Sheffield named chief development officer at Art Museums

first_imgThe Harvard Art Museums are pleased to announce the appointment of Melanie Sheffield as chief development officer, a new leadership position in the museums’ Office of Institutional Advancement; she will assume the role on March 4, 2019. The chief development officer will provide strategic direction for the planning and execution of all functions related to development, in alignment with the museums’ mission, vision, and goals. Sheffield comes to the museums from Boston Ballet, where she has served since 2013, first as director of individual giving and then as director of development, a promotion she received during her first year with the organization. She is returning to the museums for this new role, having previously served as assistant director of membership and special programs in 2005–06.With over 17 years of fundraising and development experience in cultural and higher education institutions, Sheffield brings a wealth of knowledge and insight to her new role at the museums. She has a deep understanding of the philanthropic landscape in Boston and beyond, and has worked with some of the region’s foremost donors. She established Boston Ballet’s first planned giving program and is personally responsible for a portfolio of 50 of the ballet’s top prospects and donors.“We are extraordinarily fortunate to welcome someone of Melanie’s caliber to our team at the Harvard Art Museums,” said Martha Tedeschi, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director. “She is perfectly positioned to build on the success we have had in generating enthusiasm and support for our unique teaching and research mission. Her passion for the arts is palpable and inspiring; I look forward to her energy and ideas as we forge new paths in stewarding our fundraising efforts, strengthening relationships with current friends, and reaching out to bring others into our network of supporters.”Prior to her work at Boston Ballet, Sheffield served in development leadership roles at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (2010–13: director of advancement; director of the president’s council) and Wentworth Institute of Technology (2006–10: interim vice president of institutional advancement; major gifts officer; director of the annual fund and donor relations). Sheffield earned a B.A. in communications from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1999, with a minor in history of art and architecture.“I am thrilled to be returning to the Harvard Art Museums as the new chief development officer and to partner with Director Martha Tedeschi in advancing the museums’ exceptional mission,” said Sheffield. “As an ardent supporter of the arts, it is an honor to join this community and to have the opportunity to engage current friends and create new connections with those interested in investing in the museums’ vibrant future.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Are you speaking the right language to your members?

first_imgDuring the opening session of the CUNA Governmental Affairs Conference on Monday, March 11, Executive Director of the Foundation, Gigi Hyland, took the stage. She started out by demonstrating the power of our language when it comes to greetings – how East-coasters might greet one another with a “how ah ya?”; how those from Hawaii say “aloha”; millennials and their use of emojis; etc. This topic of language and how it’s relative and specific to different states, regions and countries applies not only to our verbal dialect, but also relates to how we “speak” to our credit union members. Are we really speaking the language of our members? This means, are you sure that the products and services that you are providing for your members are really aligning with their needs? A great example of this was demonstrated by a map of the D.C area and the life expectancy of those living in downtown Washington, DC versus those living just 20 miles away. These numbers were different from each other by seven years. Why?Those living within the city had a lower life expectancy because many people have less access to affordable housing, food, and financial services. We know that when people are struggling financially, this doesn’t just impact their wallets but their mental and physical health as well.Speaking the language of our members means knowing where they are in life and understanding that financial health is related to physical health – and it’s crucial that we start making this connection to find solutions. The Foundation is a catalyst for change in the credit union movement by igniting understanding around financial health and finding those solutions. Coming up in April, the Foundation, BALANCE and the California and Nevada Credit Union Leagues will be jointly hosting the CU FINHEALTH19 Conference. This conference brings together leading experts in the field for engaging and interactive discussions on the topics of member financial health.This conference is a great way to connect with others who are focusing in on member financial health, as well as an opportunity to learn strategies, tactics and measurable ways to better serve your most valuable asset – your members. The Foundation also has a whitepaper entitled, “Health and Financial Well-Being: Two Things That Go Better Together”.We hope to see you at CU FINHEALTH next month so we can continue working on speaking the right language to improve member financial health! 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lacey Yasick Lacey is the Communications Manager for the National Credit Union Foundation. She works to develop and execute all communication efforts that support the Foundation’s national programs and engagement strategy.Lacey … Web: www.ncuf.coop Detailslast_img read more

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NCAA violations could affect head coaches

first_imgAfter so much speculation about Auburn quarterback Cam Newton, the NCAA is not only keeping a close watch on players, but coaches as well.In a move proposed by the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), secondary recruiting violations such as exceeding phone-call limits or sending a text message to a recruit could result in a suspension of one or more games for coaches.The proposal was approved in mid-September by the NCAA Division I and II Committees on Infractions.Grant Teaff, executive director of the AFCA, said his group to do its best possible to keep an eye on what is happening.“This is our request: Anything that has to do with recruiting, if there’s a proven violation, we want the ability for the NCAA to say this will cost you a week or a maximum of two weeks,” Teaff said.  “We as an association asked for that, and they granted that.”Secondary violations, which schools often report, also include: commenting on a recruit before he has signed a letter-of-intent, posting comments on other public social media sites and talking with a recruit during a non-contact period.For more information on USC athletics, follow Daily Trojan sports on twitter @DT_Sportslast_img read more

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