It’s time to nominate young heroes for the Donegal Garda Youth Awards

first_imgNominations have now opened for the Donegal Garda Youth Awards 2019 in association with the Donegal Joint Policing Committee.The Awards celebrate outstanding young people between the ages of 13 and 21 years. The awards aim to acknowledge the contribution by young people who work to make their communities a better place to live in.And every nominee is a winner. Speaking at the launch on Wednesday, Inspector Shaun Grant, Letterkenny, who is PRO for the Youth Awards, said that “the nomination process is open to everyone, so if you know of a young person who is committed to making a difference to their community, please put them forward, as every nominee will receive a certificate, even if they do not win an award. This way, all nominees are recognised for their efforts, and the certificate is a very valuable item to have on a young person’s CV into the future”. An Garda Síochána in Donegal has today launched the Donegal Garda Youth Awards 2019 in association with the Donegal Joint Policing Committee at the launch were Nicholas Crossan, Cathaoirleach of Donegal County Council, Gerry McGonagle, Chairperson Joint Policing Committee, Liam Ward, Director of Community Development & Planning Services and Srg. John Forkan. Photo Clive WassonThe presentation of the Donegal Garda Youth Awards in association with the Donegal Joint Policing Committee will take place in early 2020.There are 4 overall awards including an Individual Award recognising a young person’s positive contribution to their community, making it a better place to live; a Group Award where groups of 2 or more make a positive contribution to their community, making it a better place to live; Special Achievement Award where the nominee has overcome difficult circumstances, defied all the odds, and whose commitment deserves recognition; and finally the Community Safety Award where through a crime prevention or safety initiative / innovation, an individual or group have made their community a safer place to live.All categories are for young people aged between 13 and 21 years on 31st August 2019.Each Garda Division in the country will nominate one winner in each of the above four categories, to represent their Division at the National Youth Awards which will take place in Spring 2020. The Group Award category applies for groups of two or more young people whose combined efforts have contributed positively to their communities. The Special Achievement category is open to any young person who has defied the odds, or overcome difficult circumstances, and whose commitment deserves recognition.In launching this year’s Awards, Chief Superintendent Terry Mc Ginn, said “we wish to recognise the efforts made by these young people, as they contribute to their community, both at a local level, and also in wider areas. An Garda Síochána would like to pay tribute to the Joint Policing Committee for their assistance with the launch of the Donegal Youth Awards.”Chair of Donegal Joint Policing Committee, Cllr. Gerry McMonagle expressed his delight at the Donegal Joint Policing Committee’s association with this Awards Scheme, which sees young people in the community recognised for their positive endeavours, saying “the positive contribution of our young people to their own communities must be commended and I would encourage community groups, organisations and indeed individuals to take the time to nominate young people who they believe have made their communities a better place to live in.”The nomination forms are now available from any Garda Station in the Donegal Garda Division, from Community Gardai in each local Garda District or on request from [email protected]   Forms can also be downloaded from www.donegalcoco.ie/community/jointpolicingcommittee/donegalgardayouthawards2019Nomination forms can be submitted by post to the Chief Superintendents Office, Donegal Garda National Youth Awards, Letterkenny Garda Station, New Line Road, Co. Donegal F92 PC03 or emailed to [email protected] Closing date for receipt of nominations is Friday 13th December 2019 at 5pm.It’s time to nominate young heroes for the Donegal Garda Youth Awards was last modified: October 30th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegal Garda Youth Awardslast_img read more

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QPR set to assess defender

first_imgQPR will assess the condition of defender Danny Gabbidon tomorrow.The Welsh centre-back missed Saturday’s win against Wigan with a hamstring strain and is a doubt for this weekend’s FA Cup match against Chelsea.Rangers should know by Thursday afternoon whether Gabbidon is likely to be available for the derby clash.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Faceboooklast_img

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World Cup spirit lives on in Youth Zones

first_img2 August 2010The energy and spirit of South Africa’s 2010 Fifa World Cup is being harnessed for sustainable social development in Africa through the Youth Zones initiative, which combines football, computer literacy and life-skills training to create an enabling environment for young people in disadvantaged communities.Youth Zones is a joint initiative of the Foundation for a Safe South Africa (FSSA), the 2010 Local Organising Committee (LOC), the Embassy of the Netherlands and the Institute for Democracy in Africa (Idasa).In South Africa, the programme is already running in sites where the LOC built high-level synthetic football pitches, in Mamelodi, Evaton North and Cosmo City in Gauteng province; Upington in the Northern Cape; Somerset West and East in the Western Cape; Siyabuswa in Mpumalanga; Jane Furse in Limpopo province; and Mogwase in Rustenburg, North West province.It is also running in Umzimkhulu and Mutare in neighbouring Zimbabwe, and in Manica in Mozambique.Grass-roots capacity buildingThe programme aims to build the capacity of grass-root football teams by supporting them with football equipment, coaching and organisational growth.At the same time, the computer literacy component teaches youngsters how to use computers and provides them with internet, while the life-skills component teaches communication, conflict resolution, teamwork, responsibility, health and leadership.Overall, the programme aims to create enabling environments in which young people develop self-belief and the confidence they need to take risks and be creative.Each community is encouraged to launch three small “organic” projects of their own initiative. Projects already off the ground revolve around netball, gymnastics, culture, English literacy, entrepreneurship, and combating HIV/Aids.“The challenge is to prevent those who are born into victim circumstances from becoming offenders,” says project leader Roelf Meyer of the Foundation for a Safe South Africa. “Making choice available in these circumstances can transform lives away from crime to real and legitimate opportunity. We promote safety by proactively investing in society, by stopping crime before it happens.”Friendships form the foundationProject coordinator Schalk van Heerden says Youth Zones is “not about just kicking a ball. It’s about the social relations inherent in a team, the family dynamic that provides energy, support and accountability. That’s why we use football and even netball teams to learn and become change agents in their communities.”The approach, says Van Heerden, is built on a relational model, in which friendships form the foundation for sustainable actions and programmes.Once real-life friendships have been established and computer literacy is in place, the focus shifts to a virtual community, where besides Skype, Facebook and e-mail, participants interact on the www.youthzones.co.za website.One of the members of the youth website, Nelson Veremo, says they are encouraged to blog, upload photos, chat and to share stories of hope as well as failure.“Any person can join – boys, girls from any place,” says Veremo. “It’s very interesting knowing we are not alone in our struggles and dreams.”Doctor Mabila, of the Institute for Democracy in Africa (Idasa), says participants learn practical things from one another, and that the youngsters are proud to share their stories.Mabila says they are hoping that by the time the 2014 Fifa World Cup kicks off in Brazil, the Youth Zones network will be able to showcase South Africa’s shared humanity, mutual learning and care.Other organisations and companies backing the Youth Zones initiative include Torque IT, the Kelly Group, Microsoft, Convergence Partners, SAB, ABI, Khulisa, Fevertree and Heartlines.BuaNewslast_img read more

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Learn the Real (Hard) Work of Residential Design

first_imgReflections on BuildingEnergy 2015NESEA Conference HighlightsOld Hippies Conspire to Save the WorldPearls of Wisdom From Recent ConferencesVideo: BuildingEnergy 2014: Stump the Energy NerdFrom Designed to Built: Delivering Your Green HomeIntegrated Design Reassessing Passive Solar Design PrinciplesSix Myths of Sustainable Design The other wanted a model home, a showcase of the possible, but with “turnkey” design that didn’t consume too much client time. One would be certified with PHIUS, using the newly minted WUFI Passive software, while the other pursued PHI certification with PHPP. But at their root, these projects shared a target, shared a climate, shared an architect. Chris will walk us through the process of each, and explain the whys of residential passive design in southern Maine.When architect Jesse Selman (C&H Architects in Amherst, Massachusetts) and builder Kent Hicks (Kent Hicks Construction in Chesterfield, Massachusetts) began a project together in Savoy, Massachusetts, it was simple enough: a deep energy retrofit of an existing home. The clients were committed to the property, owned a functioning house, and had decided to bring it up to modern standards for energy efficiency.What followed was anything but simple. It became a process spanning years, in which this team explored every branch of the residential decision tree. Would they keep the original house, or knock it down? Maybe they’d build on the same foundation, or use the old stone square as a garden plot? They explored factory-built and stick-framed new construction. With energy consultant Mike Duclos, of DEAP Energy Group, they pursued Passivhaus until the compromises in the view became too great, and they tested every material against the client’s extremely sensitive nose, which would not tolerate a chemical-laden environment. With a good-hearted client (the process can be unbearable without this saving grace), they pursued this ornate process to its elegantly simple end. High performance home designBuilder Mark Doughty (Thoughtforms) has made a living creating custom homes for others in the Greater Boston area, and when it came to creating a home for himself, he sought out engineer Jordan Goldman (Zero Energy Design). Together, they worked to design a high-performance home that, more than a year after completion, is producing more energy than it consumes. But what happened when Mark went back to business, creating homes to satisfy other people’s dreams?Architect Hank Keating (Trinity Development) works for a development company which focuses on urban neighborhoods, but he is not afraid of a challenge. He’d seen Passivhaus Consultant Mike Duclos (Deap Energy Group) present on Passivhaus, and brought him on when he started a Passive project of his own. The scope was large: one primary residence, one guest residence, an apartment for the interns, and a working farm. It’s not clear that he knew exactly what they were in for together, but Hank was undaunted by the process. With Mike as his guide through the thorns of PHPP, he had to come to grips with the consequences of design choices like large amounts of north-facing glass. They’ll talk together about the challenges and the compromises of an architect’s first foray into Passivhaus, and what they learned from the process. Residential retrofit in tricky situationsArchitect David Foley (Holland and Foley Architecture) and builder Paul Eldrenkamp (Byggmeister Design Build) ought to know better. Residential deep energy retrofit — bringing a home’s heating energy consumption down by 70% or more — are hard enough in normal circumstances. Doing renovations in historic districts are also notoriously fraught with perils, both financial and regulatory. Who in their right minds would combine the two?No one, including this team, who had been assured by code enforcement previously that the building was just outside the historic district. By the time the permitting process revealed that they’d be required to use all wood windows to comply with historic requirements, the project was already too developed to give up on. David and Paul will discuss the challenges, technical and otherwise, which faced this renovation of a 1928 Boston area home. The most expensive part of this project for David Foley himself? That it pushed him further along the road to net zero in his own thinking — and engendered a new round of renovations at his own home.His firm has been doing deep energy retrofits for years now, but when the tables turn, and it’s time for his own house renovation, architect Tom Hartman (C&H Architects) has to sell the idea to his wife and family, who would really rather plan a long family vacation. On a building he’s been working on and monitoring for more than a decade, Tom pushes through the (nearly) last round of retrofits at his 1911 Sears kit home: new siding and insulation to the outside, and a new heat pump for heating. He’ll walk through the calculations that got him there, the window details that saved his interior trim, the financial justifications, which finally earned him the green light, and the compromises we all make when it’s our own money on the line.I come to NESEA every year to hear stories like these — real people doing real, hard work, and coming back with real battle scars to tell the rest of us the results. I’m looking forward this winter to sitting back and listening to somebody else’s horror stories, and enjoying somebody else’s hard-earned successes. I hope you’ll join us this March 9 and 10, 2016 at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston for BuildingEnergy 16. RELATED ARTICLES center_img “When You Come To A Fork in the Road… Take It”Architect Chris Briley (a partner at Briburn in Portland, Maine) will share the stories of two projects, in parallel, with two clients, two sets of challenges, and two completed Passive Houses. One client didn’t want it to “look like a Passivhaus” and had a pretty strong idea of what it was like before the process even started — the kind of client who “just needs a little help with the floor plans.” I don’t sit in a hotel room in Boston for two days in the middle of winter, just to have someone tell me how everything worked out just as they planned. The truth is much more entertaining, a lot more flawed, and a lot more useful to me as a professional.Residential design is difficult work. With few exceptions, every client is an amateur. Every design is a testament to who the client thinks she ought to be. Every project is a wrestling match between the things he always wanted and the ones he can afford. The work is not easy.This year at the BuildingEnergy Boston conference in March, a collection of sessions will focus on the difficult parts of residential design, where no one will pretend it always goes perfectly. Let me tell you about them. Andrew Webster is a Certified Passive House Consultant at C&H Architects. This post originally appeared at the website of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association.last_img read more

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Business Leaders Welcome BOJ’s Decision to Demonetize the One, 10 And 25 Cent Coins

first_imgStory Highlights The Bank says while it does not intend to withdraw such a heavily-used denomination from circulation, “we also do not intend to keep producing a non-cost effective coin.” Meanwhile, he encourages persons to utilize the BoJ’s redemption facility to either return coins in their possession directly or donate them to charitable organizations to so do. The Bank of Jamaica’s (BoJ) decision to demonetize the one, 10 and 25 cent coins is being strongly supported by several business leaders.The BoJ, in a statement, cites decreasing demand and high production costs as the principal reasons for this decision, and for opting not to manufacture new ones for issuance to the public to replace those now in circulation after their withdrawal.Having obtained approval from the Finance and Public Service Ministry, the BoJ says the next step, in keeping with the Bank of Jamaica Act [section 16(1)], is for the measure to be gazetted at which time three months’ notice will be provided.The Bank, however, says that at this stage, it anticipates formal demonetization of the coins by the first quarter of 2018.This means that the one, 10 and 25 cent units will no longer be legal tenders, thereby making the $1 the lowest denominated coin in circulation.Additionally, the $1 along with the $5, $10 and $20 will be the only coin denominations issued by the Bank.Against the background of a fall in the cumulative demand for the one, 10 and 25 cent coins from 14.2 to nearly zero per cent and production costs ranging between $1.54 and $1.96 for each unit, based on BoJ review conducted between 2005 and 2016, Jamaica Bankers Association (JBA) President, Nigel Holness, says the decision and timing of the exercise are “absolutely on point.”“Based on the trend that we have seen (where) persons simply discard these coins, it made sense for the BoJ to revisit its position, in terms of issuing these instruments in the market,” he tells JISNoting that this has been the stance of other Central Banks in the Caribbean, and other countries, in relation to underused, low denomination currency, Mr. Holness, who is also Managing Director of CIBC/First Caribbean Bank Jamaica, says there has been a tendency by persons, over time, to deposit the coins in a piggy bank or toss them in the car or a drawer in the office or at home.As such, he says usage has been “very minuscule”, unlike the $1 coin which he points out “is still heavily used and would outweigh the need for pulling that unit.”The BoJ indicates that while it is no longer “economically viable” to manufacture the current $1, which attracts a $2.30 production cost for each unit, the demand for the coin remains “heavy”, at almost 50 per cent.The Bank says while it does not intend to withdraw such a heavily-used denomination from circulation, “we also do not intend to keep producing a non-cost effective coin.”In this regard, it says the unit’s design is being reviewed with a view to using less expensive materials to manufacture it.Mr. Holness, however, does not anticipate any fallout from the withdrawal of the targeted coins. He says in situations where the transactions involve notes and coins, “you would either round down or up to the nearest dollar.”“So if it is under $0.49 you round down and if it’s over $0.50, you round it up to the nearest dollar,” he explains.This is consistent with the recommendation of the BoJ, which indicates that a loss on one side should be compensated with a gain on the other, while assuring that any possible effect on inflation “should be negligible.”Additionally, Mr. Holness points to alternative options to cash payments such as credit and debit cards which, he points out, will continue to be settled using the exact amount billed by a merchant.Meanwhile, he encourages persons to utilize the BoJ’s redemption facility to either return coins in their possession directly or donate them to charitable organizations to so do.“There is a substantial amount of coins out there in the public’s hands which I believe can come to good use and it’s a great opportunity for organizations to generate some form of revenue. I know this has been done in many other countries and it encourages persons to contribute,” he states.While acknowledging that in real value the one, 10 and 25 cent coins are “very small”, Mr. Holness contends that “every little makes a lot.”“So if we can collectively, give the coins to these charitable organizations, it would be a great opportunity for persons to just give back. It takes nothing out of you to just go take out those coins, wherever they are, and give them to these folks to package and send them in. It’s a great way of giving back to the community,” he adds.For his part, Immediate Past President of the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce, Warren McDonald, endorses the BoJ’s decision, arguing that “if the coins are not being used and are costing theCentral Bank, millions to produce, then I don’t think that their continued production is the most efficient way for the (BoJ) to utilize its resources.”He, likewise, does not foresee any fallout from the withdrawals, pointing out that “the Central Bank did its research before coming to this conclusion; so I don’t see any negatives arising from it and it will, in fact, save money.”Small Business Association of Jamaica President, Hugh Johnson, says his organization commends the BoJ on the decision which he describes as more cost-effective, adding that “it is long overdue.”“This should have been done long ago because, for many years now, persons were not able to issue those coins to merchants. Places like the supermarkets were not taking them…nobody was.“Since it is costing more to produce the coins than their actual value; and since it has been established that they are not being used and seem to just be lying around, we applaud the move to withdraw them as this will result in savings to the country,” Mr. Johnson tells JIS News.Chief Executive Officer of Honey Bun Limited, Michelle Chong, supports the BoJ’s position pointing out that “based on the value of those coins, it’s not worth having around.” The Bank of Jamaica’s (BoJ) decision to demonetize the one, 10 and 25 cent coins is being strongly supported by several business leaders.last_img read more

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