Online security workshops in US Journalism Schools

first_img NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say June 3, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on United States News June 7, 2021 Find out more United StatesAmericas Reporters Without Borders is bringing its 10 years unique expertise on online security issues in the most prestigious American journalism institutions by organizing workshops at the National Press Club in Washington, DC on February 26, at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism on February 27, at New York University Journalism Institute on February 28 and at CUNY Graduate School of Journalism on March 1, 2013. These workshops are reserved for the schools students. Only the workshop at the National Press Club is open to the public.During the workshop, the journalists will learn to be aware of mobile phone tracability and communications interception possibilities, to be aware of metadata, to erase deleted data, to be aware of dangers on public wifi networks, to prepare their computer to travel in at risk countries and to encrypt data to protect information and sources. After the workshop, the journalists who attended will keep access to an arsenal of resources and softwares to use.Since a decade the press freedom organization works on internet freedom issues and have been organizing online security workshops for journalists and citizen-journalists in South East Asia and in the Middle East for many years.As the recent New York Times hacking reminds us raising awareness on online security issues among journalists is a priority. In order to preserve access to sensitive information and to protect their sources, reporters need to be aware of basic online security issues and easy-to-use tools to protect their work. This expertise is not just necessary for reporters’ safety, but also for ensuring the protection of sources, a cornerstone of a free press.Workshop teacherStephane Koch, Senior Online Security advisor for Reporters Without Borders since 2003, will lead this workshops series. Koch has taught in many schools in Europe (including the School of Economic War in Paris and the Journalism School in Lausanne, Switzerland). Koch also serves as a consultant on online social networking, media strategy and information security. In 2011, he organized a four day workshop in South East Asia with Reporters Without Borders on information security for local journalists in the region. He animated a workshop at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in March 2012. And he just animated a similar session for journalists in Egypt.Contact: Delphine Halgand – [email protected] News United StatesAmericas Newscenter_img RSF_en Organisation Receive email alerts Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists to go further Help by sharing this information April 28, 2021 Find out more February 25, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Online security workshops in US Journalism Schoolslast_img read more

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Loeb House garden: Colorful blooms of Elizabeth Gray

first_img 4The Loeb House gate frames the garden. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Elizabeth Gray, senior associate secretary to the University, has tended the Loeb House garden in Harvard Yard since 1985. “It began as a very small effort,” said Gray. “A row of potentilla was already in place alongside the holly hedge when I started adding annuals to extend the season of bloom. Then one perennial led to another.”Taking inspiration from a visit to Cambridge, England, Gray described her plantings as “exuberant cottage-style garden,” that are “a little quirky and not too neat, with a season of bloom that starts with early spring crocus and runs until late October — including a big crimson splash of peonies around Commencement.”As a walk-to-work Cambridge resident without a home garden of her own, Loeb House’s garden has been a constant learning opportunity for Gray and her colleagues who help maintain the space. “The site has its own challenges, from part sun to maple shade, each area supporting different plants. Harvard’s decision to compost allowed significant enrichment of the soil in recent years, and the flowers and shrubs have just taken off from there.”Gray also finds satisfaction in the regulars who check in throughout the season to see what’s in bloom and compare gardening successes and failures with tourists who discover them by chance.“People tell me they stop by on their way from work for a quick change of pace as they decompress from the day,” said Gray. “Many people find that spending time around flowers increases their own sense of balance and harmony. I know that is true for me.” 7A giant onion (Allium giganteum) — an ornamental perennial — flowers in the Loeb House garden. Jon Chase/ Harvard Staff Photographer 5White stargazer lilies add an elegant note. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Sunlight shines through the cherry and crab apple trees at Loeb House. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Yellow blooms are ruffled by the wind outside Loeb House, which is located across from Lamont Library. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer center_img 6An up-close view of a bloom. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 2Dewy peonies glisten outside Loeb House. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Elizabeth Gray works in the garden. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Elizabeth Gray prunes back some overgrowth in the Loeb House garden. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer last_img read more

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