CHMS Theater students present ‘The Three Little Pigs’

first_img Around the WebIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson CHMS Theater students present ‘The Three Little Pigs’ Sponsored Content Skip Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “The library collaborated with the middle school on the fall carnival that include the play, Halloween crafts and outside games,” said Teresa Colvin, TPL children’s librarian. “The kindergarten students were a great audience and everyone had a lot of fun.”Jenny Meadows, intro to theater teacher, said the script for “The Three Little Pigs” was the handiwork of Emily Grant’s creative writing class at CHMS.“The students did a fantastic job of creating a script which was adapted from Dr. David Dye’s Piped Pipers program at Troy University.” Email the author Print Article By The Penny Hoardercenter_img Book Nook to reopen Latest Stories You Might Like Students explore ‘Wild West’ in annual art contest The Johnson Center for the Arts hosted an awards ceremony Thursday for the student winners in the Center’s Wild, Wild… read more By Jaine Treadwell Published 3:00 am Saturday, October 29, 2016 If you have a great little play and you’d like a great little audience, then perform for a bunch of kindergarten kids.The Charles Henderson Middle School Intro to Theater class had a great little play and also a great little audience in the kindergarten classes from Troy Elementary School for their performance Friday. And, everyone had a great little time at the Troy Public Library’s Fall Carnival.More than 155 kindergarten students and their teachers and parents made up the audiences for three performances of  “The Three Little Pigs.” Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Dye, retired dean of the university’s theater department, organized a troupe of university students who performed for elementary students in and around Pike County.“The Pied Pipers shared stories with young children and I would like for the CHMS intro to theater class to have those same opportunities,” Meadows said. “It would be a good experience for the theater students and a great way to expose young students to theater.” The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies…last_img read more

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Plan for Backyard Fruit

first_imgIn the years to come, all this hard work will be worth it. Just keep thinking about how good allthat fruit from your backyard will taste. Fruit plants require a little more care in some areas than others. But with some planning andwork, you can enjoy tasty fruits from your own garden. Krewer said right after you order your stock, start preparing the soil for planting. Most small fruits get their best start if you plant them in December through February. Manynurseries take orders for plants in mid-September. Ordering early helps you make sure you’llget plants. Then break up the soil in the planting hole. Krewer said new fruit plants need a hole at least 2feet deep and 2 feet across. “Be sure to break up any clay or hard pans that could slow or stoproot growth,” he said. As plants emerge from dormancy in early spring, their leaves and shoots grow quickly. Winterplanting helps the plants establish a strong root system. That helps the young plants surviveduring those first few critical months. “Many procedures and varieties we develop for commercial production are well-suited forbackyard growers, too,” NeSmith said. Backyard gardeners benefit from commercial fruit research, too. You’re more likely to get the best plants, too, Krewer said. And you can be assured of gettingthe variety you want. Georgians grow all types of fruits in their yards, gardens and even in pots. Fruit experts withthe University of Georgia say blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and figs flourish in mostof the state.center_img There are truly dozens of varieties of every fruit. But not all will grow well in your area. Sochoose carefully, said Scott NeSmith, a CAES research horticulturist in Griffin. “For backyard fruits, the two most important things to do in early fall are ordering nurserystock and preparing the soil,” said Gerard Krewer, an extension horticulturist with the UGACollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Research has identified at least five or six really good variety choices for every area of thestate,” he said. NeSmith checks varieties for fruit size, abundance, harvest window and othergrowth characteristics. “There is more of an advantage to planting during early winter in south Georgia than in northGeorgia,” he said. “But there is still a definite advantage to planting in winter, instead of laterin the spring, all over the state.” Testing allows time for lime to increase the pH level, Krewer said. Mix lime with the soil inthe planting hole. Most fruit plants like slightly acid soils — those with a pH around 6.0 to 6.5. Blueberries arethe exception, he said. “They prefer very acid soils with a pH around 4 to 5.3, so don’t limesoil for blueberries.” Test your soil to find out the pH level. Your county extension office can send your soil sampleto the UGA Plant Services Lab. The lab will test your soil and make lime and nutrientrecommendations specific to the plants you want to put in that soil. Planting during winter assures that the young plants are dormant, Krewer said. Plantingactively growing trees and plants decreases the chances the plants will survive.last_img read more

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