The Cynthia Wight Rossano Endowed Prize Fund

first_imgA new endowed prize fund, established by Daniel Pierce ’56, has been named in honor of Cynthia Wight Rossano for her services to Harvard University and to commemorate Harvard’s history. The Cynthia Wight Rossano Prize in Harvard History awards the best essay by a Harvard College undergraduate. Drawing upon primary sources, the essays must consider any aspect of Harvard history, contribute scholarly knowledge, and must be no longer than 10 pages. A multimedia presentation by a single Harvard student may be submitted in place of an essay.Essays or presentations must be submitted no later than May 1 to the Office of the University Marshal, Wadsworth House. Judging the prize will be University Marshal Jackie O’Neill; the Rev. Professor Peter J. Gomes, the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church; and a professor in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to be chosen by committee members. Judges reserve the right not to award the prize in any year when submissions do not meet their standards. The prize amount will be set annually by the committee of judges.For more information, visit the Office of the University Marshal Web site.last_img read more

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Anything to Win: Are elite trail runners using performance enhancing drugs?

first_imgBarry Bonds. Lance Armstrong. Marion Jones. Some of the biggest names in sport have become synonymous with scandal, having been investigated or banned for using performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs). No one publicly condones the use of steroids or other banned substances, but when millions of dollars and eternal glory are on the line, it’s not hard to see how some may find themselves on a slippery slope of self-enhancement, with the potential side effect of self-destruction.It’s not always high-stakes athletes who are willing to cheat, either. Amateur athletes have increasingly been turning to performance enhancing drugs (PEDs). Trail running has exploded in popularity over the past decade, and with more sponsorships and attention have come more allegations of blood doping. Are elite trail runners juiced up?During the 2015 Ultratrail du Mont-Blanc competition, Gonzalo Calistos tested positive for Erythropoietin (EPO), a hormone that helps the blood carry more oxygen to the cells. That same year, Elisa Desco entered the 50-mile The North Face (TNF) Endurance Challenge, three years after completing a ban for testing positive for EPO in 2009. Many athletes were outraged, claiming that she shouldn’t have been allowed to compete due to her record, even though her ban had been fully served.Both athletes maintain their innocence and say they didn’t knowingly take performance-enhancing drugs. Calistos suggested that his Ecuadorean background and regular exposure to high altitudes might explain his atypical blood profile, but neither the International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) nor the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) have commented on that. Dr. Chris Harnish, a trail runner and exercise physiologist, believes more comprehensive data, such as from “anonymous surveys and some random drug testing” versus isolated incidents, are necessary to determine the true state of doping in trail running.However, with PEDs being relatively easy to purchase and so few races implementing drug testing, it is definitely possible that PED use is “a lot more rampant than we realize,” says Dr. Harnish. In response, some runners have been taking matters into their own hands. Testing is irregular in this blossoming sport partially because it is prohibitively expensive, but in 2016, Paul Kirsche and David Roche started the website runcleangetdirty.org, where runners can pledge their commitment to being substance-free.The North Face (TNF) is taking a stand of its own. Their new policy states not only that athletes serving a ban will be unable to participate in their Endurance Challenge Series events, but also that athletes who have completed a ban, while able to compete, will be ineligible for “prize money, awards, podium recognition, or rankings.”  They will also be barred from the elite field.The mere existence of this policy denotes the need for regulation in a growing sport. Maeve Sloane, TNF’s Performance Sports Marketing Manager, admits that “as any sport grows, so does the number of issues that arise,” but at the moment TNF doesn’t believe doping incidents are growing at an “alarming rate.” Still, TNF has joined Hobbs and the ATRA to set forth a plan for the coming years and raise awareness of the issue.Will the new policy make much of a difference? Sloane acknowledged that the Endurance Challenge Series would not start testing its competitors, and many are left asking: What good is banning illegal substances if there’s no testing? Anne Riddle, a trail runner with over 25 years of experience, thinks that athletes will realize “they are likely to get away with it…until drug testing is more common.” However, both she and Michael Owen, the SE Ohio Trail Runners race director, don’t see testing becoming common in the near future due to the expense.“With participation growth, and competition depth growth, we will surely see more people trying to gain an advantage illegally,” says Owen. “I don’t let it affect me—there are so many people who run ultra’s for their own reasons. 99.9% of us don’t do it for the money. We’d be cheating ourselves of a pure experience.”People get into trail running to challenge themselves or just try something new. It’s seen as a pure sport, more closely connected to nature than many others, and perhaps that’s why the idea of doping hits such a raw nerve with some participants.For the most part, however, many runners at the recreational level feel that the issue is being blown out of proportion. “It’s not a common thing,” notes Scott Dunlap, a 12-time national trail running champion and writer of A Trail Runner’s Blog. He fears that “the more [a few runners] talk about it, the more people outside the sport think it really is a considerable factor.”Nancy Hobbs, Executive Director of the American Trail Running Association, agrees that some “vocal runners” are drawing unnecessary attention to the issue. “It’s like a whisper down the alley,” she speculates of individuals who are suspicious of how well others are doing. While testing is “a good thing to do,” Hobbs says, what’s more important is to educate runners about performance-enhancing drugs and how testing works.This would help avoid accidental use of banned substances, which can be found in pretty unlikely places. One athlete wound up serving a six-month ban thanks to an ingredient in a medication meant to treat menopausal symptoms. If runners at every level knew what to look out for, Hobbs explains, they could talk to their doctors to ensure that medications for legitimate health issues wouldn’t land them on the banned list.With new policies and growing awareness, Sloane is optimistic about trail running’s future. “As more brands and races adopt clean sport policies, it will continuously become more difficult to get away with doping.”last_img read more

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Record rent for Dublin offices

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Boeing to resume Max production before flight ban is lifted

first_imgBoeing will resume production of the 737 Max before the best-selling plane is allowed back in the air as the company attempts to recover from one of the worst crises in its 104-year history.The Chicago-based manufacturer halted production in January, 10 months after the jet was grounded worldwide following two crashes that killed 346 people. Boeing failed to sell any commercial planes in January, the second month with no orders since the flying ban was imposed.Boeing expects global regulators to start clearing the aircraft to fly in the middle of this year, though senior sales executive Ihssane Mounir said Wednesday at the Singapore Airshow that the timings of their decisions may be different. Vice president of commercial marketing, Randy Tinseth, outlined the timetable to restart manufacturing and said any resumption would begin slowly. Topics : The timing is a balancing act for Boeing. A prolonged suspension of manufacturing would put extra stress on jobs, supply chains and future airplane orders. At the same time, prematurely restarting production would only add to the 700 Max jets already on the tarmac, a backlog that Boeing says will take several quarters to clear.Mounir said no customers were scrapping 737 Max fleet plans. Boeing is also in talks over widebody aircraft and expects to secure some orders soon, he said.Spirit AeroSystems Holdings, a maker of fuselage, engine pylons and wing components that depends on the Max for half of its sales, has slashed its dividend to preserve cash and laid off 2,800 employees.Tinseth mapped out some of the other elements of Boeing’s plan to get the Max flying again. He reiterated the manufacturer will help train Max pilots on simulators as part of the compensation packages for airline customers.While Boeing expects the Max to fly again mid-2020, regulators that are reviewing a fix to the jet’s flight-control software — implicated in both crashes — will have the final word. In Singapore on Tuesday, Federal Aviation Administration head Steve Dickson said there’s no schedule for the Max’s recertification flight.The 737 is a workhorse for airlines globally plying short- to medium-haul routes on fast turnarounds. The importance of getting the Max back in the air was underscored by Boeing’s market forecast for Southeast Asia, a region it said will need 4,500 new aircraft worth $710 billion over the next two decades to meet demand from a growing middle class.At a briefing in Singapore on Wednesday, Mounir said the coronavirus hasn’t had an impact on supply chains yet, but some deliveries for Chinese customers have been held up in Seattle. He also said Boeing is a little over a year away from entering the 777X into service. The long-range widebody aircraft, which is so big that its wings are hinged, completed its first successful test flight last month.last_img read more

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