Repair works to Ivy Bridge set for coming weeks

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Repair works to Ivy Bridge set for coming weeks Previous articleMagheraroarty Pier allocated €6000 fundingNext article50th Anniversary of Duke Street Civil Rights March to be marked in Derry News Highland Pinterest Pinterest Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Google+ FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Works to repair the Ivy Bridge in Cloghan are set to begin in the coming weeks.Donegal County Council has confirmed a schedule of works to reopen the bridge are due to go out to tender later this month.The bridge has been closed to traffic after part of the parapet wall collapsed a number of weeks back.A second phase of works is due to commence in 2019 and will involve the removal and replacement of the parapet walls of the bridge.Cathaoirleach of the Stranorlar Municipal District, Councillor Patrick McGowan has welcomed the Council’s commitment to a long-term solution for the iconic bridge:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/mcgowanwebbridge.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.center_img Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook Harps come back to win in Waterford Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Google+ By News Highland – October 6, 2018 DL Debate – 24/05/21 last_img read more

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The man with the ‘golden ear’

first_imgIt’s not often that Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow gets rattled. But then, it’s not every day that Clive Davis, the legendary record label executive, producer, and talent nurturer, stops by Wasserstein Hall to reminisce about his illustrious, six-decade career in the music industry.“I have interviewed Supreme Court justices, I’ve been with presidents of countries, I am so nervous!” Minow told Davis, LL.B. ’56, Friday afternoon as they chatted about Davis’ improbable journey as a poor Jewish kid from Brooklyn who made it to Harvard Law School (HLS) on a scholarship and went on to become one of the most successful and revered figures in music business history.“I had no clue that music would be part of my life,” Davis said. “When you have no money, when you get by on scholarships, your work ethic becomes part of it — the fear that if you don’t maintain a certain average you’ll lose your scholarship just creates the drive, the determination, the scared necessity” to constantly push to get ahead in school and then in one’s career.Now chief creative officer at Sony Music Entertainment, Davis, 82, is perhaps the last of the larger-than-life star-makers who once ran the record business. Starting at Columbia Records in the early 1960s, then with Arista Records in the 1970s into the ’90s, and finally, J Records in the 2000s, Davis made his name as a shrewd negotiator who was blessed with “golden ears” for identifying hits and grooming future superstars. The winner of five Grammys, including the Grammy Trustees Lifetime Achievement award, Davis is among the few nonperformers to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.Davis joined Columbia Records’ legal staff just a few years after graduating with honors from HLS. Among his early tasks was to inform the label’s prickly, young folk singer Bob Dylan that lyrics to his “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues,” equating the ultraconservative anti-Communist group with Nazism, were potentially libelous and needed to be rewritten. Dylan, who famously stormed off “The Ed Sullivan Show” set after being told he couldn’t perform the song on live television, refused. Fearing a lawsuit, Columbia yanked the song from his just-shipped album, “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan,” and replacing it with four new tracks, including the future classics “Masters of War” and “Girl From the North Country.” When Dylan tried to void his recording contract not long after, claiming he had been underage when he signed it, Davis successfully kept the headstrong musician from bolting to a competitor.Shortly after rising from general counsel to president in 1967, Davis transformed the stodgy Columbia, known then for its roster of “easy listening” artists like Johnny Mathis, Andy Williams, and Barbra Streisand and its catalogue of Broadway show tunes, into a rock powerhouse, corralling unknowns including Janis Joplin, Santana, Sly Stone and later, Pink Floyd, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, and Aerosmith, among others, into the Columbia stable.After his controversial 1973 firing, Davis headed the newly created Arista Records in 1974, promptly rekindling his reputation for finding pop hit-makers such as Barry Manilow, Carly Simon, and Hall and Oates, while still attracting and supporting edgier, less-commercial artists like Patti Smith and Lou Reed. For every Kenny G or Milli Vanilli the label put out in the 1980s, Arista took chances with unconventional acts like Eurythmics and smartly anticipated the growing popularity of country music by establishing a Nashville outpost and signing Brad Paisley, Alan Jackson, and Brooks & Dunn, among others.By the 1990s, Davis presciently formed joint ventures with Sean “Puffy” Combs’ fledgling Bad Boy Records, home to Notorious B.I.G., and LaFace Records, the label of producers L.A. Reid and Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds. Both would churn out hit after hit, becoming the decade’s top-selling hip-hop and R&B labels, respectively.But Davis was probably best known to the public for his exclusive Grammy parties and his role as consigliore to A-list divas like Aretha Franklin, Dionne Warwick, and the late Whitney Houston, whom he discovered in 1983.In 2000, Davis formed J Records after being forced into retirement by executives at BMG, Arista’s parent company. It was at J that Davis helped revive the careers of Carlos Santana and Rod Stewart while inking up-and-comers like Alicia Keys, Maroon 5, Carrie Underwood, and Kelly Clarkson.Davis, who will appear on NBC’s “The Voice” this week, just finished producing a new release from Franklin and a DVD of Whitney Houston’s best live performances, both out this month.“I do get great pleasure in finding those great talents and showing how long a career can last,” Davis said of his knack for identifying hit songs and helping extend a fading talent’s livelihood. “It doesn’t have to be ephemeral in any way.”With many more HLS students preparing for careers in the arts, business, or as entrepreneurs, Minow asked Davis for his advice to future graduates thinking about these fields. “I really felt the Law School training, on top of the previous education I had, was invaluable to me. The combination of making you think, where you can’t just memorize, and the need for an unrelenting work ethic” at HLS serves everyone well, he said, whether they intend to practice law or to move into business.Davis said streaming music services like Spotify and Pandora pay billions in licensing fees that help to offset the decline in retail music sales, but cautions it’s “too soon” to know what will result from singer Taylor Swift’s recent boycott of Spotify. “The concept of music being free is abhorrent, it’s wrong. The idea that creativity should not be rewarded is so antithetical to our culture. It’s robbing creative people of what their talent deserves in compensation for that.”One thing is sure, though. While “technology does make certain products obsolete,” he said, there’s no truth to the notion that “music is less important in our lives today than it was before.”“That is not the case,” Davis said. “The heartening thing is music is as important as ever.”last_img read more

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Hidden Spaces: Where time stands still

first_img 12Etched in the building directly behind Gordon is Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, now part of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, one of Harvard Medical School’s teaching hospitals. 1Known as the “crown” of the Harvard Medical School (HMS), the Warren Anatomical Museum was a 34-foot-high space at the top of the administration building, now Gordon Hall. 4More than 11, 000 medical instruments and anatomy and pathology specimens were collected throughout the first half of the 20th century. One was the famed “crowbar skull.” An accidental explosion fired a 13-pound tamping iron through the head of New Hampshire construction foreman Phineas Gage. Gage lost one eye, but lived for 13 years afterward. The 3-foot rod and Gage’s skull are now housed with other specimens on the top floor of the Countway Library at the Medical School. 5John C. Warren (pictured) of Beacon Hill was one of five generations of John Warrens at the Medical School, all surgeons or anatomists. He taught anatomy at Harvard and bequeathed his family’s collection of books and pamphlets on medical and scientific subjects. 8“Gordon Hall’s windows,” says architectural historian Amy Finstein, “are an important part of the building’s classical aesthetic, with geometric patterns and symmetry that reinforce the architectural style of the entire HMS design.” 2In 1888, John Shaw Billings, founding director of the National Library of Medicine, called Warren “the best museum connected with a medical school in this country.” “The grandeur of the space in Gordon Hall and its placement as the focal point of the Harvard Medical School quad was a clear statement in 1906 as to its importance as an anatomy and pathology classroom and laboratory.” ― Dominic Hall, curator, Warren Anatomical MuseumOnce a bustling space, Gordon Hall’s upper floors, formerly the Warren Anatomical Museum, are mostly quiet now. The open, sun-filled area was part classroom, part museum for Harvard Medical School students in the first half of the last century. They learned at long tables surrounded by more than 11,000 medical specimens housed in tall glass cases. An enormous skylight runs the length of the room, with windows in the flat part of the ceiling and along the walls. Glass floors on the second story filtered light to the marble-floored level below.As outlined in the museum’s catalog, students studied healthy and morbid anatomy, including organs, crania, bones, and more. During World War II, the windows and skylight were covered for fear of attack. Eventually, offices were constructed around the periphery, taking up floor space and blocking light. The busts of the founders and notables that circled the room and the glass cases filled with anatomical and medical instruments were removed. (Many artifacts are now housed in a mini-museum on the fifth floor of Countway Library near the Harvard Medical Library, another former Gordon tenant.) Better class space was constructed elsewhere on the campus, so the students left, too.What remains in Gordon from those early days are the classic cast-iron pillars and railings and leaded-glass windows, the highest ones decorated with geometric patterns. Framed photographs and historical text on the lower walls remind us of the history of this great space. As Hall said, “The Gordon Hall gallery served as a tangible testament to the historical legacy of Harvard’s physicians and scientists, a mission which the Warren Museum continues to live as part of the Countway Library’s Center for the History of Medicine.” 11Before mid-century changes, additional windows were housed in the flat ceiling on either side of the skylight. These, along with windows in the alcoves on the sides of the room, allowed a flood of natural light, “transforming the interior of the entire upper half of the building into a translucent, almost otherworldly space,” according to author of “A Legacy So Enduring” Nora Nercessian. 9Framed by a decorative upper baluster, a student studies on the lower level. 7Shadows from the geometric-patterned windows are elongated on the wooden floor by a stairwell. 10A large, vaulted east-to-west skylight ceiling runs the entire width of the building. 15In the spirit of Greece, the Campus Beautiful movement of the early 1900s, a subset of the City Beautiful movement, influenced the architecture of the Harvard Medical School. 16If an HMS faculty member dies, the American flag on the roof of Gordon Hall is lowered to half-staff. Security shift supervisor Ray Young said they occasionally fly an important visitor’s country flag; otherwise, the flag rarely comes down. 13The floor of the lower level, Grand Hall, was set in marble, while much of the second-floor gallery was set in steel and glass, allowing light from above to filter to the lower gallery. 14In the mid 1940s, the vaulted skylight was covered for fear of an attack by the Germans. Not until 2001, when the building was renamed Gordon Hall, was the skylight finally uncovered. 6An elder John Warren’s ultimate contribution was his “bones (that they be) carefully preserved, whitened, articulated and placed in the medical college near my bust; affording, I hope, a lesson useful, at the same time, to morality and science …” 3Twenty two-story cast-iron columns encircle the room.last_img read more

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Carter-Williams delivers cathartic performance in Sweet 16 against Indiana just 5 days after fire at home

first_imgWASHINGTON — Michael Carter-Williams’ season has straddled the line between spectacular and subpar, dazzling and disappointing. He’s been a hero in some games, the culprit in others. With Syracuse’s season on the line, in a game against one of the best teams in the nation, Carter-Williams was everything the Orange needed him to be.Aggressive in the lane. Confident from the arc. Relentless on defense.Carter-Williams scored 24 points on 9-of-19 shooting, including a 3-of-6 performance from the perimeter, to help lead fourth-seeded Syracuse (29-9) to a 61-50 win over No. 1-seed Indiana (29-7) in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament at the Verizon Center in Washington. He used his lengthy frame to his advantage on Thursday night, giving the undersized Indiana guards a seemingly impossible task in trying to defend him. And he did all of this less than one week after his home in Hamilton, Mass., caught fire and forced his family out of its home for the foreseeable future.“We’ve been going through some tough times and I’m just trying to bring a smile to my family’s faces and have them enjoy themselves,” Carter-Williams said.Carter-Williams finished with only one assist Thursday, but he took care of the bulk of the scoring.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhether it was a fast-break layup he made in the game’s opening minutes, or a 3-pointer he hit from the left wing that gave Syracuse a 14-5 lead, Carter-Williams asserted himself as the Orange’s most dangerous threat on this night. He reaffirmed that when he nailed a contested 3 from the top of the key, just before falling to the ground from the contact he absorbed, to give Syracuse a commanding 27-11 lead.Head coach Jim Boeheim said he told Carter-Williams earlier in the game to take a 3 even though he didn’t think he’d make it. But if it gave Indiana the idea that he was going to shoot, the Hoosiers would have to defend him outside, which would open up the middle. To Boeheim’s surprise and Syracuse’s benefit, and to the Hoosiers’ frustration, he made it — plus two more.“He made a couple of them and he’s a different player when he can make that shot,” Boeheim said. “We couldn’t get assists because they weren’t coming off.”Carter-Williams didn’t need to create assists.It’s been a strange season for the sophomore guard. He’s had brilliant games like this one and a 15-point, 12-assist performance against Providence on Feb. 20. He’s also had forgettable games, including a dreadful one against Temple where he missed eight free throws and shouldered the brunt of the blame for Syracuse losing to the Owls.Against Georgetown in the Big East tournament, he had only three points on 1-of-7 shooting, and also committed six turnovers.Through all the struggles, Carter-Williams said he remained confident, believing he was a better player than any of those nights that might depict otherwise. He’s also had assistant coach Gerry McNamara constantly in his ear, reminding him of everything he can do.“When I watch him play and I watch him late in games this year, he’s never afraid to make plays or make mistakes,” McNamara said after Thursday’s win. “To me, that’s being a leader. That’s taking responsibility. I’ve kind of just reassured him of that. I’ve told him over and over that he sets the tone for us.”Against Indiana, that tone was aggressiveness, and the Hoosiers couldn’t match it. Carter-Williams repeatedly sliced through Indiana’s defense, drove the lane through traffic, and made tough layups. When he had good looks on the arc, he knocked down big 3s.His four steals at the other end of the floor only added even more to his heroics.Carter-Williams’ final 3-pointer gave SU a 51-37 lead with just over nine minutes left in the game. As he dribbled the ball at the top of the key and directed his teammates on Syracuse’s next possession, the Orange’s fans began clapping and cheering for SU’s sure-handed leader.When the game was over, Carter-Williams went over to see his smiling mother, just five days after her heartache. On Thursday, Carter-Williams delivered a performance that elicited euphoria.“He’s been very aggressive for us, he’s knocking down some shots,” forward C.J. Fair said. “I’m glad he had his coming out party today at the right point in time.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 29, 2013 at 2:48 am Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_isemanlast_img read more

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A bowl bid still counts for something

first_img“Goal Line Stand” ran Mondays. If you would like to comment on this story, visit DailyTrojan.com or email Michael at [email protected] Conference championship Saturday has come and gone. The BCS selection show came and went. What did both of these television programs have in common?Neither of them involved USC.If you had told me when the season began that USC would be playing Georgia Tech in a bowl game, I’d have guessed the Trojans got a BCS at-large bid to the Fiesta Bowl or the Orange Bowl and that Georgia Tech had a breakout season.The Sun Bowl? Against a 6-7 Yellow Jackets squad that had to petition for bowl eligibility?It’s not exactly what anyone expected.No, everyone in this area of Los Angeles had dreams of flying to Miami or, at the very least, playing in the Rose Bowl with the hometown fans yelling at the top of their lungs.But it was not to be.For a number of reasons, including but not limited to poor defensive lapses, inopportune turnovers and a tough schedule, the Trojans limped to a 7-5 season. It has been a year where many, including myself, have asked, “How could a team this talented fall flat on its face?” In fact, I’m still wondering.But when all is said and done and the Trojans take the field in El Paso, Texas, I can honestly say the season won’t have been a waste. Disappointing? Absolutely. I thought this team would finish 11-1 or 10-2 at the worst. I’m not much of a flyer, either, so flying out to Texas isn’t really my idea of a vacation, to be honest.Given USC is coming off sanctions that prohibited them from going to a bowl during the last two seasons, going to the Sun Bowl isn’t so bad. For the first time since 2009, senior quarterback Matt Barkley gets to play a game after the first week of December. Sophomore wide receiver Marqise Lee can add to his incredible receiving totals and dazzle us with more highlight reel plays.But more importantly, USC is once again relevant. Some schools dream of going to a bowl game — any bowl game. I watched Pittsburgh take on South Florida yesterday, in a game where Pitt was fighting for that elusive sixth win. I’m sure Auburn, who won the national title in 2010 and went 3-9 this season, would have given anything to go to a bowl game. Schools like Kent State haven’t been to a bowl game since the 1970s.I know USC fans are upset, but in the grand scheme of things, the fact the Trojans are even playing in the postseason is wonderful, especially given the NCAA penalties that have made it tough to practice and put together a deep roster. Things looked oh-so-dark for what seemed like an eternity. Would USC ever be eligible? It seemed like it would be decades until the 2012 season came.Now we’re here. And after two years that saw fans agonize during bowl week and cheer vicariously through other teams, a berth in the Sun Bowl is pretty darn good. It’s something. It’s what USC fans have wanted for two years, even if they didn’t know it.Last season, USC’s 10-2 record got them nowhere (except a lot of preseason hype and All-American honors). Everyone wondered how good the team actually was. Could they compete with Alabama? With LSU?We never found out.This team went 7-5. We know how good this USC team is: It is good enough to play in a mid-level bowl game. There will be no more questions; 2012 USC is good enough to play in the postseason in a non-BCS game. And that’s OK.Playing in a bowl game is a privilege many teams have never experienced and might not for many years. As students, we rightly or wrongly expect the squad to walk into the Rose Bowl every New Year’s day and take on a Big Ten team. But it doesn’t really work like that, does it?There can only be one national champion and one national championship game. There are 34 bowl games. Does that mean the other 33 bowls are worthless? Absolutely not. Only one team gets to hoist a crystal trophy, after all. But bowl season gets teams motivated. It allows fans one more chance to put on their school colors and cheer (or heckle).It’s upsetting to many that it isn’t USC that will be holding the trophy. But given where USC has been in the last few years, any bowl game is a welcome sight. It will be welcomed. The players will be excited. People will surely watch. Barkley will likely get his swan song.Surely, there will be “what ifs” about the 2012 Trojans. There were a lot of games that ended so closely. They could have beaten Stanford or Arizona or even Notre Dame. But they didn’t. And USC’s record and bowl game indicate this.We have closure. We know exactly where USC stands. They will be playing in the Sun Bowl. And if you ask me, there’s nothing wrong with that. It’s the postseason, after all.last_img read more

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Sumner Newscow weekly poll: The Hillary vs. Trump question

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (32) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +6 Vote up Vote down I.B. Well · 233 weeks ago If you don’t vote, then you have no right to complain about how the country is being run. Report Reply 15 replies · active 232 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Turkeyleg · 233 weeks ago It’s sad that people would vote for Trump but I think people are sick and tired of lifelong welfare politicians and their lies. I wouldn’t vote for Clinton and the reason is just two words, Marc Rich. She say’s she hates Wall Street but she and her hubby don’t show it. Report Reply 3 replies · active 233 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Phoebe lord · 233 weeks ago Thanks for reminding me why I moved from Wellington. Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago +4 Vote up Vote down Jeremy · 233 weeks ago Well let’s see one has an ego the size of texas, one has an entitlement atitude, one lies about every thing, one is arrogant, one thinks the other is wrong on every level………now tell me who’s who. My point neither party is right both parties car only about the 1% if your the other 99% well bad news both want to keep you there so you are forced to rely on entitlements to survive. I vote do I feel it makes a difference no mostly because I don’t have the funds to buy the vote for the politician I like. So here’s the solution. Do it for yourself don’t listen to promises made by your parties nomination. When a dog or any other animal is backed into a corner they fight back. Humans are the only ones who will back down and accept what our government dishes out. Why? It easier to go along and get along. Fighting takes guts.fighting takes energy. Fighting takes having no fear even though the outcome may be bad. You fight Report Reply 1 reply · active 233 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Thirsty · 233 weeks ago It is all rigged! Why do you think we lose more and more freedom every single term. We are being conditioning for a takeover by China or Russia. Just wait for it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Turkeyleg · 233 weeks ago Psssst…..Don’t tell Kobach or Brownback……I voted twice on this…..once on my laptop then once on my kids laptop…… : ) Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago +3 Vote up Vote down Guest · 233 weeks ago It is a sad time in the USA that we are placed in this position. Educate yourselves with facts and not innuendo and then vote your conscience,not the party. If this is the “best” America can do fill political leadership we are in for a very rough next 4 years. Remember, your vote makes a difference–don’t let a bad choice stop you. Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down ERIC · 233 weeks ago TRUMP ALLL THE WAY WE DONT NEED ANYMORE OBAMAS CRAP AND THAT WOULD WOULD HAPPEN IF CLINTON GETS IN! Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 233 weeks ago No way I’m voting for Monica’s ex boyfriends wife. Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago -1 Vote up Vote down paddedroom · 233 weeks ago A vote for the lesser of two evils is still a vote for evil. Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments If the general election was held tomorrow and it was Hillary vs. Trump, how would you vote? Donald Trump Hillary Clinton I would stay home. View Results  Loading …Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

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