Out of the Seller’s Market, Into the Buyer’s Market

first_img  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Related Articles February marked a transition from a seller’s market to a buyer’s market, according to recent data from RE/MAX. According to the RE/MAX National Housing Report, declining sales and growing inventory have pushed the market forward for buyers.February’s 4.2 percent downturn was the smallest since August 2o18, as home sales have declined year-over-year for seven consecutive months. Meanwhile, inventory grew by 5.8 percent in February year over year, the fifth consecutive month of year over year growth. Month over month, February saw more homes sold than in January, up by 10.2 percent.“Trends of five months or more often indicate significant shifts, and the year-over-year trends in declining sales and rising inventory have both reached that length now,” said RE/MAX CEO Adam Contos. “It’s interesting to see the slowing sales and growing inventories that benefit buyers and at the same time the record prices that benefit sellers. The big picture supports an ongoing return to more balanced conditions.”Additionally, the report states that in February, the median sales price increased to $240,000, up 5.5 percent year over year, and a February record. The metro areas with the lowest days on market were Omaha, Nebraska at 34, San Francisco at 37, and a two-way tie between Denver and San Diego at 42. The highest days on market averages were in Augusta, Maine at 120, Trenton, New Jersey at 113, and Hartford, Connecticut at 96.“The next few months will determine whether the shift brings a wave of buyers into the market for the spring selling season. Members of our network are reporting high local demand along with a need for even more inventory. The optimism for a solid spring exists – and a more balanced market certainly contributes to it.”The average days on the market for homes sold in February was up four days month over month, up to 63, a one day year over year gain. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Tagged with: Buyers Home Prices Inventory RE/MAX sellers Share Save Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Buyers Home Prices Inventory RE/MAX sellers 2019-03-21 Seth Welborn About Author: Seth Welborn Home / Daily Dose / Out of the Seller’s Market, Into the Buyer’s Marketcenter_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News March 21, 2019 1,656 Views Out of the Seller’s Market, Into the Buyer’s Market Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Churchill Mortgage Teams With American Home Title Next: CFPB Tackles Mortgage Debt Collection Issues The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

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10 Last Minute Father’s Day Gift Ideas for the Outdoorsy Dad

first_imgIn case you somehow missed it, Father’s Day is Sunday. If you’re like me, and you haven’t made plans or arrangements for that outdoorsy dad on your list, don’t freak out just yet. There’s still time. And with this top 10 list of top-notch gifts for the outdoor-loving Dad in your life, the task just got a little simpler.1. Costa Polarized SunglassesNew in 2016, the Rafael frames offer optimum comfort, style, and durability while the copper shaded 580 p glass lenses are perfectly calibrated to the mountain trout streams of the Blue Ridge.costa2_FIX2. Ice Mule CoolerThis is a serious cooler designed for extreme adventure. It’s perfect for the dad on the go because it allows him to keep things cold without having to lug a heavy, bulky cooler around!Screen Shot 2015-06-15 at 2.07.18 PMScreen Shot 2015-06-15 at 2.07.24 PM 6. Deuter Kid Comfort 2“Designed for that feeling of boundless freedom on longer hikes, Kid Comfort has taken thousands of kids and parents on great excursions outdoors.” Related Content: 3. Altec Lansing Sport EarBudsThese waterproof buds stay securely in your ear even when you’re dripping with sweat or covered in mud. They can even go under water for lake swims or laps in the pool. With 20 hours of battery life, these Bluetooth buds are comfy and snug, and they deliver top-notch sound to power you through your next workout.Sport Headphones Redcenter_img Screen Shot 2015-06-15 at 1.53.20 PM7. Oboz SundogLet Dad  leave winter’s weight behind with the versatility of the Sundog – traction, breathability, comfort, and only-what-you-need protection.Screen Shot 2015-06-15 at 1.57.41 PM8. Leki Instructor Lite Hiking PolesLeki is the industry standard for hiking poles, and the Instructor Lites don’t disappoint. With rubber fitness tips, adjustable trigger straps, an innovative patented Shark Grip releasable strap system, and 100% carbon shafts, the poles are lightweight yet durable.  The poles are easily adjustable, too, allowing multiple users to size the poles to their needs.unnamed9. Chaco Updraft EcotreadThese are our approach shoes. In the fall and winter, we convert them into “Sacos” for bouldering. You don’t have to tie your shoes from boulder to boulder. It’s a pain in the ass to tie your shoes. $95chaco updraft_FIX10.  Columbia OutDry Extreme Rain JacketColumbia is positioning their new OutDry Extreme tech as a paradigm shift in the world of raingear, which has been dominated by Gore-Tex for the last 30 years or so. It’s the first two-layer system, employing a wicking fabric on the inside and a super-durable waterproof membrane on the outside.Men's OutDry EX Diamond Shell 4. myCharge All-TerrainIt’s the first waterproof, temperature proof, drop proof and dust proof portable battery pack. Charge your phone or devices on big backcountry adventures without worrying about the elements.The All-Terrain is waterproof up to two meters for one hour and can withstand extreme heat and cold without losing charging capabilities.AllTerrain open5. Howler Brothers, Matagorda Tech ShirtTechnical shirts are a dime a dozen these days, but Howler Brothers has outdone themselves with the Matagorda Tech Shirt, the newest in an apparel lineup that is being heralded by industry pros and weekend warriors alike. The key to the Matagorda’s functionality is its streamlined simplicity. The design is clean and focused and the breathable nylon fabric is engineered for extreme flexibility.LS Shirt_Matagorda_Crustaceanlast_img read more

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CDC: no plans now to send 1918 virus to other labs

first_img Oct 21 CIDRAP News story on classification of the 1918 virus as a select agenthttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/oct2105agent.html Nov 11, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has no current plans to release the reconstructed version of the virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic to other laboratories, the head of the CDC said yesterday, but she did not rule out the possibility. She said the virus currently exists nowhere else than the CDC, which is studying it in the hope of learning more about the biology of influenza and pandemics and helping to develop better vaccines and drugs. An unsigned editorial in Nature this week endorses research on the virus but says that sharing it with other labs would increase the risk of an accidental release. “The 1918 flu virus is hard to contain and is capable of spreading rapidly between people. The researchers who work with the reconstructed virus point out that current flu vaccines and drugs provide good protection from it—but these are in short supply, and the threat of an accidental release is real.” Some critics have said the 1918 virus should never have been recreated because it could cause another pandemic if it escaped, and that releasing it to other labs would compound the risk. At the end of a news conference on flu vaccine supply issues yesterday, CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding said, “There was an unfortunate report that appeared in a media outlet today that indicated that CDC was distributing its reconstructed 1918 virus to other parts of the country for scientific investigation. I just want to set the record straight on this. CDC has no plans currently to distribute the reconstructed virus anywhere. We’re working on it here in Atlanta. We have collaborations with investigators to come into our campus and work with the virus here.” Transcript of Nov 10 CDC teleconferencehttp://www.cdc.gov/media/transcripts/t051110.htm A report in Nature this week quoted CDC spokesman Von Roebuck as saying that labs that are registered to work with select agents—dangerous pathogens and toxins subject to special handling rules—could request the virus. No labs had made such a request yet, Roebuck told the magazine. The CDC classified the virus as a select agent Oct 20. The editorial suggests working toward an international agreement governing the distribution and handling of potentially dangerous reconstructed viruses. Governments should ask the World Health Organization to look into this possibility, the writer says. See also: The writer notes that other labs could reconstruct the virus themselves by using the published genomic sequence. That removes the risk associated with mailing the virus, but “still leaves the risk of an escape from labs that work with it.” The Nature report says that scientists at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg plan to work with the 1918 virus but will not request it from the CDC. Frank Plummer, the lab’s scientific director, said the lab would obtain constructs containing the virus’s DNA from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Using those pieces, the Winnipeg lab will be able to recreate the virus in a few days, Plummer told the magazine. “We have to balance that with our overarching moral and scientific imperatives to make sure that virus is handled with the absolute best possible biocontainment and biosafety procedures,” Gerberding said. “We know we can do that at CDC and we probably will be able to assure that other investigators can do likewise, but until such time as we recognize the scientific merit and the adequacy of the biosafety containment procedures, that virus is not going anywhere and it’s not leaving the CDC without my express approval.” CDC scientists reconstructed the virus after a group at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) succeeded in sequencing its genome. The AFIP group had recovered fragments of the virus from preserved tissue samples from victims of the 1918 pandemic, which made the sequencing possible. The pandemic killed up to 100 million people worldwide. Last month the CDC reported that the reassembled virus was highly lethal to mice and grew explosively in lab cultures of human lung cells. The agency handles the virus under enhanced biosafety level 3 conditions and has said that other labs with the same level of security can work with it. BSL-3 is the second highest of the four biosecurity classifications.last_img read more

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