JICMAIL launches to provide mail media metrics

first_img  144 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 JICMAIL launches to provide mail media metrics Melanie May | 22 January 2018 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. New Joint Industry Committee (JIC) for Mail has launched JICMAIL: media metrics for direct mail, based on research on audience engagement with the channel.JICMAIL aims to help users of direct mail and suppliers of the channel understand the power of mail by providing data of the same standards as similar metrics for television, radio, outdoor and press. This aims to help to create a level playing field for all media channels and deliver a clear understanding of their respective values.JICMAIL’s Board is chaired by DMA Group CEO Chris Combermale and includes representatives from industry bodies and businesses including the DMA, IPA, ISBA, Royal Mail and Whistl to represent both users of the channel and relevant suppliers.How it worksJICMAIL data is collected using a panel weighted to NRS. Over each quarter JICMAIL tracks the mail activity of 1,000 households. Panellists record the mail they receive for a week and subsequent mail actions for three more weeks. Panellists are then removed from the panel and “rested” to avoid panel fatigue.JICMAIL provides audience data for mail, measuring the readership, reach and frequency of exposure to each item that comes through the letterbox. This data is captured, in partnership with Kantar TNS, using a diary that follows each piece of mail for four weeks in a nationally representative sample of 1,000 households per quarter across the UK.Two quarters of data collection have already taken place, with JICMAIL surveying 1,846 households.Key insights from this include:On average, 51% of all mail is read immediately – whether addressed or door drop – with a further 19% followed up on laterIn addition, each piece that enters the home is revisited 3.8 times on average across either format21% of all addressed mail and door drop items go on to create commercial actions, for example prompting a purchase, visiting a website or going to a physical storeFollowing the initial launch of this first six months’ worth of data, a quarterly report will be issued highlighting the latest insight from the panel data, administered through Kantar TNS, which can be found at www.JICMail.org.uk.Chris Combemale said: Advertisementcenter_img Tagged with: data direct mail DMA research “Traditionally, direct mail has been measured on ‘after-the-event’ impacts like ROI, but these new metrics will provide insight at the all-important planning stage, enabling it to go head-to-head with other media when budgets are being allocated. Clients are increasingly demanding accountability for every penny they invest and in 2018 planners will finally be able to compare directly between mail and other media channels. The fact that this is a cross-industry initiative highlights the importance of the JICMAIL research and continued influence of the channel.”Mike Colling, Member of the JICMAIL Board, IPA member and Founder and CEO MC&C, said:“What JICMAIL does, for the first time, is normalise mail to bring it in-line with every other major channel. It gives us exactly the same data across these channels, allowing marketers to compare apples to apples when it comes to their media planning. Moving mail from being a special case being dealt with in a silo and put it in the hands of the media planners and buyers.”  143 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12last_img read more

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The man with the ‘golden ear’

first_imgIt’s not often that Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow gets rattled. But then, it’s not every day that Clive Davis, the legendary record label executive, producer, and talent nurturer, stops by Wasserstein Hall to reminisce about his illustrious, six-decade career in the music industry.“I have interviewed Supreme Court justices, I’ve been with presidents of countries, I am so nervous!” Minow told Davis, LL.B. ’56, Friday afternoon as they chatted about Davis’ improbable journey as a poor Jewish kid from Brooklyn who made it to Harvard Law School (HLS) on a scholarship and went on to become one of the most successful and revered figures in music business history.“I had no clue that music would be part of my life,” Davis said. “When you have no money, when you get by on scholarships, your work ethic becomes part of it — the fear that if you don’t maintain a certain average you’ll lose your scholarship just creates the drive, the determination, the scared necessity” to constantly push to get ahead in school and then in one’s career.Now chief creative officer at Sony Music Entertainment, Davis, 82, is perhaps the last of the larger-than-life star-makers who once ran the record business. Starting at Columbia Records in the early 1960s, then with Arista Records in the 1970s into the ’90s, and finally, J Records in the 2000s, Davis made his name as a shrewd negotiator who was blessed with “golden ears” for identifying hits and grooming future superstars. The winner of five Grammys, including the Grammy Trustees Lifetime Achievement award, Davis is among the few nonperformers to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.Davis joined Columbia Records’ legal staff just a few years after graduating with honors from HLS. Among his early tasks was to inform the label’s prickly, young folk singer Bob Dylan that lyrics to his “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues,” equating the ultraconservative anti-Communist group with Nazism, were potentially libelous and needed to be rewritten. Dylan, who famously stormed off “The Ed Sullivan Show” set after being told he couldn’t perform the song on live television, refused. Fearing a lawsuit, Columbia yanked the song from his just-shipped album, “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan,” and replacing it with four new tracks, including the future classics “Masters of War” and “Girl From the North Country.” When Dylan tried to void his recording contract not long after, claiming he had been underage when he signed it, Davis successfully kept the headstrong musician from bolting to a competitor.Shortly after rising from general counsel to president in 1967, Davis transformed the stodgy Columbia, known then for its roster of “easy listening” artists like Johnny Mathis, Andy Williams, and Barbra Streisand and its catalogue of Broadway show tunes, into a rock powerhouse, corralling unknowns including Janis Joplin, Santana, Sly Stone and later, Pink Floyd, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, and Aerosmith, among others, into the Columbia stable.After his controversial 1973 firing, Davis headed the newly created Arista Records in 1974, promptly rekindling his reputation for finding pop hit-makers such as Barry Manilow, Carly Simon, and Hall and Oates, while still attracting and supporting edgier, less-commercial artists like Patti Smith and Lou Reed. For every Kenny G or Milli Vanilli the label put out in the 1980s, Arista took chances with unconventional acts like Eurythmics and smartly anticipated the growing popularity of country music by establishing a Nashville outpost and signing Brad Paisley, Alan Jackson, and Brooks & Dunn, among others.By the 1990s, Davis presciently formed joint ventures with Sean “Puffy” Combs’ fledgling Bad Boy Records, home to Notorious B.I.G., and LaFace Records, the label of producers L.A. Reid and Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds. Both would churn out hit after hit, becoming the decade’s top-selling hip-hop and R&B labels, respectively.But Davis was probably best known to the public for his exclusive Grammy parties and his role as consigliore to A-list divas like Aretha Franklin, Dionne Warwick, and the late Whitney Houston, whom he discovered in 1983.In 2000, Davis formed J Records after being forced into retirement by executives at BMG, Arista’s parent company. It was at J that Davis helped revive the careers of Carlos Santana and Rod Stewart while inking up-and-comers like Alicia Keys, Maroon 5, Carrie Underwood, and Kelly Clarkson.Davis, who will appear on NBC’s “The Voice” this week, just finished producing a new release from Franklin and a DVD of Whitney Houston’s best live performances, both out this month.“I do get great pleasure in finding those great talents and showing how long a career can last,” Davis said of his knack for identifying hit songs and helping extend a fading talent’s livelihood. “It doesn’t have to be ephemeral in any way.”With many more HLS students preparing for careers in the arts, business, or as entrepreneurs, Minow asked Davis for his advice to future graduates thinking about these fields. “I really felt the Law School training, on top of the previous education I had, was invaluable to me. The combination of making you think, where you can’t just memorize, and the need for an unrelenting work ethic” at HLS serves everyone well, he said, whether they intend to practice law or to move into business.Davis said streaming music services like Spotify and Pandora pay billions in licensing fees that help to offset the decline in retail music sales, but cautions it’s “too soon” to know what will result from singer Taylor Swift’s recent boycott of Spotify. “The concept of music being free is abhorrent, it’s wrong. The idea that creativity should not be rewarded is so antithetical to our culture. It’s robbing creative people of what their talent deserves in compensation for that.”One thing is sure, though. While “technology does make certain products obsolete,” he said, there’s no truth to the notion that “music is less important in our lives today than it was before.”“That is not the case,” Davis said. “The heartening thing is music is as important as ever.”last_img read more

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Freeport Motorcyclist Killed in Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 58-year-old man was killed when his motorcycle was involved in a crash with another vehicle that was making a turn in his hometown of Freeport over the weekend.Nassau County police said John Broems was riding a Harley Davidson westbound on Merrick Road when he when he struck a Honda that was turning north on Park Avenue at 9:21 a.m. Saturday.The victim was taken to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead.The driver, a 53-year-old woman with two 8-year-old boys in the back seat, was not injured.Homicide Squad detectives impounded the vehicles for tests, are continuing the investigation and found no apparent criminality.last_img

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Women’s Hockey: No. 1 Wisconsin back on the road against Minnesota State this weekend after three consecutive home matchups

first_imgThe No. 1 Wisconsin women’s hockey team (9-1-0, 3-1-0 WCHA) will take its second road trip of the season to Mankato, Minn., for a weekend game against the Minnesota State Mavericks (4-3-1, 2-3-1 WCHA). The series begins Friday.The last time the Badgers played away from Madison, they swept the Mercyhurst Lakers with ease. The team now looks to build on a successful home stint in which the Badgers went 5-1, the only loss coming in a 1-0 nail-biter Saturday against No. 3 Minnesota. Despite the loss, the team heads to Mankato riding high after an impressive 4-1 victory against Minnesota Sunday.Perhaps the most impressive part of the Badgers’ season so far, however, has been the play of freshman forward Sophie Shirley. After being named WCHA Rookie of the Week last week, Shirley was named WCHA Rookie of the Month on Thursday. She leads all freshmen with six goals and 10 points so far this season and has been a key contributor to an already skilled squad prior to her entrance. Her six goals lead the team.Volleyball: Badgers look to bounce back Sunday against WolverinesThe No. 5 University of Wisconsin Women’s Volleyball team (16-5, 9-4 Big Ten) is preparing to take on the No. Read…Following Shirley’s lead this week was fellow freshman forward Britta Curl, who received WCHA Rookie of the Week honors Tuesday for her gutsy performance against Minnesota last weekend that featured 10 shots. Curl also registered two critical points in Sunday’s victory.It is an understatement to say Wisconsin has fared well against Minnesota State in the past. The Badgers are 84-2-3 all-time against the Mavericks, including a 21-game winning streak that they will look to add upon this weekend.Minnesota State, though, is off to its strongest start since the 2012-13 season. A major reason for their success has been freshman goaltender Abigail Levy, who leads the WCHA with a .954 save percentage, good for 11th in the country. Her 1.35 goals against average is tied for second in the WCHA. Levy was named WCHA Goaltender of the Month Thursday after earning two WCHA Goaltender of the Week awards.The Badgers will be playing without a trio of key players this weekend who will be busy preparing for the upcoming Four Nations Cup. Senior Emily Clark will be representing the Hockey Canada team in her hometown of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, while fellow seniors Mikaela Gardner and Annie Pankowski were named to the USA Hockey roster. Gardner will be making her senior debut for USA Hockey.Puck drops are set for 6 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday from the Verizon Center in Mankato. Saturday’s game can be watched live on the Fox Sports North channel.last_img read more

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