Scoreboard roundup — 4/29/19

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Monday’s sports events:MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLAMERICAN LEAGUEBoston 9 Oakland 4Minnesota 1 Houston 0Chi White Sox 5 Baltimore 3Tampa Bay 8 Kansas City 5NATIONAL LEAGUESt. Louis 6 Washington 3Cincinnati 5 NY Mets 4Atlanta 3 San Diego 1Milwaukee 5 Colorado 1San Francisco 3 LA Dodgers 2NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFSPhiladelphia 94 Toronto 89Denver 121 Portland 113NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFSSt. Louis 4 Dallas 3Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bycenter_img April 30, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 4/29/19last_img

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To advance sustainability, fight inequality, researcher says

first_img Toxic inequality Related Research points to racial disparities in lead risk, and a model for action Unless social and economic inequalities are addressed, sustainability efforts in urban centers will likely stall or never take hold, according to a new Harvard study.Authored by Robert Sampson, the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences, the study suggests that technological approaches must be accompanied by efforts to reduce those inequalities, create strong, long-lasting neighborhood social networks, and foster greater citizen interaction with government if sustainability projects are to be successful. The research is described in a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“With the advent of big data and explosion in computing power, there’s been a great deal of attention paid to the notion of ‘smart cities’ that coordinate the operation of the various municipal systems, like power, energy, water and transportation,” he said. “While that is important, it needs to be balanced with the social structure of cities.”Drawing on multiple studies conducted in Boston, Chicago, and Los Angeles, Sampson was able to identify a handful of ways in which inequality affects sustainability, and to develop a theoretical framework and tools for how to measure whether efforts to confront it are effective.“The inequalities we’re talking about here are more than just economic,” Sampson said. “They’re also racial, in the sense of the social isolation of particular neighborhoods, which in turn is related to problems like violence.”How do problems like violence and social disengagement affect sustainability?“These things are all corrosive to the social structure, and that is deeply, in and of itself, part of a sustainable community,” Sampson said. “One example I use in the study is the country of Colombia. The war there has gone on for decades, and was so severe that it undermined the ecological stability of the entire country because the government was unable to take action on sustainability. If you think about the bandwidth of a society or of a neighborhood, these fundamental ruptures in the social structure — violence, fear, withdrawal, isolation — they matter to sustainability.”It isn’t only the social structure of neighborhoods or nations that can be undermined by inequality — differences in government investment and perceived legitimacy can also leave long-lasting scars. “This is crucial because technological systems depend on the interaction of citizens,” Sampson said. “The extent to which citizens are reporting not just emergencies, but quality of life issues like building conditions, illegal garbage dumping, or rat infestations is an indicator of the extent to which people are trusting of the state.”As part of the Boston Area Research Initiative, Sampson and colleagues analyzed more than a million calls to both 911 and Boston’s 311 system for non-emergency issues like graffiti, broken street signs, and potholes, and found that usage of both varied widely by neighborhood.“This pattern is related to what we call legal cynicism,” Sampson said. “Citizens in communities that have been subject to severe concentrations of poverty and have seen the withdrawal of services … they tend to be mistrustful of official authority.“We have seen this play out across the country in recent years with regard to police shootings,” he continued. “But there is also a correlation between that inequality and a lack of reporting on health and other sustainability issues in these neighborhoods.”In an effort to quantify how various factors affect sustainability from city to city and neighborhood to neighborhood, Sampson and colleagues developed “ecometrics.” The approach is designed to measure everything from citizen engagement to the existence and health of informal social networks, and the implications for sustainability.“Our approach is partly driven by the kinds of data we’re now seeing,” Sampson said. “We’re talking millions of records, but the data that are being generated are mainly for administrative purposes … so the raw data themselves are almost uninterpretable.”As an example, he said, residents of Beacon Hill may report more instances of graffiti than other neighborhoods, but more reports don’t necessarily reflect more graffiti.“It doesn’t automatically mean Beacon Hill residents are more pro-social,” Sampson said. “And it may not mean there is more graffiti in their neighborhood — it could simply indicate that they are more likely to report instances of graffiti because of successful past experiences with reporting.“We don’t know what’s going on just from the number of reports — there’s no context,” he said. “What we’re trying to do is take that data and produce a meaningful indicator … so we can make comparisons and understand what one area may be doing that another isn’t.”last_img read more

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Record rent for Dublin offices

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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George Bridges Named New President of The Evergreen State College

first_imgFacebook48Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Evergreen State CollegeThe Evergreen State College announced George Bridges as the new President today.The board of trustees of The Evergreen State College announced today its selection of George Bridges, Ph.D., as the college’s next president. Bridges, who was selected from a large pool of accomplished candidates, has been the president of Walla Walla-based Whitman College, one of the nation’s top liberal arts colleges, for the past decade. Prior to leading Whitman College, Bridges served as dean and vice provost of undergraduate education at the University of Washington. He holds degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D., Sociology, and M.A., Criminology) and from the University of Washington (B.A., Sociology).“George Bridges is an exceptional leader with deep experience at public and private institutions, large and small,” said Keith Kessler, chair of The Evergreen State College board of trustees. “It was clear from our interviews and campus forums, and from speaking with his professional colleagues, that George will be a strong and effective advocate for Evergreen and its bold approach to interdisciplinary teaching and learning. We’re extremely pleased to have him as our next president.”“I am absolutely delighted by the decision,” Bridges said upon learning of the board’s action. “The opportunity to serve as Evergreen’s next president is an extraordinary honor. Given the college’s strong national reputation as a leading public liberal arts institution and its dedicated and talented board members, faculty, staff and students, I view this appointment as a unique and rare privilege. I look forward to learning about the college’s aspirations and expectations from all members of the Evergreen community and to meeting the many Evergreen alumni in every corner of the country.”Evergreen’s presidential search process was informed by a search committee that included faculty, staff, students and trustees. The committee also included alumni and representatives from beyond the college including Gerry Alexander, former chief justice of the Washington State Supreme Court; Lynda Weinman, Evergreen alumna and executive chair of the board and co-founder of the online learning company Lynda.com; and Craig Chance, Evergreen alumnus, past chair of The Evergreen State College Foundation and senior vice president of Columbia Bank. The college also held open candidate forums to which the public was invited.George Bridges, currently the President of Whitman College, will begin his duties as the President of The Evergreen State College on October 1, 2015.Bridges’ official start date is October 1, but he will be on campus for several events this summer and fall, including fall convocation. The annual salary for the position is $300,000.Dr. Thomas L. “Les” Purce announced in May 2014 that he would retire this summer. He has served as Evergreen’s president since July of 2000 after serving as Washington State University’s vice president of extended university affairs and dean of academic programs. Between 1989 and 1995, Dr. Purce served in several roles at Evergreen, including vice president for college advancement, interim president and executive vice president. His retirement date is expected to be August 31, 2015.Founded in 1967 and opened in 1971, Evergreen is a nationally acclaimed public liberal arts institution recognized for its innovative interdisciplinary approach to teaching and learning. The college has been noted as one of the nation’s best colleges by the Princeton Review, the Fiske Guide to Colleges, US News and World Report and Washington Monthly. Evergreen has also been recognized as one of the nation’s top “green” colleges and one of the best schools for military veterans. In addition to its undergraduate offerings at its main Olympia campus, an upper division program in Tacoma and a reservation-based program serving Native American communities, Evergreen offers three graduate programs: a Master in Teaching, Master of Environmental Studies and Master of Public Administration. The college has approximately 4,200 students.last_img read more

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