For Pasadena’s Youngest Boxers, Months of Training on the Line at Saturday’s Villa-Parke Boxing Show

first_img Top of the News More Cool Stuff “I love the sport and I love winning. You have to set goals and have motivation,” said 17-year-old amateur boxer Humberto Robles of Pasadena.Pasadena’s youth amateur boxers will step into the ring and showcase their skills in the bi-annual Villa-Parke Boxing Show this Saturday, putting months of dedication and training on the line for the city to see.Kids from all over the state are making appearances to match up with boxers from Pasadena starting as young as eight. The long standing-boxing program facilitated through the city of Pasadena Human Services & Recreation Department is fully responsible for churning out these young boxers every year.“It’s an opportunity for Pasadena to showcase our kids alongside kids from all over Southern California,” said Fausto De LaTorre, Villa-Parke Community Center’s boxing specialist.Sacrifice and dedication is the name of the game for these young boxers. These Pasadena kids start from nothing and dedicate themselves to eight months of training, six days a week — all building up to get in the ring for their first match.“You start them from ground zero. You have to build them up to build their confidence and with that you give them the Olympic-style boxing skill,” said De LaTorre.De LaTorre will host 20 bouts on Saturday, in which he is hopeful that about ten of his kids will be matched up with opponents and showcased in the ring. This moment alone is what months of preparation has led up to for these kids.“I strive to help these kids feel confident, have self esteem and believe in themselves because this is a sport that you can’t play. It’s not a team sport,” said De LaTorre.De LaTorre, who has been boxing competitively since age nine and is a twenty year veteran within the city boxing program, emphasizes the importance of working one-on-one with every student who comes through the gym, which has an average attendance of fifty to sixty boxers every day.“I want each and every one of them to know that I’m here to help shape them into the boxers they not only want to be, but can be,” explained De LaTorre.For the young boxers, staying focused and loving the challenge fuels their anticipation for their big match.“I love the sport and I love winning. You have to set goals and have motivation,” said 17-year-old amateur boxer Humberto Robles of Pasadena.De LaTorre will also host a Master’s bout this weekend consisting of fighters age forty and older. This match allows boxers who cannot compete and move up the ranks under the USA Boxing guidelines get in the ring and match up with opponents. This is an exciting opportunity for De LaTorre; he says it’s important for the older boxers to continue to strive and to emphasize keeping a healthy lifestyle.The Villa-Parke Boxing Show has become a symbol for much more than entertainment and showcasing in the past years. It has made itself a medium within the city known for bringing the community together and teaching life skills that are sure to stick.“At the end of the day, you’re going to walk out of here with good health, knowing how to defend yourself and most importantly of all, you’ve learned a discipline and character that you can apply in everyday life,” said De LaTorre.The Villa-Parke Boxing Show is a great exhibition of the sport and to see up and coming area contenders. The show will kicks off this Saturday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Villa Parke Recreation Center located at 363 E. Villa Street.There is a $10 suggested donation and children under 12 are free.For more information call (626) 744-6530 or visit ci.pasadena.ca.us/HumanServices. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy HerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? 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Cuomo signs bill barring evictions of some small businesses

first_imgGov. Andrew Cuomo (Cuomo by David Dee Delgado/Getty Images; iStock)More than a month after the legislature approved it, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed a measure that expands commercial eviction and foreclosure protections for some small businesses until May.The measure, which was passed by the Senate and Assembly in late January, allows businesses with 50 or fewer employees to avoid evictions through at least May 1 by filing a financial hardship declaration. Owners of 10 or fewer commercial units can also fill out a hardship declaration to stave off foreclosure until then.In a press release, the governor announced an agreement with the legislature to amend the bill. Those changes would apply eviction protections to businesses with 100 or fewer employees, and to those with 500 or fewer employees that were closed to in-person operations by executive order or a Department of Health directive for two or more weeks between May 15, 2020, and May 1, 2021.ADVERTISEMENTThe legislature will need to separately pass these chapter amendments.Sen. Anna Kaplan, one of the bill’s sponsors, said in a statement that the measure will give struggling businesses “a shot at survival” and “the opportunity to get back on their feet without the looming threat of being closed down for good.”The measure follows confusion over the status of the state’s commercial eviction ban. The governor’s most recent executive order on the matter expired Feb. 22. That day, the governor signed a blanket order that seemed to extend the moratorium to March 24.If that were the case, the ban could have been effective for yet another 30 days: When the legislature curbed the governor’s emergency powers last week, it approved extending existing directives for that period of time. A spokesperson for the governor, however, disputed that.The new law closely mirrors the state’s restrictions on residential evictions, which the legislature approved in December to landlords’ dismay. That bill froze most evictions and foreclosures for two months, and extended protections through May 1 for residential tenants who file hardship declarations.There are some differences, however. Attorney Adam Leitman Bailey pointed to language in the bill that bars removal of a commercial tenant by any means “except by an eviction proceeding” prior to May 1.He said this clause is targeted at so-called “self-help” evictions, in which a landlord effectively kicks a commercial tenant out by changing the locks. He said the eviction ban is “extremely unfortunate for our economy and for many small businesses that need tenants’ rent to stay in business.”One highlight of the bill, according to Bailey, is that it only halts commercial eviction cases started prior to March 7 for 60 days.Contact Kathryn Brenzel Full Name* Message* Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Email Address* Tags Andrew CuomoCommercial Real EstateEviction moratoriumPoliticslast_img read more

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