Press release: Landmark Agriculture Bill to deliver a Green Brexit

first_img The introduction of the Agriculture Bill is an historic moment as we leave the EU and move towards a brighter future for farming. After nearly 50 years of being tied to burdensome and outdated EU rules, we have an opportunity to deliver a Green Brexit. This Bill will allow us to reward farmers who protect our environment, leaving the countryside in a cleaner, greener and healthier state for future generations. Critically, we will also provide the smooth and gradual transition that farmers and land managers need to plan ahead. Legislation to deliver a cleaner and healthier environment for future generations after nearly half a century under EU rules is being introduced into Parliament today (12 September).The Agriculture Bill sets out how farmers and land managers will in future be paid for “public goods”, such as better air and water quality, improved soil health, higher animal welfare standards, public access to the countryside and measures to reduce flooding.This will replace the current subsidy system of Direct Payments, which is ineffective and pays farmers based on the total amount of land farmed. These payments are skewed towards the largest landowners and are not linked to any specific public benefits. The top 10% of recipients currently receive almost 50% of total payments, while the bottom 20% receive just 2%.In its place, a new Environmental Land Management system will start from next year. The government will work together with farmers to design, develop and trial the new approach. Under the new system, farmers and land managers who provide the greatest environmental benefits will secure the largest rewards, laying the foundations for a Green Brexit.The Bill will also be underpinned by measures to increase productivity and invest in (R&D).For example, there will be funding available for farmers to come together to develop and get the research projects that they want and need, whether that be on soil health or sustainable livestock farming . This will lead to practical gains for farmers that help them become more profitable and reduce their environmental footprint.The government will also be able to make payments during the seven year transition period for famers to invest in new technologies and methods that boost productivity.Environment Secretary Michael Gove said: Farmers will be supported over a seven year transition period as we as leave the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).For 2019, Direct Payments will be made on the same basis as now, subject to simplifications where possible. Direct Payments for 2020 will also be made in much the same way as now. Simplifications will be made as soon as possible, subject to the terms of the overall Brexit implementation period. There will then be an agricultural transition period in England between 2021 and 2027 as payments are gradually phased out.During consultation, there was a widespread support for applying reductions to Direct Payments more widely. All farmers will therefore see some reduction to their payments from the start of the transition, although those who receive the highest payments will see bigger reductions initially. This will free up funds to invest in public goods.To help new entrants get into the sector and give farmers flexibility to plan for the future, Direct Payments during the agricultural transition period up until 2027 will be “delinked” from the requirement to farm the land.These payments, which may be calculated according to money received in previous years, can be used by farmers to invest in their business, diversify their activities or else retire from farming and give way for new people to enter.The Bill also sets out how the government will strengthen transparency in the supply chain to help farmers get a better deal in the marketplace.By collecting data from across the supply chain, the government will help food producers strengthen their negotiating position at the farm gate and seek a fairer return.The introduction of the Agriculture Bill now means that all the necessary measures will be in place for the start of the agricultural transition in 2021, delivering a smooth transition to the new domestic policy.last_img read more

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Mobile World Congress 2014: What a Difference a Year Makes

first_imgI just returned from Barcelona, Spain where the largest service provider event of the year was held: Mobile World Congress 2014. A year ago, not long after joining EMC, Paul Maritz and I attended MWC2013 based on a view that the service provider and off-premise ecosystem would become increasingly important to the EMC federation of businesses (EMC, VMware, Pivotal and RSA). We met with most of the major telecom companies in the world and, universally, they recognized the value of the EMC focus on driving cloud technology and our new focus on building a platform for big data, analytics and modern applications. As I mentioned last year, we left exhausted but excited by the validation of our EMC focus.This year the activity level was an order of magnitude higher. EMC, VMware and Pivotal were all present. In addition to Paul Maritz and me, VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger and EMC Chairman and CEO Joe Tucci also attended.On Wednesday, Joe gave a keynote address that covered the shift to the third platform and how this will result in hundreds of billions of connected devices, the Internet of Things, and millions of new applications. The enabling trends are Cloud, Social, Mobile and Big Data. A key takeaway was that this is inevitable and will disrupt industries.Beyond sharing our view, Joe invited the industry to establish a portable and agile cloud experience by joining the Cloud Foundry community. On Monday, Pivotal announced that Cloud Foundry has moved to a true, open source foundation with the initial members including IBM, HP, Rackspace, and SAP. Many global service providers are already engaged, including NTT, Swisscom, Centurylink, Verizon, and CSC. Joe’s message was clear: the industry needs cloud portability, agility, and an open cloud operating system. Cloud Foundry is the best way to achieve this critical objective.One of the most tangible examples of the traction we are making in the service provider’s future was Joe’s discussion of the Real Time Intelligence (RTI) solution Pivotal has created. We had an early prototype of this offering at MWC2013 and were looking for service provider partners to work with in moving it to reality. We ended up with a long list of operators looking to engage and we began that process. The leading partner for this effort was Vodafone. Fast forward to 2014: we now have the RTI system in Vodafone’s live wireless networks and it has been productized.RTI is a new kind of real time big data platform for a wide range of environments including telecom operators. The RTI system is based on the Pivotal One technologies and provides the ability to access and reason over large, diverse data sets ranging from subscriber databases to billing systems and network information. We then add the Pivotal in-memory real-time analytics to the system to be able to capture and process huge volumes of events coming from the carrier infrastructure. In the Vodafone example, the system ingests over a million events per second collected from the signaling stream of the wireless network. Finally the RTI system is organized as a platform that allows rapid development of new big data applications.In fact, in the Vodafone booth, their Spanish operation wanted to show RTI being used to track and model people and traffic flow over Barcelona in real time. Since their RTI platform was already in place, a new application was developed and deployed in only a few weeks. The system worked by tracing the Vodafone ES employees as they moved throughout the city. You could see in real time how they moved and where they clustered, visualized against 3D maps of the city. In one very interesting view you could see when anonymized employees showed up at the MWC venue and how many were present at any time in the specific halls and sub areas of the site. You could also see where they came from, what parts of the city they passed through, and, given a large enough data set, even visualize population flow in real time to better understand congestion and transportation performance.The key difference between RTI and the existing operator solutions is that RTI creates a common way to collect, manage and reason through your big data and real time data via a modern platform that is optimized for new application development and diverse data sources. We know of hundreds of use cases that RTI can be leveraged to address (from churn management to NPS score visibility and network optimizations)… as a single uniform platform with each use case just means a new application. From concept to product in a little over a year was pretty good progress and exciting to see.Joe closed out by highlighting the EMC progress in building clouds, driving the evolution of storage to accommodate cloud models, and evolving the mobile technology space. He showed off our mobile file sync and share collaboration technology, Syncplicity. Unlike consumer oriented offerings, this system not only provides slick, mobile friendly integration of the user experience but also allows for customer choice of where to store the data (in the cloud, in their data center, hybrid, etc.). In addition to Syncplicity, Joe highlighted VMware’s announced acquisition of Airwatch, which gives VMware the leading technology in Enterprise Mobility management and adds to the already broad end user computing capability within the VMware portfolio. Finally, he told the audience how EMC is helping them manage data at Exabyte scale. It took 26 years to ship a total of 1EB of storage. Last year, EMC shipped that much in a month. Now, we are seeing some individual deals that approach an Exabyte in size.What a difference a year makes! We believe that IT and Telecom are coming together and that EMC technical capability is at the core of this new environment. Mobile World Congress 2014 and the significant visibility of the EMC federation certainly reinforce this.last_img read more

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Food Security Council creates plan of action

first_imgThe West Side Food Security Council — a coalition of 16 community leaders and six Notre Dame students — met Jan. 28 to create a plan of action in addressing the problem of food insecurity in South Bend. Student government’s eND Hunger campaign, an initiative of the student body president Catherine Soler and student body vice president Andrew Bell’s administration, led the council’s formation. Beth Simpson, chair of the campaign, said residents are not having trouble with the amount of food so much as the type of food they have access to. “There’s a high percentage of South Bend residents who experience food insecurity. Food security is the more proper way to describe hunger in America today,” she said. “Americans today aren’t struggling with a lack of food in general but rather a lack of healthy food options.” Simpson said a crucial initial step in addressing the issue was soliciting community feedback. “We sought first of all to gauge what it is the community articulates as its needs,” she said. This feedback was fielded during three meetings with the council, the third of which resulted in two solutions for food insecurity, the first of which is in the form of direct aid for families eligible for food stamps. “The fund will double the value of purchases made by food stamps and WIC [Women Infants Children] on local, healthy produce,” she said. “Our council, right now, is seeking to articulate the exact structure of this fund as well as beginning to look into funding opportunities.” The second facet of the plan is a community center focused on nutrition-related issues. The Student International Business Council will be heading up the business planning of the center, which will be constructed in the LaSalle Square area — an area of high poverty. “It’s one of the regions of highest poverty, around LaSalle Square. It’s an identified food desert, so there is no access to a grocery store,” she said. “Within the two mile radius of LaSalle square, 28 percent of the residents have a [household] income of less than $15,000, and 50 percent have an income of less than $28,000 a year, meaning 50 percent of them are food-stamp eligible.” The community center would house the Urban Garden Market, one of the non-profits whose leaders serve on the council. The center could also hold a small-scale grocer and possibly house the Purple Porch Co-op, another member of the council, which could potentially vend produce to residents. Simpson said the center would also serve as a place for residents to engage the problem of food insecurity personally. “Our center will have a kitchen in it. That kitchen will be used for cooking demonstrations and nutritional education,” she said. “We’re also looking into how to incorporate micro-venturing within the center. We recognize sustainability is key but most important is that the community has ownership and is invested.” The council’s work, Simpson said, is a unique opportunity for the Notre Dame community to work with the South Bend community in a multitude of ways. “It’s exciting for Notre Dame students because this is an entirely organic initiative. The council arose because of the vision of Notre Dame student government and the Center for Social Concerns coming together,” she said. After the council meets on the Feb. 18 to break into subcommittees, Simpson plans to hold an informational meeting for students looking to get involved, tentatively scheduled for Feb. 21. “I encourage interested students to attend the meeting on the 21st and also just to contact me at [email protected]” Simpson said the council’s work is a natural extension of the University’s mission as a Catholic institution. “It’s Catholic identity is one thing that distinguishes this University, in particular that our academics are driven by a core set of values, among them service to the community,” she said. “This initiative represents a means by which students can engage through service, academics and direct involvement in the community to live out the University’s Catholic mission.”last_img read more

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3 takeaways from Syracuse’s 82-51 national championship loss to Connecticut

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ INDIANAPOLIS — Brittney Sykes jogged off the court with 2:38 remaining in Syracuse’s season, and looked straight in the eyes of her head coach. Quentin Hillsman held the sides of her head and spoke softly to his embattled veteran guard, possibly playing the last game of her career, then kissed her on the forehead and sent her down the bench.“It was surreal,” Sykes said of exiting the court after sharing a moment with her head coach. “He was proud of me, there’s not much you can say right then and there.”It provided picturesque finality to a game that seemed out of reach from the moment Syracuse lost the opening tipoff. Connecticut (38-0, 18-0 American Athletic) ended Syracuse’s (30-8, 13-3 Atlantic Coast) miracle March run, winning its fourth straight national championship, 82-51.Here are three takeaways from Syracuse’s season ending loss in its first-ever championship game.Homecoming queenAdvertisementThis is placeholder textBreanna Stewart, the North Syracuse native, played her hometown team Tuesday for the first time since the 2013 Big East tournament. After winning the opening tip by a hands-length over Briana Day, she never relented her stranglehold on the last game of her illustrious career.“She has accomplished something that nobody else in NCAA women’s basketball has,” Sykes said. “And that’s four consecutive (championships).“Her last one just happened to be against us, and yeah, it stings.”The Connecticut senior class swept a career of championships, with starters Moriah Jefferson and Morgan Tuck joining Stewart atop college basketball’s landscape.Stewart spurned a collegiate offer to play for the Orange out of high school, but called this game a “full-circle” type of moment for her career and was happy the program took the next step to reach its first national championship. Unfortunately for Syracuse, Stewart tripped SU as it tried to step up to college basketball’s mountaintop.It took 68 seconds for her to showcase her all-encompassing skillset. Brittney Sykes drove the paint on SU’s second possession and her shot was met promptly by Stewart’s hand for a clean block. The 6-foot-4 UConn guard drove the length of the court and hit a 3 in the face of Sykes to give the Huskies an early 4-0 lead.She hit two more 3s than SU’s best deep shooter, Brianna Butler, and nabbed seven more rebounds the Orange’s best big, Briana Day. Everything Syracuse could do, Stewart could do better. And it wasn’t close.She finished the first half with 14 points, and appropriate finished her career game with more tallies on her stat line than anyone else. Her 24 points, three 3s and ten rebounds were all more than anyone else on the floor Tuesday night.Boarded upSyracuse struggled to put together any scoring runs largely because it just didn’t have the ball. The Orange was bruised badly on the boards, at one point getting out-rebounded 17-4 in the first quarter before finishing the game in a 43-27 deficit.With 3:43 remaining in the first half, Bria Day was the only Syracuse player with more than one rebound. She had two. Morgan Tuck and Stewart teamed up to bully SU under the basket, finishing with a combined 17 rebounds, and even the chances Syracuse had it usually couldn’t hold on to.Isabella Slim and Briana Day fumbled the ball back and forth after a missed 3 by Peterson, and Jefferson promptly intervened to begin another Huskies possession.“You have to rebound,” Briana Day said. “With such a good rebounding team like (Connecticut) we have to rebound. And we didn’t.”At the end of the opening 20 minutes, four UConn players had at least four rebounds, more than any other Syracuse player.Off their gameSyracuse has gotten this far running off its blueprint of fast-paced scoring and press defense. The press causes a surplus of turnovers that the Orange have been able to hit 3s in transition. It took more deep shots than any team in the ACC, and in turn, made the most.Led by active leader in career 3s, Brianna Butler, who went 1-of-4 from deep, Syracuse shot wildly to try and overcome the Huskies ever-growing lead. SU finished the first half only 2-of-12 from behind the arc, with the only other 3 coming out of the hand of Taylor Ford in her handful of minutes played.“We were just excited,” Maggie Morrison said. “I think we were trying to get some of our excitement out. Playing a little too fast, taking quick shots.”The ambitious shot by Butler served as a microcosm of her team’s early-shooting struggles, seemingly shaken by college basketball’s biggest stage. Peterson then missed a 3 after Butler. Sykes clanked a jumper. Butler missed another 3 before Sykes finally got points next to Syracuse’s name on the scoreboard.After 12 attempts from deep in the first half, Syracuse pumped the brakes on its aggressive shooting. Peterson started settling for mid-range jumpers, and Butler took only one 3 in the first 15 minutes of the second half. The less ambitious shooting served better for SU’s field-goal percentage, but aside from a 14-0 third-quarter run, didn’t push the scoreboard anymore in their favor.“Well Coach Q told us any shot we get is a good shot when you’re going against a good basketball game,” guard Cornelia Fondren said. “Any shot we took we had to take it.“But we weren’t making shots.” Comments Published on April 5, 2016 at 9:40 pm Contact Connor: [email protected] | @connorgrossmanlast_img read more

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Syracuse doubles breaks 5-game losing streak against Louisville

first_img Published on March 1, 2020 at 5:43 pm Contact Christopher: [email protected] | @chrisscargs Louisville assistant coach Kevin Fulton stared across Drumlins Country Club while scratching his goatee and then ducked his head down when he began to walk across court three to his first doubles pairing. Andrea Di Palma had just rocketed a shot past Syracuse’s Zeynep Erman and Guzal Yusupova’s baseline and furthered the Orange’s lead to 5-2. Fulton crouched by the bench near Di Palma and her partner, Rhea Verma, clapping as he encouraged them. The chat didn’t help. Syracuse clinched its first set of its doubles point through Louisville’s first double loss. For the past five matches, it was Syracuse head coach Younes Limam who would bow his head as one of his doubles pairs smashed balls into the net, missed an easy shot or sent hits out of bounds. But on Sunday, in SU’s 4-3 win over Louisville (8-4, 0-3 Atlantic Coast), Syracuse (8-2, 3-1) snapped its five-game losing streak on the doubles point after a complete switch of Limam’s doubles teams on Feb. 23 against Duke. Since the Duke match, every SU player has a new doubles partner.“Going into Friday I knew it was going to be tough,” Limam said after the Louisville win. “When you play with somebody you haven’t played with yet it takes a little bit of time.”After winning the coin toss, Yusupova and Erman, in their second time playing together this season, retreated to the right side of court three and Yusupova took position to serve. After a starting six-hit rally, Di Palma with her back facing the net knocked a winner past the Syracuse duo. But with Erman’s drop shots and net hits in Louisville’s doubles alleys, Syracuse locked down the first point and held their serve.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter a three-game push for Syracuse’s first singles duo, Louisville began firing backcourt winners that neither Erman nor Yusupova could reach. But the Orange eventually accumulated a 5-2 lead, which had Fulton fired up in the hopes of a comeback for his team. After a set comeback from Louisville, SU volunteer assistant coach Len Lopoo shouted, “Right here, you two, let’s go.” After that, Verma released a forehand straight into her net, earning Syracuse the first-doubles win and pushing the Orange to only need one more point to clinch.Eyes began to turn to courts one and two to see if either Syracuse’s freshman and senior third doubles pairing of Kim Hansen and Miranda Ramirez or second doubles of Sonya Treshcheva and Sofya Golubovskaya could win their matches. Golubovskaya and Treshcheva couldn’t break Louisville’s serve and gave Louisville a 1-0 lead. But with Golubovskaya serving and Treshcheva at the net, Treshcheva snuck balls close over the net into Louisville’s alley and out of reach for Louisville, tying the match at one set apiece. “It’s really great for us to get that doubles point against a really good team,” said Ramirez. “So I think it will give us a lot of confidence going forward.”After breaking Louisville’s serve, Syracuse’s second doubles duo grew its lead in tandem with Hansen and Ramirez, with the score cards at one point on both their courts reading 3-1 Syracuse. But after a slight push from Treshcheva and Golubovskaya, the latter eventually fired a forehand winner past Louisville’s and won their match 6-4. Soon after, Ramirez and Hansen shook hands with their opponents. Their match became inconsequential after SU clinched the overall point. But as Syracuse clinched its first doubles point after five straight losses, there was no celebration. The Orange still had to win the match and wandered to their respective courts to eventually gain their second win of the weekend.“Tennis is a big game of confidence,” said Limam. “All three courts did a great job of having a great start and keeping their foot on the gas.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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