Senate resolution aims to increase transparency with Club Coordination Council

first_imgIn its weekly meeting, Notre Dame’s student senate approved a resolution requiring the Club Coordination Council (CCC) to address the Senate once a semester. This resolution detailing an increase in communication between the two branches of student government comes after a resolution earlier this year which increased funding to clubs from 37 percent to 40 percent.Sophomore Patrick Harris, vice president of the CCC, gave a presentation to the Senate detailing a basic outline of the CCC’s role in financial allocation for clubs.“The Club Coordination Council often spends its time working with other clubs as opposed to student government, so in the past we’ve kind of been a distant branch of student government,” Harris said.The CCC handles outreach to clubs and allocation and distribution of the money that Student Government gives them. They divide over 400 student clubs into six divisions based on type of club, such as academic, athletic and social service clubs.“The divisions ensure that clubs of different kinds are able to get the support that they need, not all that support will be the same depending on what division you are in,” Harris said.There are two club funding allocation dates, one in the fall and one in the spring. During those days, the CCC tracks the projected expenses of the club. Combined, all the clubs total just shy of $2.2 million dollars for the entire year, Harris said.However, the funding clubs receive is now around $360,000 per year to allocate to all the clubs, which is only 15 percent of the projected expenses, Harris said.“Over the past couple of years, the number of clubs has greatly expanded and the funding has not expanded as much, so that’s why the resolution increased the funding from 37 percent to 40 percent,” Harris said.The CCC then ranks the funds through a tier system by division, where some expenses are higher tiered, meaning they will be more heavily funded, and some are lower tiered, or less funded. The highest-tiered groups receive 80 percent of the requested funding from the CCC, and the lowest-tiered groups receive 20 percent. The determination process is based on a number of factors, including club members, revenue, fundraising and dues, Harris said.“For academic clubs, conference fees and airfare are typically more expensive than food, so food is tiered lower and gets cut more strictly,” Harris said.“For athletic clubs, the equipment and field rentals are tiered higher than food or travel,” he added.The resolution aims to uphold transparency between the CCC and the senatorial branch of student government to better ensure the needs of the student body population are being upheld fairly in terms of the financial distribution of resources between club divisions.The senate also voted on a resolution to clarify the executive responsibilities of chief of staff to the student body president and vice president.“The chief of shall assist student body president in daily meetings and tasks as president,” freshman parliamentarian Thomas Davis said.“The chief of staff shall assist the student body vice president in coordination and efforts ad hoc of any departments as needed,” Davis added.The responsibilities also include convening and chairing departmental meetings in the absence of that department’s director, attending cabinet meetings and working with the press secretary for press releases, among other tasks.The meeting wrapped up with the group approving the nominations of the SUB 2019-2020 executive board as well as the Student Union treasurer’s two assistants.Tags: 2019-2020 senate, Chief of Staff, Club Coordination Council, Senate, SUBlast_img read more

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Top Cop wishes Force success ahead of impending challenges

first_img– formally bids farewell to Force after 33 yearsWith less than a week before he officially leaves the Guyana Police Force after 33 years of service, Top Cop Seelall Persaud on Wednesday afternoon wished the law enforcement agency success ahead of impending challenges the country is likely to face.This sentiment was expressed at a farewell parade organised in his honour at the Police Sports Club Ground. The event featured much pomp and ceremony as theSeelall Persaud delivering his final address as Commissioner of Police at his Farewell Parade on WednesdayForce formally bid farewell to its 31st Police Commissioner.The ceremony saw the attendance of several senior and junior ranks as well as former members of the Force. In addition, heads of other sister law enforcement agencies and Public Security Minister Khemraj Ramjattan were also present at the ceremony.Delivering his final address as Top Cop, Persaud pledged his continued support for the Police Force, as he mentioned impending challenges the organisation will face.“The Force and country at this particularly time, see several factors that will contribute to an environment that is likely to pose a greater challenge to the Force in the future. Those will include the operation of western businesses in Guyana and the raise of terrorist threats within the region. I’m sure the Security Sector Reform study that was conducted recently would have addressed most of those issues, if not all. And so, I want to wish my successor and his team at the topPublic Security Minister Khemraj Ramjattan was among the gathering of top ranking officials from the disciplined forces who were in attendance at the Farewell Parademanagement, the best for the future… my full support will continue to be with them,” he posited.During his eight-minute long speech before a packed gathering, the outgoing Commissioner reflected on his years of service saying the varying exposures he has had in the Force contributed significantly to his development over the years. He added that the training and interactions he has had locally and overseas have certainly impacted his development through a unique brand of learning experience.Touching on his work over the years, the outgoing Top Cop reflected on the last four years at the helm of the Police Force which saw him crossing unchartered territories, particularly as it relates to building public trust and improving theOutgoing Commissioner Seelall Persaud saluting his final March Pass at the Police Sports Club GroundForce’s welfare as well as capacity.Persaud went on to recognise that he would not have had such a “good journey” in the country’s premier law enforcement agency without the unwavering support of his family and the commitment of both senior and junior ranks he worked with over the years.“I was a long, eventful but enjoyable journey that I have had, and I did not come this distance in isolation. So there are many whom I need to thank for it; highlights of those, I’ll start by thanking God for bring me this far. I’m leaving the Force in good health and with full confidence of facing and going into the next phase of my life,” posited the Commissioner.The Essequibo-born Persaud joined the Force in October 1984 and served in several high ranking positions including Head of the Criminal Investigations Department (CID) before being appointed acting Commissioner in 2014. His confirmation as Top Cop then came the following year. During his three-decades plus years of service, he was awarded the Disciplined Services Medal (DSM) for his “dedication to duty and steadfastness of mind and body”. He also used opportunities afford to him to obtain a Degree in Public Management and Diploma in International Studies.Persaud also served as Chairman of the Caribbean Working Group on Illicit Narcotics, Chairman of the Caricom Standing Committee on Intelligence and Guyana’s Expert on the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism of the OAS (2009-2013) respectively.More recently during his four-year tenure at the helm of the Police Force, the outgoing Top Cop spearheaded several projects aimed at building public trust and boosting not only the Force’s capacity but its welfare as well. These include the highly successful social crime prevention programme, the establishment of the Fallen Heroes Foundation and the procurement of a US$2.6 million donation in vehicles from the Chinese Government, among others.last_img read more

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