Indiana Law Schools Remain Predominantly White But Women Are Gaining Ground

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare December 26, 2017Marilyn Odendahl  for TheIndianaLawyer However, the racial and gender mix of students from 2015 to 2017 differed at both schools.IU Maurer’s minority enrollment ticked up in 2016 but slumped 4 percentage points to 17.4 percent in 2017. At IU McKinney, minorities have held steady at roughly 18 percent of the student population from 2015 through 2017. Both schools have charted a steady increase in the percentage of women with the balance tipping and females gaining a slender majority at IU McKinney in 2017.At Valparaiso, women continued to outnumber men, although the gap has narrowed to 49.1 percent and 50.0 percent, respectively. Also, while the northwest Indiana institution still sustains the highest percentage of minority students of all the law schools in the state, as the number of students at Valparaiso has declined so has the percentage of minorities. In 2015, minorities composed 38.3 percent of the student body at Valparaiso while they currently comprise 28.6 percent.Notre Dame Law School bucked the trend a little bit. Its student body has increased by 19 students since 2015 but the composition stayed mostly male and white.Among the students, Black or African Americans and Hispanics have either been the largest or second largest minority group at IU Maurer, IU McKinney and Valparaiso since 2015. At Notre Dame, Hispanics have been the dominate minority for the past three years and Asians have consistently been the second highest minority.The 2017 statistics from the individual schools are as follows:IU Maurer had a total of 505 students in 2017. Of that, the number of men was 267 (52.9 percent) and women was 237 (46.9 percent). Racially, 352 (69.7 percent) were white and 88 (17.4 percent) were minority with the largest minority group being Black or African American.IU McKinney had a total enrollment of 783 students in 2017. Of the entire student body, men numbered 391 (49.9 percent) and women number 392 (50.0) percent. Also 628 (80.2 percent) were white and 140 (17.9 percent) were minority with Black or African American being the biggest minority group.Valparaiso had a total enrollment of 234 students in 2017. Of that, men numbered 115 (49.1 percent) and women numbers 119 (50.9 percent. Also, 161 (68.8 percent) were white and 67 (28.6 percent) were minority. The largest minority group was Hispanic.Notre Dame has a total of 600 students in 2017. The student body consisted of 333 (55.5 percent) men and 270 (45 percent) women. Also, 412 (69.7 percent) were white and 157 (26.2percent) were minority.Statistics for 2016 and 2015 are as follows:In 2016, the IU Maurer had 525 students of which 68.8 percent were white and 21.5 percent were minority while 55.4 percent were men and 44.4 percent were women. In 2015, the Bloomington school had 538 students. The composition was 69.7 percent white and 20.3 percent minority along with 57.1 percent men and 42.8 percent women.In 2016, the IU McKinney has 804 students of which 79.6 percent was white and 18.5 percent was minority. Also, men comprised 51.1 percent of the student body and women 48.9 percent. In 2015, the Indianapolis school had 816 students. Of that, 80.9 percent was white and 17.8 percent was minority while 53.2 percent were men and 46.8 percent were women.In 2016, Notre Dame had 599 students. Of that 68.8 percent white and 26.2 percent minority while 55.6 percent were men and 44.4 percent were women. In 2015, the South Bend school had 581 students of which 68.5 percent were white and 25.3 percent were minority while 58.7 percent were men and 41.3 percent were women.In 2016 Valparaiso had 346 students. The composition was 66.5 percent white and 30.3 percent minority while 48.3 percent were men and 51.7 percent were women. In 2015, the northwest Indiana school had 433 students. Of that, 59.1 percent was white and 38.3 was minority while 49 percent were men and 51 percent were women.center_img Three of Indiana’s four law schools have shrunk in recent years but overall, minority enrollment has slipped while the number of women has been increasing since 2015, according to the recently released in the Fall 2017 Standard 509 Reports from the American Bar Association.Indiana University Maurer School of Law, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law and Valparaiso Law School all welcomed smaller classes in 2016 and 2017 compared to 2015. Valparaiso posted the most significant decrease, cutting the size of its student body by just under 200.  Both IU Maurer and IU McKinney reduced their enrollments by a total 33 students, each, since 2015.last_img read more

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Peruvian Army Commander Visits Military Units in the US

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati/Diálogo March 12, 2019 Far from being his first visit to the United States, it was a particularly significant one. In late February, General Jorge Orlando Céliz Kuong concluded his first trip to the United States—where he completed a Master in Business Administration— since assuming command over the Peruvian Army in November 2018. “This trip is extremely important to me and my staff who joins me, because it will help the institutional transformation process we are conducting in Peru,” Gen. Céliz told Diálogo. “Here, for instance, we see how the United States develops this same process, something that they have come far in implementing already.” Activities kicked off with a bilateral meeting with Major General Mark Stammer, commander of U.S. Army South (ARSOUTH), at Fort Sam Houston. Gen. Céliz was accompanied by a Peruvian Army delegation including: Lieutenant General Walter Enrique Astudillo Chávez, commander of Army Education and Doctrine; Major General Julio Cesar Castañeda Zegarra, commandant of Army Education and Doctrine; and Major General Edwin Patterson Monsalve, command general secretary. To conclude the meeting, Gen. Céliz and Maj. Gen. Stammer planned another bilateral meeting in April to discuss a potential ARSOUTH-sponsored regional conference hosted by Peru. Center for the Intrepid As part of the visit, Gen. Céliz stopped at the Center for the Intrepid. Located within the Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) in Fort Sam Houston, the cutting-edge medical rehabilitation clinic offers therapy, treatments, and reintegration services to U.S. military personnel. According to U.S. Army Brigadier General George Appenzeller, BAMC commander, the clinic was initially founded to assist U.S. service members who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. “Veterans from previous conflicts are also eligible to receive treatment, as well as military personnel who sustained injuries in other operations, training exercises, or non-combat situations,” he said. Military medicine At ARSOUTH, Gen. Céliz gave a presentation on the vision, guidelines, and current transformation process of his army. “We are committed to modernizing, creating real and effective capabilities, becoming a multi-mission army, however, always in compliance with the security needs of our society,” he said. Gen. Céliz also pointed out interoperability as a strategic effort between the armed forces and police to facilitate the fight against challenges that “affect nearly all nations of the Southern Hemisphere, such as narcotrafficking.” The Peruvian delegation also visited the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Health Readiness Center of Excellence (AMEDDCS HRCoE). “The center is where the Army Medical Department formulates its medical organization, tactics, doctrine, and equipment. The school is where the Army educates and trains all its medical personnel,” said Oscar Ramos-Rivera, director of the International Programs Division at AMEDDCS HRCoE. As part of the visit, U.S. air medical pilots treated the Peruvian delegation to flight simulations in combat environments. Gen. Céliz concluded his stay in Fort Sam Houston meeting with various high-ranking U.S. officers to conduct initial agreements for training, non-reciprocal exchanges, and emergency treatments for members of the Peruvian Army. The delegation continued on to Columbus, Georgia, to visit Fort Benning. Military life and family balance In Georgia, the Peruvian delegation started its visit with a private meeting with Major General Gary Brito, commander of the U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence. The institution teaches and trains future members of units to be deployed to various U.S. combatant commands worldwide. Gen. Céliz showed special interest in learning about the center’s efforts to improve family and military life balance. The Peruvian delegation also visited the U.S. Army’s 198th Infantry Brigade—which strives to transform civilians into soldiers—and the warehouse where Stryker tanks are stored. There, Peruvian officers learned how to operate what U.S. service members refer to as “a platform of capabilities, not just a warfare vehicle.” The U.S. Army heavily relies on the Stryker family of armored vehicles for exercises and operational missions. WHINSEC A visit to the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC) was a must while in Georgia. Gen. Céliz, a WHINSEC instructor in the late ‘90s, caught up with former colleagues and conducted a lecture for the WHINSEC Command and General Staff Officer course on the Peruvian Army’s main challenges. “This institutional transformation is a very difficult and challenging initiative. Some things can be done immediately at no cost, such as shifting mentality or changing organizational culture,” Gen. Céliz concluded. “It’s important to know what other armies do, especially the U.S. Army, to analyze possible takeaways or what can be adapted for Peru. This trip was very productive.”last_img read more

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Women’s Basketball: Badgers look to patch up rocky start to new year versus Penn State

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin women’s basketball team entered 2019 with a respectable 10–4 record, including wins against Pittsburgh and Purdue. As the season picks up, the Badgers (10-8, 1-5 Big Ten) will look to improve upon their last-place record in the Big Ten. So far, however, Wisconsin has been off to a cold start in 2019.After defeating Purdue at home on New Year’s Eve, the Badgers have now dropped four straight games to begin the new year, falling to Big Ten foes Penn State, No. 22 Iowa, No. 25 Indiana and Border Battle rival No. 23 Minnesota. Wisconsin has now lost eight of its last 12 games following a promising 6-0 start to the season.The Badgers 28-point loss to the Golden Gophers (13-4, 2-4) this past Thursday was its worst of the season, as Minnesota dominated a sluggish Wisconsin team from start to finish. The Gophers shot 49 percent from the field, knocking down six of 10 three-pointers in the process. In contrast, UW shot just 38.5 percent from the field and went 2-9 from beyond the arch, a season-low in both three-pointers made and attempted.Wisconsin’s usually stout defense could not contain Minnesota guard Kenisha Bell, who dominated with 25 points to lead all scorers. Minnesota out-rebounded the Badgers 37-28, and garnered 18 assists compared to Wisconsin’s eight.Perhaps most daunting from Thursday’s game is the reality that the Badgers shot better from the field than they did from the free throw line (38.1 percent).Women’s basketball: Former walk-on gives back to community with enthusiasmWisconsin Badgers fifth-year senior Lexy Richardson is leaving a lasting impression not only on her fellow teammates but on the Read…Nevertheless, UW will look to get its season back on track when it hosts Penn State (9-8, 2-4) Jan. 24 at the Kohl Center.The last time these two teams met was Jan. 3 in Happy Valley, Pa., where the Badgers fell 71–64. Though it feels like a quick turnaround to play the same team again, Head Coach Johnathan Tsipis and his team will look to use this to their advantage with that tough loss still fresh in their minds.Senior forward Marsha Howard led the Badgers in scoring in their first matchup. However, it was Penn State’s Teniya Page who led all scorers with 23 points, and who led the Nittany Lions to victory. Wisconsin will have to pay extra attention to Page — the Big Ten’s second-leading scorer — come Thursday.For the Badgers to redeem themselves, they will have to do a better job limiting the Nittany Lions’ second-chance opportunities. Penn State hauled in 17 offensive rebounds and scored 14 second-chance points in the teams’ first meeting. Forcing Penn State into one-shot possessions could prove to be a deciding factor.Football: After season of heartbreak, Wisconsin finds redemption in 35-3, Pinstripe Bowl win over MiamiAfter a Badger football season plagued by injuries which hampered preseason expectations, the University of Wisconsin football team (7-5) finished Read…The Badgers should also aim to limit their fouls and not allow Penn State too many trips to the foul line. The Nittany Lions have the third-best free throw shooting percentage in the Big Ten. Limiting points in the paint and forcing Penn State into outside shots will also be critical for the Badger defense, as Penn State made only five three-pointers in their first meeting at a 25 percent clip.Despite boasting one of the Big Ten’s top rebounding duos in Howard and freshman forward Imani Lewis, as well as one of the conference’s premier defenses, the Badger offense has struggled mightily this season. Wisconsin ranks 13th in the Big Ten in field goal percentage, three-point percentage and turnover margin.Though this team identifies with their defensive play, Wisconsin cannot expect to win games without consistent offensive production. As the season moves along, the Badgers have to shoot the ball better and improve their free throw shooting, which currently ranks dead-last in the Big Ten at a skimpy 53 percent.Entering the second half of the season on a four-game losing streak is certainly not what the Badgers or Tsipis had hoped for, but with only Big Ten games remaining on their schedule, Wisconsin will look to boost its stock in hopes of a postseason run and its first NCAA Tournament since 2010. Some key games to watch for: Jan. 31 at No. 9 Maryland, Feb. 14 vs. No. 17 Michigan State and Feb. 25 at No. 20 Rutgers.Tip-off is set for 8 p.m. on Thursday Jan. 24 the Kohl Center. The game can be viewed on BTN plus or listened to on 100.9 FM.last_img read more

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