Donley and Kraemer Earn PFL Weekly Honors

first_imgDonley was named PFL Special Teams Player of the Week for the second time this season. He hit a career-best 48-yard field goal and scored nine points in Drake’s 52-7 PFL victory against Jacksonville, Saturday. He also booted a successful on-side kick late in the second quarter that was recovered by Drake and set up a quick strike score by Kraemer. Donley’s 48-yard field goal was the second longest in the PFL this season and put Drake ahead 45-7 in the third quarter. He also converted all six of his PAT kicks. Kraemer was named PFL Offensive Player of the Week as he threw four touchdown passes, while just playing three quarters. He completed 15-of-18 passes for 268 yards. His first two touchdown tosses each went to Steven Doran from 49 and 55 yards out. Kraemer then connected with Connor Ostrander for touchdown on consecutive plays. He hit Ostrander from 13 yards out with 1:52 left in the first half then, after Drake recovered an on-side kick, Kraemer hit Ostrander again from 28-yards out eight seconds later to push the Drake lead to 35-7. Both Ostrander (6 receptions, 102 yards) and Doran (2 receptions 104 yards) posted 100-yard receiving outings. Print Friendly Version ST. LOUIS, Mo. – Drake University football’s Danny Donley and Grant Kraemer garnered Pioneer Football League weekly honors on Sunday, Nov. 19last_img read more

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Utility Will Test the Effectiveness of Smart Meters

first_imgWi-fi connected smart meters let utilities track how much electricity customers are using in real time, triggering warnings to cut back when demands on the grid are too high. Now, a Chicago utility has agreed to study whether the meters are effective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.In a deal involving the Environmental Defense Fund, Commonwealth Edison, and the Illinois Citizens Utility Board, ComEd has agreed to test whether customers who have smart members use less electricity than customers who don’t have them. In a post at Midwest Energy News, E&E Publishing reports that ComEd will compare how electricity use differs hour by hour between customers with and without smart meters. If smart meter programs successfully prompt customers to shift their use of electricity to non-peak hours of the day, there would be less of a need to bring on power plants to meet peak demands and, consequently, fewer greenhouse gas emissions.“The ability to calculate the environmental benefits of clean energy investments like smart meters is critical to accelerating the new energy economy,” the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) said.The test is the result of a law passed by the Illinois state legislature in 2011 permitting ComEd and Ameren Corporation to get higher utility rates if they invested in advanced meters and met other conditions, E&E said. EDF and the Citizens Utility Board then petitioned the state’s Commerce Commission to require the utilities to measure greenhouse gas emissions as part of the deal. Peak time warningsComEd reports that it has installed nearly 2 million smart meters in its service area and plans to bring the total to 4 million by 2018.The utility offers smart meter customers a number of tools to monitor their use of electricity, ComEd spokeswoman Krissy Posey told GBA. Among them is the Peak Time Savings program in which customers are alerted by e-mail or text a day or two in advance of expected high loads during the summer. The warnings give customers a chance to dial back their use of electricity at a time when demand pushes costs higher. More than 110,000 customers are currently enrolled, and Posey said that collectively they saved nearly $400,000 last summer.Customers also can log onto their ComEd accounts and enroll in a program that alerts them when their use of electricity is greater than normal, get personalized tips on saving energy, and set savings goals, Posey said. ComEd also offers an hourly pricing program giving customers the option of using power when prices are at their lowest.The E&E report said that the groups spent several years trying to agree on how greenhouse gas emissions would be measured, but didn’t come to an understanding that all sides liked. Posey said that the Illinois Commerce Commission has yet to issue a final order on the monitoring program and that details of how it would work are still being ironed out.last_img read more

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‘Live Long and Prosper’? Tech Can Ensure We Do

first_imgRelated Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Brad AndersonEditor In Chief at ReadWrite Trends Driving the Loyalty Marketing Industry If you want to break into the tech industry, a good area of focus is finding ways to help humans live longer. Some of the most auspicious areas of technology today include healthcare advancements such as the IoT and wearable tech, and for good reason.Not more than 150 years ago, the average human lifespan was just about 40 years. Modern medicine has managed to double our average lifespan over the past 150 years by solving simple health problems and expanding treatment options. Who’s to say we couldn’t double it again in another 150 years by adding technology to the equation?That’s the question that many of today’s technology companies are working to answer. Wearable tech, artificial intelligence, robotics, and big data are all lending their assistance to the goal of cheating death.Many of the major players in today’s tech industry are on the ball, devoting millions of dollars toward life-extending initiatives. Google co-founder Sergey Brin has donated $50 million to Parkinson’s research, while Google’s umbrella company Alphabet has put more than $730 million toward Calico, a company singularly focused on lengthening the human lifespan. Jeff Bezos and Peter Thiel have entered the life extension game as well, funding Unity Biotechnology, a company designing drugs and treatments to keep aging individuals disease-free as long as possible.Health Maintenance Through TelemedicineToday, it’s easier than ever to manage our health. “The theme of healthcare is going to be changed completely through simple things like connecting data from heart monitors, blood pressure monitors, glucose meters, and even by understanding how someone’s moving around their house,” says Geoff Gross, founder and CEO of Medical Guardian. He believes connected care — that is, connected devices and the data they provide — will continue to transform healthcare for the better.Virtual doctor visits and advances in wearable sensors all help us prioritize our well-being. The modern healthcare landscape makes connecting with our healthcare providers as easy as picking up a smartphone, tapping a wristwatch, or enabling a webcam.Preventive care is the name of the game, and it’s where today’s tech really shines. We no longer have to wait until our yearly physical or rely on our own self-assessment to gauge the state of our bodies. Wearable tech and an aggregation of data from the population at large can begin to do the work of raising red flags for us, helping keep our bodies on a long-term path to wellness.Harnessing Robotics and 3D PrintingWhile technology is improving practices for sustaining our bodies, it’s also helping us rebuild them. 3D printing advances are already hitting the market, helping us reconstruct worn-out pieces of our physical frames. 3D-printed organs and tissues and robotic replacements for failing organs are quickly taking a leading role in longevity efforts.Robotics and 3D-printed human parts are likely to become commonplace therapies and may even help us enhance our human capabilities to become improved versions of ourselves. Robotics are being developed to perform surgeries, help patients relearn how to walk, and even transfer drugs and linens throughout hospitals.It’s no secret that organ donor lists fall short; supply cannot meet demand. 3D printing is working to close that gap, too. The goal is that cells will be printed exactly where they’re needed to better treat burn victims, and replacement parts from earlobes to functioning organs will be printed on demand.Treating the Mind, as Well as the BodyTo really tackle longevity, though, tech efforts to develop medical monitoring and treatment options must extend beyond physical symptoms to treat not just the body, but also the mind. This need is all the more urgent because the average U.S. life expectancy has actually been declining in recent years, due in large part to unexpected spikes in drug overdoses and suicides. The body is important, but if we want to live longer, we must also manage our mental health.Telepsychiatric services are at the forefront of mental health advancements, and they remain a promising potential tool for treating addiction and helping those at risk of suicide. The “2019 State of Mental Health” report by Mental Health America found that 56 percent of individuals with mental health problems are still not receiving treatment. Introducing telepsychiatry removes a common barrier to treatment — namely, access to care — making individuals much more likely to seek the help they need.While tech is making virtual mental health services available, the fact that health insurance providers aren’t always required to cover any of the cost presents an additional barrier for Americans. Thirty-two states have legislated that private insurance cover telemedicine in an effort to build a technological support system into standard medical care. Hopefully, this trend will continue to make the most of the tech available to us.Improving Health Through AgtechThe benefits that technology can lend to our life extension efforts don’t stop at healthcare. Technology can also improve food production and keep our populations well-fed and healthy.The quality and quantity of food available throughout the world today is an impressive feat of modern agriculture. As the average lifespan lengthens, however, our population will undoubtedly grow. This means we must learn how to develop more nutritious, bountiful, and longer-keeping food on less land.Smart farming is now possible with the use of new technological solutions such as drones, AI, and other monitoring systems that can help manage crops and livestock and collect data that can be used to improve future farming practices. Companies are cropping up everywhere (no pun intended) with new technologies to improve efficiency and productivity in agriculture. For example, Harvest CROO automates strawberry harvesting, GreenIQ automates sprinkler systems, and Plantix evaluates soil conditions.Until recently, hunger and starvation had been on the decline. Sadly, the number of people facing food insecurity has risen around the world in recent years. The market for ag-optimizing tech is growing, and it’s poised to become not just a passion project, but a must-have if we hope to support a growing population.Some of our biggest tech moguls are tuning in to the life extension effort, and any tech company willing to tackle the challenge will have no shortage of peers to keep it company. A future where we no longer have to say early goodbyes to loved ones is more than a pipe dream. In today’s tech industry, another game-changing increase to the average lifespan could be no more than a few technological hurdles short of a promise. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Brad is the editor overseeing contributed content at ReadWrite.com. He previously worked as an editor at PayPal and Crunchbase. You can reach him at brad at readwrite.com. Follow the Puck Tags:#3d printing#Agtech#life extension#technology#telemedicine#telepsychiatry#wearables last_img read more

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