there currently exists no opposition party or personality in the House of Assembly that exemplifies the traits of true leadership.  Change clearly will not come from within; to that end we must continue our mission to affect change from outside Parliament until elections are held.  To the people of The Bahamas, we say that if you want a government serious about fighting crime and putting the fear of God into these savage criminals who apparently have free reign on our streets, look to the DNA; if you want an end to this corruption that pollutes and perverts governance in our country, look to the DNA; if you want real accountability for where in the world our billions of tax dollars have been funneled without our knowledge, look to the DNA; if you want a government that stands for you and will return power and prosperity to the rightful owners of The Bahamas, look to the DNA.  I encourage all Bahamians to register to vote and come with us to rid ourselves of the poisonous yoke of the failed parties that have brought this country to its knees. To our supporters throughout the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the mission has not changed.   The goal has not changed.   Our resolve has not changed. We will continue working day and night to provide a worthy alternative to the dysfunctional status quo.   It was an honor to once again represent the Bahamian people, however briefly, but it is clear the Bahamian people will be better served by a DNA not complicit in the dysfunction that hobbles Parliament at this time. The Bahamian people deserve better, and better is in your DNA.   May God protect and keep the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Related Items:#magneticmedianews Recommended for you The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

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San Diego Fleet to host donation drive for Alpha Project and blood

first_img KUSI Newsroom San Diego Fleet to host donation drive for Alpha Project and blood, food banks SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Alliance of American Football team the San Diego Fleet will host a community drive Monday to collect donations of food, blood and necessities like clothes and soap.The event is the Fleet’s first-ever donation drive since beginning play in the AAF in February. Donations made at the event will benefit the San Diego Blood Bank, the Alpha Project and the San Diego Food Bank. Residents who make a donation at the event will receive two free tickets to the team’s last regular-season home game April 14.“Donations are critical to the San Diego Food Bank since we are currently feeding 350,000 people per month in communities throughout San Diego County,” said James Floros, president and CEO of the San Diego Food Bank. “On behalf of the food bank’s staff and family of volunteers, we thank the San Diego Fleet for giving back to the community and helping our fellow San Diegans in need.”The Alpha Project is accepting donations of clothing, blankets, soap and shampoo. The food bank is seeking canned and non-perishable goods like soup, beans, peanut butter, rice and baby formula.The community drive is scheduled to begin at noon at SDCCU Stadium at 9449 Friars Road. Posted: April 1, 2019 April 1, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News, Sports FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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