Stocks open lower on Wall Street, Treasury yields climb

first_img Twitter Screens showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI), left, and the foreign exchange rate between U.S. dollar and South Korean won are seen at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Shares were mostly lower in Asia on Thursday after a mixed session on Wall Street as losses by technology and industrial companies offset other gains. Pinterest Local NewsBusinessUS NewsWorld News Pinterest Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 18, 2021 TAGS  center_img Previous articleGlobal Fingerprint Sensor Market Report 2021: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis 2013-2024 – ResearchAndMarkets.comNext articleSoccer official wants Champions League entry shared wider Digital AIM Web Support Facebook Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp Stocks open lower on Wall Street, Treasury yields climblast_img read more

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Mendoza takes top spot in rankings

first_imgThe Mendoza College of Business was named the top undergraduate business school in the nation for the first time in Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s fifth annual rankings, which were released March 4.Notre Dame, which was ranked second in 2009, finished ahead of the business schools of University of Virginia, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and University of Pennsylvania. The criteria include students’ response to teachers, SAT scores, recruiters’ responses to students and student-faculty ratio.“Students boasting about the school’s commitment to ethics, Catholic beliefs and passionate professors helped land Mendoza in first place,” the BusinessWeek article said. “During an economic crisis that has left many young people unemployed, Mendoza also managed a strong showing in career placement, with 95 percent of grads landing a job offer within three months of graduation.”Carolyn Woo, dean of the Mendoza College of Business, said the University’s top spot was “not a sudden event,” noting that the school had been ranked high in the past. “We never set out to excel in the rankings,” she said. “We were doing what we were doing before the rankings. The goal was not to win according to the criteria of the rankings.”Woo said commitment to undergraduate education was the motivating factor for the College’s rise.“What got us there is we are very serious about the education of our students,” she said. “If our students do their part we will do our part.”Woo offered the example of the new Junior Research Challenge: Foresight in Business & Society course, which became a part of the required curriculum last year.“As painful as the Foresight course is … it is really to give our students the skills to look at future issues and trends,” she said. “Our eye is always on the preparation of our students.”Woo said the College’s effective and hardworking faculty, challenging curriculum and devotion to Notre Dame’s core principles helped the school receive high marks from students and recruiters.“When recruiters rank us highly, they probably look at a couple of different things such as how well our students are prepared academically, people skills and ethical judgment,” she said.In addition, Woo credited the entire Notre Dame experience, ranging from First Year of Studies to dorm life, as factors.“We’re not trying to be different,” she said. “We did this because we want to be faithful to the Notre Dame mission.”Woo said the commitment of director Lee Svete and his entire Career Center team were also vital in helping the College claim the top spot, as were the alumni who helped students find jobs.“The alumni really stepped up,” she said.However, Notre Dame is still behind its peers in a few of the items, including a high student to faculty ratio of 19 to 1, lower SATs and lower salaries for faculty members.Woo said many of these statistical issues stem from Mendoza’s policy of admitting anyone who was originally admitted to Notre Dame.“We found that students flourish as business majors,” she said. “Their skills and education background are highly valued.”Woo has resisted the temptation to cap the number of students admitted to Mendoza, largely because freshman year GPA and SAT scores are not adequate measures of long term success.“We are not going to change our policy of how we accept students just so we can be higher in the rankings,” she said. “Our mission is to serve people.”Woo said she had more faith in the BusinessWeek rankings then similar systems largely because they exclude peer evaluations and are more objective.“No rankings are perfect, but I have to say that the BusinessWeek rankings have more legitimate items than other rankings,” she said.Nonetheless, Woo said she would never tailor Mendoza’s curriculum to the rankings.“We were not trying to be number one,” she said. “We’re glad to be recognized as number one, but we have certain principles and commitments that we’re going to always keep.”Woo said she doesn’t believe Notre Dame’s top ranking will lead to a glut of students applying to Mendoza.“This is nothing new because we were number three and then we were number two, so it’s not like all of a sudden we became excellent,” she said. “I hope that people don’t come into the business school unless they are interested in business, but it could generate more interest.”Woo said Mendoza’s top spot was representative of the University’s overall constant striving for excellence.“This is a school to honor the Blessed Mother, and [University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh] once said, mediocrity is not the way we honor the Blessed Mother,” she said. “Everything we do, we should do it as well as we can. We did what we did because it is our mission.”last_img read more

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Food Security Council creates plan of action

first_imgThe West Side Food Security Council — a coalition of 16 community leaders and six Notre Dame students — met Jan. 28 to create a plan of action in addressing the problem of food insecurity in South Bend. Student government’s eND Hunger campaign, an initiative of the student body president Catherine Soler and student body vice president Andrew Bell’s administration, led the council’s formation. Beth Simpson, chair of the campaign, said residents are not having trouble with the amount of food so much as the type of food they have access to. “There’s a high percentage of South Bend residents who experience food insecurity. Food security is the more proper way to describe hunger in America today,” she said. “Americans today aren’t struggling with a lack of food in general but rather a lack of healthy food options.” Simpson said a crucial initial step in addressing the issue was soliciting community feedback. “We sought first of all to gauge what it is the community articulates as its needs,” she said. This feedback was fielded during three meetings with the council, the third of which resulted in two solutions for food insecurity, the first of which is in the form of direct aid for families eligible for food stamps. “The fund will double the value of purchases made by food stamps and WIC [Women Infants Children] on local, healthy produce,” she said. “Our council, right now, is seeking to articulate the exact structure of this fund as well as beginning to look into funding opportunities.” The second facet of the plan is a community center focused on nutrition-related issues. The Student International Business Council will be heading up the business planning of the center, which will be constructed in the LaSalle Square area — an area of high poverty. “It’s one of the regions of highest poverty, around LaSalle Square. It’s an identified food desert, so there is no access to a grocery store,” she said. “Within the two mile radius of LaSalle square, 28 percent of the residents have a [household] income of less than $15,000, and 50 percent have an income of less than $28,000 a year, meaning 50 percent of them are food-stamp eligible.” The community center would house the Urban Garden Market, one of the non-profits whose leaders serve on the council. The center could also hold a small-scale grocer and possibly house the Purple Porch Co-op, another member of the council, which could potentially vend produce to residents. Simpson said the center would also serve as a place for residents to engage the problem of food insecurity personally. “Our center will have a kitchen in it. That kitchen will be used for cooking demonstrations and nutritional education,” she said. “We’re also looking into how to incorporate micro-venturing within the center. We recognize sustainability is key but most important is that the community has ownership and is invested.” The council’s work, Simpson said, is a unique opportunity for the Notre Dame community to work with the South Bend community in a multitude of ways. “It’s exciting for Notre Dame students because this is an entirely organic initiative. The council arose because of the vision of Notre Dame student government and the Center for Social Concerns coming together,” she said. After the council meets on the Feb. 18 to break into subcommittees, Simpson plans to hold an informational meeting for students looking to get involved, tentatively scheduled for Feb. 21. “I encourage interested students to attend the meeting on the 21st and also just to contact me at [email protected]” Simpson said the council’s work is a natural extension of the University’s mission as a Catholic institution. “It’s Catholic identity is one thing that distinguishes this University, in particular that our academics are driven by a core set of values, among them service to the community,” she said. “This initiative represents a means by which students can engage through service, academics and direct involvement in the community to live out the University’s Catholic mission.”last_img read more

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Rare astronomical phenomenon visible Sunday night, weather permitting

first_imgMoon Enters Umbra—6:34p7:34p8:34p9:34p10:34p Moon Leaves Umbra8:51p9:51p10:51p11:51p12:51a1:51a Batesville, In. — On Sunday night into Monday morning, January 20-21, 2019, a spectacular total lunar eclipse will occur. Weather permitting, totality will be particularly dramatic over North America, where January’s full Wolf Moon will glow an eerie coppery hue high in the dark and crisp winter sky.A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth passes between the Sun and Moon, and lines up precisely so that it completely blocks the Sun’s light, which otherwise reflects off the Moon. A lunar eclipse can occur only when there is a full Moon.Totality—the time the Moon will spend in the Earth’s shadow— will last 1 hour and 2 minutes. The eclipse will begin when the Moon enters the faint outer portion (called the penumbra) of the Earth’s shadow about an hour before it begins moving into the umbra. The penumbra, however, is all but invisible to the eye until the Moon becomes deeply immersed in it. Sharp-eyed viewers may get their first glimpse of the penumbra as a faint “smudge” on the left part of the Moon’s disk about a half hour after it first enters the penumbral shadow. See Eclipse Timetable, below.The most noticeable part of this lunar eclipse will come when the Moon begins to enter the Earth’s dark inner shadow (called the umbra). A small scallop of darkness will begin to appear on the Moon’s left edge shortly after it has begun to enter the umbra.Eclipse watchers from the Hawaiian Islands will see a different—but still stirring—spectacle: the eclipse will already be in progress when the Moon rises at sunset, with roughly half of the Moon already immersed in shadow. As evening twilight deepens and the Moon gradually becomes more and more immersed in the Earth’s shadow, it will become transformed into a ruddy, ghostly orb.During a lunar eclipse, the Moon can sometimes turn red. The light reaching the Moon resembles the “color of blood,” and is sometimes called a “Blood Moon” which can be a bit unsettling. But the explanation is simple:“During a total lunar eclipse, white sunlight hitting the atmosphere on the sides of the Earth gets absorbed and then radiated out (scattered). Blue-colored light is most affected,” NASA officials wrote online. “That is, the atmosphere filters out (scatters away) most of the blue-colored light. What’s left over is the orange- and red-colored light.”January 20-21 Total Lunar Eclipse Timetable Mid-Eclipse7:13p8:13p9:13p10:13p11:13p12:13a Total Eclipse Ends7:43p8:43p9:43p10:43p11:43p12:43a HISTAKSTPSTMSTCSTESTcenter_img While the Farmers’ Almanac is mostly known for its advance weather forecasts, it has also been an important astronomy resource for over two centuries, including eclipses and full Moons.For more information, visit www.FarmersAlmanac.com. Total Eclipse Begins6:41p7:41p8:41p9:41p10:41p11:41p Moon Leaves Penumbra9:48p10:48p11:48p12:48a1:48a2:48a Moon Enters Penumbra——6:36p7:36p8:36p9:36plast_img read more

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