On-Demand Music Service MOG Comes to the Living Room – Mobile Apps Coming Soon

first_imgfrederic lardinois MOG, the increasingly popular on-demand music service, just announced its first hardware partnership. MOG’s users can now access the service from their Roku players in the living room. Last week, Drew Denbo, the company’s senior vice president of business development, told us that MOG believes that as Internet-connected devices like the Roku become more popular, users will finally be able to take their online entertainment options beyond the desktop and into the living room. On the Roku player, MOG users will be able to access their libraries, playlists and artist radio stations. PricingRoku users who sign up for the company’s unlimited $4.99 monthly plan will be able to use the service on their devices. For $9.99 per month, these users will also be able to access the service through the web interface. MOG will also offer a free 3-day trial to Roku owners. In addition, users who sign up for the $9.99 plan will also soon be able to use the company’s iPhone and Android apps. These apps will allow users to download songs to their mobile devices for offline playing. We got an early look at MOG’s iPhone app earlier this year. You can find more details here.Why Are Music Subscription Services are Getting More Popular Now?MOG is strictly a subscription-based service. So far, these services always remained in the shadow of more traditional music stores like iTunes and eMusic. Now, however, there seems to be a resurgence in interest in music subscription services. With Rdio, for example, Skype’s founders just launched a new subscription service that looks quite similar to MOG. According to MOG’s Drew Denbo, a number of fundamental changes are driving this trend. First of all, the arrival of mobile app stores has made it easier for these services to target mobile devices and give users the option to access their music anywhere. In addition, now that some of these services are arriving in the living room (thanks to the Roku and devices like Logitech’s Squeezebox), music subscription services are getting to the point where they are more convenient to use than download services. At the same time, though, there will always be some users who want to own their music, so subscription services aren’t for everyone, but unlike download services, streaming music services are making it increasingly easy for their users to access their music wherever they are. 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Related Posts 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…center_img Tags:#mobile#music#news#web 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe Applast_img read more

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Stretchable Batteries Could Power Devices Embedded In The Body [Video]

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#mobile devices The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology christina ortiz What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … “Flexible means the device could be bent or twisted, which essentially requires the device to be very thin. Stretchable represents a more challenging type of mechanics, which requires that the device must accommodate a large strain deformation, including not only bending, twisting, but also stretching and compressing.” The two could possibly go hand in hand, say in a nifty new watch design from a well known tech giant, but successful flexible devices will require more than mere flexibility. As mobile devices become more and more like physical attachments, they will have to move like our own skin, stretchy and flexible.A report from Bloomberg News about the possible Apple iWatch says that it may take about three years to be able to develop glass flexible enough to curve or even wrap around someone’s wrist. While Apple and others work on making flexible mobile devices a reality, they may also want to take a look at adding some stretchiness to the product development. Image courtesy of Northwestern University. Finally, they were able to come up with “pop-up” technology that allows the circuits to bend and twist. Typically, circuits inside of batteries are rigid, but creating bridges using metal wiring to connect the elements gives the circuits the ability to stretch and flex along with any device. The power in the metal bridges works its way through the circuits to power the battery.  Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Its life span is about 20 charging cycles – and it can be recycled just like any other lithium-ion battery. Due to its small size, it can hold a charge for only eight to nine hours, but the battery charges wirelessly using coils that induce charging through an external source. This makes it ideal for use in medical devices embedded in the body. ‘Flexible’ And ‘Stretchable’ Are Distant Cousins It seems like a stretchable battery would be attractive for the flexible device market, but Huang says the two aren’t as alike as one would think. In an email to ReadWrite, Huang said that while the OLED displays from Nokia and Samsung are flexible, they aren’t stretchable. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Two years ago, Nokia made waves when it displayed a concept phone using a flexible OLED display. Samsung and Ericsson have shown similar prototypes. So flexible devices and displays are on the market horizon. But they’re still just a first step toward a new class of future devices that can not just flex, but actually stretch – so they can be safely and comfortably implanted in the body, for example.   In a video (below), Huang and Rogers demo the battery by hooking it up to an LED light and slowly stretching it out. The battery was able to reach about 300% of its original size and still provide power. Once stretched, the battery can regain its original size without damage to the circuits.  So what is the prognosis for these “stretchable” devices? One piece of the puzzle has recently been developed in a partnership between Northwestern University and the University of Illinois: a stretchable lithium-ion battery. The “Stretch Armstrong” of Batteries It took Yonggang Huang and John A. Rogers, from Northwestern and University of Illinois, respectively, six years to develop a cordless power supply that was versatile enough to be used in stretchable electronics, particularly devices used inside the human body. last_img read more

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