New York State Pension Fund Sets 2040 Goal of Net Zero Carbon Emissions

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Timothy Gardner and Sohini PodderThe New York state pension fund on Wednesday committed to help curb climate change by transitioning its investments to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2040, making it the first U.S. pension fund to set the goal by that date.New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said the move will put the fund, the third largest in the country, in a strong position for the future of a green economy mapped out in the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate.President-elect Joe Biden has pledged to rejoin the Paris accord soon after his inauguration on Jan. 20.The fund will review its energy company investments for their ability to provide returns in light of the need to take action to curb climate change, he said.“Those that fail to meet our minimum standards may be removed from our portfolio,” DiNapoli said in a statement.Divestment is a “last resort,” he said, but it is also a tool the fund can use to push companies to invest in technologies that reduce emissions.The New York state Common Retirement Fund, which has an estimated valuation of about $226 billion, is wrapping up its evaluation of nine oil sands companies, mainly in Canada and Russia, and will develop minimum standards for investments in shale oil and gas.This will be followed by a review of sectors including integrated oil and gas, oil and gas exploration, production, storage and transportation. The fund had about $2.6 billion invested in fossil fuels as of September.The state fund joins a growing list of financial sector players who are cutting their exposure to carbon intensive projects and companies.It has already set minimum standards for the thermal coal mining industry and divested from about $40 million from 22 coal companies, DiNapoli said.The fund has a climate solutions plan to double investments in things like wind and solar power to $20 billion this decade and so far has about $11 billion invested, DiNapoli said.The fund will decide which companies are suitable to remain in its portfolio by 2025.Environmentalists praised the move.“We hope this commitment … will help to inspire and ratchet up ambition across the broader investment community,” said Mindy Lubber, head of the sustainability nonprofit Ceres.(Reporting by Sohini Podder and Noor Zainab Hussain in Bengaluru and Timothy Gardner in Washington; Editing by Krishna Chandra Eluri, Bill Berkrot and Marguerita Choy)last_img read more

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LeBron James’ offseason won’t include FIBA World Cup, but 2020 Olympics still possible

first_imgDepending on how James feels next season, though, he might still represent his country one more time. He said he hasn’t made a decision yet about the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.  The early end to LeBron James’ NBA season will provide the Lakers star far more free time this summer than he has had in nearly a decade, but he won’t fill it with more basketball. The Lakers announced Saturday that James has been shut down for the rest of the season so he can allow a nagging groin injury to heal. Los Angeles had been eliminated from the playoff race a week earlier.  James told The Athletic he does not plan to join Team USA for the FIBA Basketball World Cup, which will be played in China from Aug. 31-Sept. 15, despite his fondness for new U.S. coach Gregg Popovich. That had been James’ plan all along, as he is set to spend a good portion of his summer filming “Space Jam 2” with production set to begin in mid-June. The Athletic reported that a regulation basketball court will be built on-set to allow James to continue to train during filming.  Related News “Yeah, that’s a possibility,” LeBron told The Athletic. “It depends on how I feel. I love the Olympics.”James sat out the Rio Games in 2016 but had participated in the previous three Olympics, helping the U.S. to gold medals in 2012 and 2008 and a bronze in 2004. Lakers had to convince LeBron James playing this season wasn’t ‘worth it anymore’last_img read more

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POET expansion means big demand boost for Ohio corn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Agriculture has long been a victim of its own success. When doubts have arisen in the past about whether farmers could produce enough, they have every time been swept away in a sea of over production.Because of its astounding bounty, agriculture has been able to move beyond providing food to meet other needs of society, including energy.“Farmers are seeing we have far too much commodity on earth. This is the same thing that happened in the 1980s when biofuels were born. The way we solved that problem was to build ethanol plants and use up that extra supply. Today commodities are again oversupplied and we need the support of rural America because there are competing interests in the energy market that do not want to see us grow. We are constantly battling and we need to work together for higher ethanol blends in our gas tanks that are great for the environment and also great for Ohio’s farmers,” said Jeff Broin, CEO of POET, at the recent groundbreaking ceremony for the company’s Marion ethanol plant expansion. “In recent years, I know farmers are struggling with low commodity prices, which is creating lower farm incomes and decreasing land values. Biofuels have been the only real growth sector for ag commodities in the past decade.”POET has 27 ethanol plants and selected the central Ohio site to double production.“Ohio is a great place to do business. We love your business climate and your corn supply is great. Working with your state and local governments has always gone exceptionally well. Infrastructure, rail lines, natural gas availability, and electricity availability are all things that go into deciding where a plant will be,” Broin said. “In all of our 27 plants this one was No. 1 to expand next.”Ohio is an important location for serving domestic ethanol markets on the East Coast and also for serving potential export markets in the future.“We are working really hard on export markets. We are now exporting ethanol and DDGs,” Broin said. “Corn export markets have not changed in 35 years, but we are now exporting a billion gallons of ethanol going out of the country in the form of energy and adding jobs right here. We are creating new manufacturing jobs to export energy around the world.”POET Biorefining – Marion will expand its production capacity from the current 70 million gallons per year to 150 million gallons per year. The project will also increase production of dried distillers grains from the current 178,000 tons annually to 360,000 tons.“This expansion will add 26 million bushels of new corn demand annually for the local area and create new jobs and economic activity for rural Ohio,” Broin said. “We are excited that the Marion plant expansion can play a small role in this important arena.” This expansion is the largest project in the Marion area since the construction of the original POET Biorefining – Marion in 2008. With the groundbreaking in August, site work has officially begun, with project completion slated for the third quarter of 2018.The $120 million project will provide 225 temporary construction jobs and 18 to 21 new permanent jobs at the site, said Rick Fox, general manager of the Marion POET facility.“We chose here because the community and the farmers in the area are very supportive of what we want to do. We’re going to essentially double our volume here at this facility and double our purchases of corn and double the ethanol we produce. We’ll hire about 20 people and that is a significant impact for the surrounding community,” Fox said.  “When these plants were built the expansion was anticipated. A lot of the infrastructure is already existing and we are basically putting an identical plant right next to our existing plant.”In addition to the direct economic impact of the new plant, the increase in corn demand will have a broad benefit for corn producers.“This is a 26 million bushel corn market opening up. We get excited about 5 or 6 million bushel corn markets that are new for Ohio. This will take Ohio over a half billion gallons of ethanol produced a year,” said Tadd Nicholson with Ohio Corn and Wheat. “We’ve been working on ethanol for 25 years. It was one of the first things the first boards worked on with the new corn checkoff. They knew we could make ethanol more efficient and they started to invest in research.”With this continued big investment, Nicholson said there are several key policy concerns moving forward to further build upon Ohio’s existing ethanol infrastructure.“There is one really obscure thing — the Reid vapor pressure. It is one of the reasons we can’t sell E15 here in Ohio all year long. It is an obscure regulation that allows for a waiver for E10, but nothing above E10. There is a summer period where we have to shut down the sale of E15 but you can sell it during the winter months,” Nicholson said. “This waiver was put into place before we even had E15 as a certified fuel. It is unnecessary and unscientific and does nothing for the environment, but it does block the sale of E15. We’ve been working hard to get a waiver for this, but it is difficult to get anything small that makes good sense done in Washington, D.C. We know that 15% ethanol and higher blends only get better for the environment and it makes no sense why we have a block on E15.”The other key for ethanol is continued support from the initial levels specified in the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS).“In the RFS there are various tiers for the mandates each year. The first generation ethanol mandate is 15 billion gallons and we’ve reached that. The EPA stood behind that. There are some areas we could do better at, especially in the biodiesel area, but overall we are pleased with ethanol being at the statutory levels,” Nicholson said. “It is important to understand why the ethanol industry in Ohio would be expanding at all. In this country we have hit our maximum and we don’t need a whole lot more production for domestic use. It is about exporting ethanol — that is the big new frontier. Mexico is a great example. It is the first big market. Today they don’t use any but they are now able to go up to 10% in their fuel. It is a market that if fully realized, it would require almost Ohio’s annual production of corn. Even if it’s only half realized, it is a big market.”With the potential in Mexico and other countries looking to expand renewable energy, trade agreements are very important, particularly the North American Free Trade Agreement currently being re-negotiated, said John Linder, a Morrow County farmer and National Corn Growers Association board member.“You don’t necessarily have to deliver right here to POET to get to appreciate the value of this expansion. Basis everywhere in the area is going to have to increase,” Linder said. “The future of ethanol exports is bright. We didn’t realize that Canada would be our No. 1 export for ethanol. That is absolutely wonderful for our markets. We have to realize that 31% of ag income comes from exports. Any place we can build relationships to keep what we have and build new markets for corn is important to us.”In the end, the POET expansion will benefit the Marion community, the local corn price, and the state of Ohio, said David Daniels, director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture.“POET’s expansion will create even more market opportunities for Ohio’s producers and help the state’s number one industry, food and agriculture, continue to grow. Agribusinesses recognize Ohio’s growth environment and ultimately all Ohioans — consumers and farmers— benefit from this growth,” Daniels said. “We are so happy that POET has made the investment and chosen to expand in Marion, Ohio. We want to congratulate the POET team. We know you had plenty of places where you could invest your capital and we appreciate you choosing Ohio.”Anthony Bush, Morrow County farmer and National Corn Growers Association board member, Keith Truckor, Fulton County farmer and chair of the Ohio Corn Checkoff Board, Jeff Broin, CEO of POET, John Linder, Morrow County farmer and National Corn Growers Association board member, and Kelly Harsh, Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association board member, attended the groundbreaking ceremony for the POET expansion in Marion.last_img read more

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Deadline extended: Enroll by June 22 for new dairy program

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentUPDATE: USDA has extended the deadline for dairy producers to sign up for the Farm Service Agency’s Margin Protection Program – Dairy (MPP) through Friday, June 22. All dairy operations must make new coverage elections for 2018, even if the operation was enrolled during the previous 2018 signup period that ended in December 2017. Coverage elections made for 2018 will be retroactive to Jan. 1, 2018.PREVIOUSLY: Dairy farmers are being encouraged to enroll in the new and improved Margin Protection Program for Dairy now through June 1. MPP-Dairy changes authorized under the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 will provide better protections for producers from shifting milk and feed prices, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.It also is retroactive to cover all of 2018.Key changes to the new MPP-Dairy program include:Improving the ability for dairy farmers to use the Livestock Gross Margin (LGM-Dairy) program and other insurance options offered through USDAAdjusting the first tier of covered production to include each farm’s first 5 million pounds of annual milk production (about 217 cows) instead of 4 million poundsRaising the catastrophic coverage level from $4 to $5 for the first tier of covered production for all dairy farmersReducing the premium rates for the first 5 million pounds of production for more affordable coverageChanging the margin calculation from a bi-monthly to a monthly basisWaiving the annual $100 administrative fee for under-served farmers“We encourage dairy producers to review the provisions of the updated program, which Congress shaped with their feedback,” said USDA Sec. Sonny Perdue.John Newton, American Farm Bureau market intelligence director, said that the new MPP is a better safety net for dairy farmers than the previous one, largely because the catastrophic coverage level has increased from 4 to 5 million pounds and the program triggers monthly, instead of every two months.“Combined, it makes the program much more affordable and timelier in terms of delivering program payments to dairy farmers,” he said.Determining coverage levelsUSDA has a web tool to help producers determine the level of coverage under the MPP-Dairy that will provide them with the strongest safety net under a variety of conditions. The online resource allows dairy farmers to quickly and easily combine unique operation data and other key variables to calculate their coverage needs based on price projections. Producers can also review historical data or estimate future coverage based on data projections. The secure site can be accessed via computer, smartphone, tablet or any other platform.  Leave a Commentlast_img read more

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Learn the Real (Hard) Work of Residential Design

first_imgReflections on BuildingEnergy 2015NESEA Conference HighlightsOld Hippies Conspire to Save the WorldPearls of Wisdom From Recent ConferencesVideo: BuildingEnergy 2014: Stump the Energy NerdFrom Designed to Built: Delivering Your Green HomeIntegrated Design Reassessing Passive Solar Design PrinciplesSix Myths of Sustainable Design The other wanted a model home, a showcase of the possible, but with “turnkey” design that didn’t consume too much client time. One would be certified with PHIUS, using the newly minted WUFI Passive software, while the other pursued PHI certification with PHPP. But at their root, these projects shared a target, shared a climate, shared an architect. Chris will walk us through the process of each, and explain the whys of residential passive design in southern Maine.When architect Jesse Selman (C&H Architects in Amherst, Massachusetts) and builder Kent Hicks (Kent Hicks Construction in Chesterfield, Massachusetts) began a project together in Savoy, Massachusetts, it was simple enough: a deep energy retrofit of an existing home. The clients were committed to the property, owned a functioning house, and had decided to bring it up to modern standards for energy efficiency.What followed was anything but simple. It became a process spanning years, in which this team explored every branch of the residential decision tree. Would they keep the original house, or knock it down? Maybe they’d build on the same foundation, or use the old stone square as a garden plot? They explored factory-built and stick-framed new construction. With energy consultant Mike Duclos, of DEAP Energy Group, they pursued Passivhaus until the compromises in the view became too great, and they tested every material against the client’s extremely sensitive nose, which would not tolerate a chemical-laden environment. With a good-hearted client (the process can be unbearable without this saving grace), they pursued this ornate process to its elegantly simple end. High performance home designBuilder Mark Doughty (Thoughtforms) has made a living creating custom homes for others in the Greater Boston area, and when it came to creating a home for himself, he sought out engineer Jordan Goldman (Zero Energy Design). Together, they worked to design a high-performance home that, more than a year after completion, is producing more energy than it consumes. But what happened when Mark went back to business, creating homes to satisfy other people’s dreams?Architect Hank Keating (Trinity Development) works for a development company which focuses on urban neighborhoods, but he is not afraid of a challenge. He’d seen Passivhaus Consultant Mike Duclos (Deap Energy Group) present on Passivhaus, and brought him on when he started a Passive project of his own. The scope was large: one primary residence, one guest residence, an apartment for the interns, and a working farm. It’s not clear that he knew exactly what they were in for together, but Hank was undaunted by the process. With Mike as his guide through the thorns of PHPP, he had to come to grips with the consequences of design choices like large amounts of north-facing glass. They’ll talk together about the challenges and the compromises of an architect’s first foray into Passivhaus, and what they learned from the process. Residential retrofit in tricky situationsArchitect David Foley (Holland and Foley Architecture) and builder Paul Eldrenkamp (Byggmeister Design Build) ought to know better. Residential deep energy retrofit — bringing a home’s heating energy consumption down by 70% or more — are hard enough in normal circumstances. Doing renovations in historic districts are also notoriously fraught with perils, both financial and regulatory. Who in their right minds would combine the two?No one, including this team, who had been assured by code enforcement previously that the building was just outside the historic district. By the time the permitting process revealed that they’d be required to use all wood windows to comply with historic requirements, the project was already too developed to give up on. David and Paul will discuss the challenges, technical and otherwise, which faced this renovation of a 1928 Boston area home. The most expensive part of this project for David Foley himself? That it pushed him further along the road to net zero in his own thinking — and engendered a new round of renovations at his own home.His firm has been doing deep energy retrofits for years now, but when the tables turn, and it’s time for his own house renovation, architect Tom Hartman (C&H Architects) has to sell the idea to his wife and family, who would really rather plan a long family vacation. On a building he’s been working on and monitoring for more than a decade, Tom pushes through the (nearly) last round of retrofits at his 1911 Sears kit home: new siding and insulation to the outside, and a new heat pump for heating. He’ll walk through the calculations that got him there, the window details that saved his interior trim, the financial justifications, which finally earned him the green light, and the compromises we all make when it’s our own money on the line.I come to NESEA every year to hear stories like these — real people doing real, hard work, and coming back with real battle scars to tell the rest of us the results. I’m looking forward this winter to sitting back and listening to somebody else’s horror stories, and enjoying somebody else’s hard-earned successes. I hope you’ll join us this March 9 and 10, 2016 at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston for BuildingEnergy 16. RELATED ARTICLES center_img “When You Come To A Fork in the Road… Take It”Architect Chris Briley (a partner at Briburn in Portland, Maine) will share the stories of two projects, in parallel, with two clients, two sets of challenges, and two completed Passive Houses. One client didn’t want it to “look like a Passivhaus” and had a pretty strong idea of what it was like before the process even started — the kind of client who “just needs a little help with the floor plans.” I don’t sit in a hotel room in Boston for two days in the middle of winter, just to have someone tell me how everything worked out just as they planned. The truth is much more entertaining, a lot more flawed, and a lot more useful to me as a professional.Residential design is difficult work. With few exceptions, every client is an amateur. Every design is a testament to who the client thinks she ought to be. Every project is a wrestling match between the things he always wanted and the ones he can afford. The work is not easy.This year at the BuildingEnergy Boston conference in March, a collection of sessions will focus on the difficult parts of residential design, where no one will pretend it always goes perfectly. Let me tell you about them. Andrew Webster is a Certified Passive House Consultant at C&H Architects. This post originally appeared at the website of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association.last_img read more

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Westbrook’s 3-pointer at buzzer lifts Thunder past Kings

first_imgGoogle honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Read Next Westbrook, who notched his 18th triple-double of the season, made three free throws sandwiched around a bucket in the paint by Steven Adams to put Oklahoma City up 107-105.Justin Jackson’s 6-foot jumper off an offensive rebound tied the game. After a timeout, the Thunder got the ball in front of Sacramento’s bench and Carmelo Anthony found Westbrook atop the 3-point line for the winner.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutWestbrook lifted the Thunder from what would have been a devastating loss after a fast start in their first game since the All-Star break. They set a season high with 44 points in the first quarter and made 12 3-pointers but still had to rally in the final minutes to win.Anthony matched his season high of seven 3-pointers and Paul George had three from beyond the arc, ending his five-game streak with five or more 3s. It was the second-longest streak in NBA history behind George McCloud’s six-game streak in 1996. Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook reacts after hitting a 3-point shot at the buzzer against the Sacramento Kings in an NBA basketball game in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018. The Thunder won 110-107. (AP Photo/Steve Yeater)SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Russell Westbrook made a 3-pointer as time expired, lifting the Oklahoma City Thunder to a 110-107 victory over the Sacramento Kings on Thursday night.The Thunder blew a 23-point lead and trailed 105-102 with 4 ½ minutes remaining before closing the game on an 8-2 run.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. AFP official booed out of forum Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Ricky Vargas beats Peping Cojuangco for POC presidency Thunder: After scoring 44 points in the first quarter, the Thunder totaled just 41 over the next two periods.UP NEXTThunder: At Golden State on Saturday.Kings: Host the Lakers on Saturday. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding The Thunder shot nearly 70 percent in the first quarter and made seven 3s, including three straight by Anthony. George had two of them and added a three-point play and two free throws to put Oklahoma City up 44-21.It was the complete opposite for Billy Donovan’s club after that.Sacramento went on a pair of big runs early in the second quarter and got within 64-60 before Anthony’s fifth 3 of the first half briefly halted the onslaught and put Oklahoma City up by seven at halftime.The Thunder led 85-74 midway through the third before the Kings made another surge. Vince Carter, the 41-year-old former dunk champion, had a three-point play and 3-pointer and Sacramento scored the final 16 points of the period to go up 90-85.TIP-INSKings: Frank Mason scored six points in his first game since Dec. 31. Mason had been sidelined with a partially torn right facscia. . De’Aaron Fox (conjunctiveitis) and Kosta Koufos (ill) were held out.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READlast_img read more

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Unbeaten Meralco tackles Ceres

first_imgMeralco prevailed over JPV Marikina, 2-1, last week on the strength of James Younghusband’s second half header. But the Sparks expect a tougher test this time against a Ceres side boasting of quality players.“They have players with good reputations and deservedly so,” said Sparks striker Phil Younghusband. “Any one of their players can produce a moment of magic.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsThe Busmen are teeming with attacking talent in Manny Ott, Stephan Schrock, Iain Ramsay and Bienve Marañon.Patrick Reichelt also returned from a 10-month injury layoff last week and scored twice against Ilocos.“The players know they can play with Ceres but it will all boil down to hard work, concentration, and working together,” said Sparks coach Aris Caslib. Over at Cebu City Sports Center, Global Cebu tries to sustain its scintillating form at home when it hosts winless Davao Aguilas in the late kickoff at 7 p.m.The Cebuanos are unbeaten at CCSC, bringing down Ceres, 1-0, last July 5, before subduing Stallion Laguna, 3-0, on Sunday.With 20 points from nine matches, Global could find itself level on points with Meralco with a victory and a loss by the Sparks to Ceres.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Macau tourney for victorious Petron FC Meralco Manila puts its clean record on the line against a formidable Ceres Negros side on Saturday in the Philippines Football League at Rizal Memorial Stadium.The Sparks hope to go six points clear at the top with a victory in the 4 p.m. duel with the Busmen, who are coming off their most lopsided win of the season, after beating Ilocos United, 7-0, last Saturday in Bacolod.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’center_img Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Gameslast_img read more

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Rep Webber encourages local residents to fish for free on Feb 13

first_img01Feb Rep. Webber encourages local residents to fish for free on Feb. 13 and 14 Categories: News,Webber News State Rep. Michael Webber encourages anglers to get out to the nearest lake to participate in Free Fishing Weekend, which will take place on Feb. 13 and 14.Free Fishing Weekend is an event hosted twice each year by Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources – once in February, and again in June. On Feb. 13 and 14, fishermen and women are not required to carry a license while fishing. As most Michigan lakes are frozen solid in February, the winter weekend event is traditionally used for ice fishing.“Even though it’s cold outside, ice fishing is a great way to enjoy Michigan’s great outdoors,” said Rep. Webber, R-Rochester Hills. “The DNR’s Free Fishing Weekend is a great opportunity to get out there with friends, family and young ones.”Because Michigan temperatures were generally mild until mid-January, Rep. Webber encourages anglers to take extra safety precautions when venturing out onto the ice to drop a line.A full listing of current and upcoming Free Fishing Weekend activities can be found online at www.michigan.gov/freefishing.###last_img read more

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