Long Island Chef to Compete on Cutthroat Kitchen

first_imgDJ Chef of Long Beach is competing on Cutthroat Kitchen, a new Food Network show.DJ Chef, the Long Island party host who cooks up treats while simultaneously spinning records, is going to testing his skills as a contestant on the new Food Network show Cutthroat Kitchen.Also known as Marc Weiss, this Long Beach native got his start in music when he received a turntable for Christmas when he was 16. He worked at local clubs and then worked as a prep cook at an Italian caterer to earn extra money—eventually merging the two interests into a successful entertainment/catering service.“I was always coming in late because I was deejaying the night before,” Weiss said of his start in that catering company.The owner said he was talented, should stop deejaying and go to culinary school. Eventually, he listened to her and went to The New York Restaurant School.  After graduating, Weiss worked at elite restaurants before throwing his own dinner parties. He added music to the dinner parties and became DJ Chef.He has been on TV shows before, including Food Network’s What’s Hot, What’s Cool and MTV’s Spring Break.On Cutthroat Kitchen, hosted by Food Network star Alton Brown, each contestant receives $25,000 to “buy” ingredients to use to make dishes. They can bid on ingredients or hinder other chefs by forbidding them to taste their dish beforehand or taking away a vital ingredient, like salt. The winner will take home the money that is left over after the bidding.“Cutthroat Kitchen is a cooking competition like viewers have never seen before,” said Bob Tuschman, general manager and senior vice president of Food Network. “Culinary skills can get chefs into the kitchen, but they will have to play a game of wits to stay there.”Weiss could not say too much about his episode, but he said that “it was like crazy” and that with so many restrictions, the clear favorite may not always be the winner.Cutthroat Kitchen premieres at 10 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 11. The episode that Weiss appears in will air Aug. 18. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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BLOG: What Self-Driving Cars Could Do For Pennsylvania

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter By: Leslie S. Richards, Secretary of Transportation Infrastructure,  The Blog,  Transportation For years we’ve heard about and imagined transportation technology that would improve safety, help the environment and increase travel efficiency. This technology is arriving faster than many of us could have imagined, and this week I joined state and private-sector representatives to announce our steps to put Pennsylvania at the forefront of their safe, innovative development.Autonomous and connected vehicle technologies, which encompass everything from self-driving cars to infrastructure and vehicles talking to each other, hold huge potential. And their testing and development is already occurring in Pennsylvania, which is why we marked the state’s latest steps at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, where they already developed their own autonomous vehicle.First, we held the first meeting of a newly established Autonomous Vehicles Testing Policy Task Force that will collaboratively develop guidance that PennDOT will use when drafting autonomous vehicle policy. PennDOT is chairing the task force, which is comprised of state, federal and private-industry officials such as the Federal Highway Administration, AAA, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Uber Technologies. Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf June 01, 2016 BLOG: What Self-Driving Cars Could Do For Pennsylvania Additionally, state lawmakers joined me to explain legislation they’re sponsoring in the state Senate and House to establish Pennsylvania as a national leader in autonomous vehicle testing.The legislation would:Provide for controlled automated vehicle testing, not operation;Allow flexibility to adapt to changing technology;Require companies interested in testing to submit an application and provide proof of $5 million in general liability insurance; andAllow support for in-vehicle and remote-operator testing, considered the “Full Self-Driving Automation” level, the fourth and highest level of automation as defined by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.These developments mean exciting progress for Pennsylvania. Various studies and research have pointed to autonomous and connected vehicles as having environmental and travel benefits in addition to reducing human error in driving. Vehicle functions such as maintaining more consistent speeds, communicating with infrastructure or other vehicles, and allowing highway officials to eventually to invest less in engineering solutions related to human behavior (such as rumble strips) are examples of potential benefits of expanding these technologies.At the state level, these steps could quickly bring additional economic opportunities as automotive and technology companies, encouraged by the legislation, could establish themselves in the state.While our daily mission of maintaining a safe transportation system continues, we are also looking to bring the future here, using the state’s rich history of innovation to establish us as a national leader in these technologies.last_img read more

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