Big Game 6: Rangers-Habs

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares NEW YORK — The last time the New York Rangers had a game to forget, they responded with five straight wins that put them on the cusp of the Stanley Cup finals.They are still there, and the Montreal Canadiens aren’t going away without a fight.New York needs one more victory to reach the championship round for the first time in 20 years. The Rangers know that Game 6 at home on May 29 is their best chance to get it.They returned home from Montreal on May 28, one day after a wild 7-4 loss cut their series lead to 3-2. If New York doesn’t end it on May 29, the Rangers will have to go back to Montreal for a deciding Game 7.New York, which went the full seven games in each of the first two rounds of this year’s playoffs, will be playing its 20th postseason game. No team that played a pair of seven-game series before the conference finals has reached the Stanley Cup finals.“It’s an opportunity to win the game to go to the Stanley Cup final,” Rangers forward Brad Richards said. “I think everybody is alert and ready that way. We were talking about it all (Tuesday) how excited we were to get on the ice and start playing.“We had some mental breakdowns, but I don’t think it had anything to do with (fatigue). We’ve had a lot of rest this series. The opportunity that faces us right now, we’re pretty excited about it. I don’t think there is too much letdown.”In the second round, a poor performance at home in Game 4 against Pittsburgh dropped the Rangers into a 3-1 series hole. But New York won Game 5 on the road, took Game 6 at home, and won the clincher back in Pittsburgh to set up the match-up with Montreal.Now that the Canadiens have staved off elimination once, the Rangers are wary of giving them any more hope they can turn the tables.“You learn a lot from it. That’s why experience is experience,” Richards said. “You go through many situations. (Tuesday) night was a bad feeling, but today we’re getting on a plane to go back to our city, and we get to play in front of our fans.“It’s always, forget as quick as possible and try to remember the good things that we’re doing. It was one bad night, but we’ve been doing a lot of good things in this series.”The Rangers won the opening two games in Montreal and then split a pair of overtime decisions at home. Even though they have had success on the road and in recent Game 7s, they know that going the distance again works against them.“It’s a desperate time,” Richards said. “You don’t want to go back to a Game 7 where anything can happen. We want to get this done. They’re a good team anywhere.“We’re going to have to be a lot better, and we will be.”This is as far as New York has advanced since captain Mark Messier led the club to the 1994 Stanley Cup title — breaking the Rangers’ 54-year drought.The Garden will be ready to celebrate again May 29. After the Rangers lost Game 4 to Pittsburgh, the loyal fans thought they might not see their team again until next season. That will be the situation again if the Canadiens pull off another victory.“You win a game, and things change in your locker room and you start feeling better about yourselves,” Rangers defenseman Marc Staal said. “We know how it feels coming back in a series, but it doesn’t change anything in our room. We are as confident as ever going into our building, and looking forward to it.”So are the Canadiens.They know that if they would’ve scored in overtime of Game 4 as they did in Game 3, they would’ve had a two-game sweep at the Garden and would be the ones looking to advance Thursday.“We’ll be ready for one of those tight-checking games,” defenseman Josh Gorges said after an optional practice in Montreal. “I’m sure it will be again one of those hard-fought games that we’ll have to make sure that we’re even better than we were last game.”Montreal will have rugged forward Brandon Prust back in the lineup after he served a two-game suspension for a late hit on Derek Stepan in Game 3 that broke the Rangers forward’s jaw. Stepan returned May 27 and scored two goals while wearing a full faceguard.The Rangers will be without defenseman John Moore. He was suspended for two games after receiving a match penalty  for a hit to Montreal forward Dale Weise’s head.Moore will miss the remaining two games in this series if it goes the distance, or will sit out Game 1 of the Stanley Cup finals if the Rangers advance with a win Thursday.“It’s kind of what I would’ve thought would’ve happened,” Canadiens captain Brian Gionta said Wednesday night after the team arrived at their New York hotel. “They were very similar plays, and I guess the precedent was set on Prust’s hit.”Henrik Lundqvist will be back in goal for the Rangers after he was pulled in Game 5 on a rare off night in which he allowed four goals on 19 shots in less than two periods. He avoided the loss when New York rallied from a 4-1 deficit to get even. Backup goalie Cam Talbot gave up two goals in relief.“(Tuesday) night was probably the best game we’ve played in this series,” Canadiens forward Lars Eller said. “If we keep doing a lot of those things, I think the end result will be good.”(IRA PODELL, AP Sports Writer)last_img read more

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CANADAS FOLK LAUREATE GORDON LIGHTFOOT TURNS 80

first_img Twitter Advertisement This Nov. 17 marks Gordon Lightfoot’s 80th birthday, and the singer-songwriter has chosen to celebrate the milestone by giving a gift to his hometown.He’s making a stop in Orillia, Ont., on his birthday, to perform a benefit concert for the Opera House and the Orillia Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital.In 1967 when CBC-TV’s Telescope profiled the young “folk laureate,” the program opened with Orillia as the backdrop. Gordon Lightfoot, from the Jan. 1, 1967 CBC TV special 100 Years Young. (CBC Still Image Library) LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Telescope host Fletcher Markle summed up Lightfoot as “a country boy whose home territory encouraged an awareness of nature and weather, and the simplicity of open spaces that is echoed lyrically in many of his songs.”‘The country that I grew up in’Lightfoot talked with Telescope about the influence of of the countryside of his boyhood on his music, as he sat, surrounded by the rocks of the Canadian Shield.He went on to explain that the “little landscapes, or images” that come up in all his songs are not particular images, but just a backdrop for the “idea and the concept that you’re working on.”center_img Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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Inuk artist creates new life from roadkill

first_imgAnnette Francis APTN National NewsManitok Thompson has been working with a lot of animals lately … the ones killed by the side of the road.“I just like to use the skin because my father who was unilingual would be disgusted to see an animal on the side of the road and nobody picked it up to make something out of it,” said Thompson.Ever since Thompson moved to Carleton Place, a small town west of Ottawa, last September, she started collecting roadkill.“I’ve been doing roadkill skins and just trying to make something out of the roadkill,” she said.Thompson, originally from Coral Harbour, Nunavut, said it’s unheard of to just throw away a dead animal.So far she’s gathered, or been given deer, beaver, coyote, and plenty of raccoons.She tans the skins herself. The animals here are different than at home, so she’s had to experiment. Thompson came up with her own concoction of laundry soap and oil.“I’ve done a lot of sort of experimental stuff,” she said. “Just rubbing it on the skins, tying it up and let it soak overnight.”Thompson has made some useful items, like hats, or mitts. She’s sold some and donated other items.“Like the parka I made with the raccoon fur. I’m donating it to a hockey team from my hometown, they’re going to Yellowknife, they can raise enough money right now so I’m I’ve donated stuff to sports teams to get them out of their little towns and experience something else,” she said.Thompson wanted to share these skills so she opens up her home ever Saturday to people who want to “think outside the box.”“Sometimes I’ve had ten people, I’ve had people in my sewing room, I have ladies there, I have two other lady friends, Inuit friends that are doing skins over there because there’s a lot of blood. This is not a clean job and I have ladies here cutting mittens or parkas and I’m teaching them how to do this and other ladies teaching them how to do skins,” said Thompson.According to Thompson, since the word’s gotten out, there’s been a lot interest in her roadkill creations. She’s also been invited to Norway to reach the process of tanning and crafting.“It’s creativity, innovation, thinking outside the box, you can make something out of that dead raccoon and sell it for $150.00, if you can do the skill you can make money, we’re survivors,” she said.last_img read more

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