Costly face-lift

first_imgWHITTIER – The cost of implementing a proposed plan to renovate Uptown Whittier could range from $40 million to $73 million over a 30-year period. It’s one of many details that Whittier officials – from City Council to planning commissioners to staff – will be discussing over the next few months as they air details of the proposed plan. The City Council and Planning Commission met Saturday in a joint meeting that council members said Monday gave them another chance to review the document. “The plan is very good, but how are we going to pay for it?” Councilman Joe Vinatieri asked. “That’s why the consultant got peppered. They still have questions to answer.” The plan – a 124-page document – lays out ways to renovate the Uptown area. It calls for new strategies to deal with parking, development, housing and the churches in the area. It now will go to the Planning Commission for study and public hearings and eventually to the City Council. The plan proposes up to $60 million for four parking structures and $6.8million for new trees on Greenleaf Avenue and Philadelphia Street. It also proposes $1.3 million to narrow Hadley Street between Greenleaf Avenue and Painter Street, $1.2 million for a traffic circle at the intersection of Philadelphia and Painter streets and $1 million for a new park in the Uptown area. Stefanos Polyzoides, partner of Moule and Polyzoides, which is writing the plan, told the council Saturday that the money won’t all be spent at once and will be dependent on actual projects being built. “You’re not ready to pull out a check book and write a $75million check,” Polyzoides said. “This is not that kind of plan,” Polyzoides said. “This is a pay-as-you-go plan. You only invest when you’re certain that doing something will deliver a project to you and bring enough collateral development to continue with the plan as a whole.” Councilman Bob Henderson said he knows that the plan’s calculations show the city should generate more than the cost through increased taxes. “But the thing that is the killer is figuring out how the timeline lays out,” Henderson said Monday. “Do you come out with $15million on Day One and 15 years later you get your money back? That’s a huge financial issue.” Mayor Cathy Warner said she agrees with her fellow council members that the plan still needs to be fine-tuned. “The other thing we have to remember is that we’ve had some public input, but we still have to continue through the process that provides for more,” Warner said. “I’m looking forward to considering what the public has to say.” Councilman Greg Nordbak said the key will be compromise. “We’re at the beginning of a very long race,” Nordbak said. “In order for us to move forward, we will need input, compromise and working with each other.” [email protected] (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Reverse-Engineering Biological Networks Challenges Caltech Scientists

first_imgEvolutionists love to quote Dobzhansky saying, “Nothing in biology makes sense apart from evolution.”  An article in the current issue of Caltech’s magazine Engineering and Science,1 however, might change that proverb to, “Nothing in biology makes sense apart from information theory and systems engineering.”  The article makes no mention of evolution, but rather looks at biology as a model of complex information processing, computation, control, logic circuits, optimization and error correction.  “TMI, meet IST,” is the title, meaning “too much information meets the office of Information Science and Technology.”  The IST is an interdisciplinary initiative at the prestigious university that draws together mathematicians, information theorists, physicists, biologists, and social scientists with the goal of understanding how information works in complex systems – biological systems providing the guiding example.  It is organized into four new centers, the Center for the Mathematics of Information (CMI), the Center for the Physics of Information, the Center for Biological Circuit Design (CBCD), and Social and Information Sciences Laboratory (SISL), and two old ones, the Center for Neuromorphic Systems Engineering (CNSE), and the Lee Center for Advanced Networking.  “Each new center attacks a basic question,” the article explains.  “Can we find an abstract mathematical description of information that applies across disciplines?  What are the fundamental physical limits to information storage and processing?  How does nature compute and communicate information?  And how does information shape social systems?” (emphasis added in all quotes).    Author Douglas L. Smith opens by wowing the reader with the complexity of a worm.  A tiny roundworm controls its development and biological systems in a manner that staggers the researchers with its precision and complexity.  Smith compares worm information processing to modern intelligently-designed automobiles.  A sedan can contain more than 35 million lines of code in its computers, he says; but that creates a problem for human designers – the cars are getting so complicated, “future development is actually getting stuck because they don’t know how to manage the software.”  Enter C. elegans for a little humility lesson:But Nature controls far more complex mechanisms with ease: Consider the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.  A lowly roundworm about the size of this comma, it grows from a single-celled egg to an adult containing exactly 959 cells.  The little fellas are clear as glass, and entire generations of lab students have spent countless hours hunched over microscopes tracking the career of each cell.  The whole process takes 24 rounds of cell division—79 of the 959 cells line the guts from mouth to anus, 302 become nerve cells, and 131 die along the way.  “Everything has been mapped precisely,” says [Jehoshua] Bruck [Moore Professor of Computational and Neural Systems and Electrical Engineering, and director of the IST], who has a framed poster of this developmental tree on his wall [the article contains this diagram].  “But we, as engineers, don’t understand how to handle all the information in that map.  We don’t understand what the principles are.”  But, somehow, the cells understand.  The egg divides, and one cell has to call heads and the other, tails.  The process involves the random diffusion of signaling molecules, but the result is very precise—you never end up with a two-headed worm.  Then the other divisions have to follow in the correct order.  “And even when every cell has a clock and the timetable,” Bruck points out, “they still need to coordinate their actions.  It’s like driving on the freeway—sometimes you need to slow down and let another car pass.”  Organisms are just information made flesh.Sidebars in the article provide the history of information theory, from George Boole’s binary algebra to Claude Shannon’s Boolean circuitry.  Information storage and processing, guidance and control of circuits dealing with vast amounts of information under constraints of time or bandwidth, are some of the technical challenges discussed in the article.  The overlap between biological and engineered systems throughout the article is almost seamless, except for the fact that biological systems are vastly superior to anything man has invented so far.  For example,But building complex machinery from molecule-sized parts is no cakewalk—how do you put all those tiny pieces in the right places?  Nature uses a program encoded in the genes.  Inspired by this, [two center members] are making DNA “tiles” that spontaneously assemble into complex patterns based on information contained in the DNA.Cells do amazing things with seemingly slap-dash components.  The body heals broken bones and fights off diseases, and we walk around and we do crossword puzzles, all with flimsy, floppy protein molecules packed into cells that keep dying.  There’s nothing magical about the stuff we’re made of, so clearly the miracles are in the circuits—broadly defined—that they’re organized into.  How do these circuits work?  And what else can be done with the same components? [p. 12]The goal of the Center for Biological Circuit Design (CBCD), says Paul Sternberg, Morgan Professor of Biology, investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and director of the center, “is to learn about biological circuits by trying to build them.”… There are actually three nested levels of circuitry, says Sternberg: networks of signaling molecules within a cell that handle such things as regulating metabolism or allowing an amoeba to find and engulf its prey; circuits consisting of several cells, such as the ones that coordinate our defense against infection; and the vast neuronal circuits that are responsible for, say, understanding speech.  The CBCD will initially tackle the first two, leaving the brain to the ganglion of neuroscientists on campus.By biological standards, the human brain is only middlingly complex–a protein molecule can have 10 thousand atoms, a cell can contain a billion macromolecules, and the heftier E&S reader might consist of 100 trillion cells.  That’s 27 orders of magnitude of organization from an atom to a person, which is like going from the diameter of an atom to the distance to Sirius [p. 12.  For a visualization, see Secret Worlds: The Universe Within.][Sidebar] A schematic of Arnold’s cellular band-pass filter.  The sender cell emits molecules of ALH… [He describes the complex interactions of seven parts in the cascade].  Got all that?  And this is a very simple regulatory scheme, as things go…. [p. 13].Says Sternberg, “…we’re just trying to get anything to work.”  It helps that the CBCD houses people who are building artificial circuits and people who are reverse engineering real ones.  “Now we say, ‘This cell has switchlike behavior—what mechanism is it using?’  It would be nice if you could say, ‘Well, there are four different ways that cells usually do that.’  It would be even better if you could say, ‘Well, there’s one way that they usually do it, let’s go test that one first.’” [p.13]“Everything we do in CNSE [Center for Neuromorphic Systems Engineering] is IST-related,” says director Pietro Perona, professor of electrical engineering.  “We take neurobiological principles and use them in engineered systems, and use engineering expertise to try to understand the brain.”The Information Age will be as monumental as was the Industrial Age in its effect on society.  Smith wraps things up whimsically:Says Bruck, “In time, I think ‘information’ will be a first-order concept.  So in 20 years, if a high-school student asks her friend, ‘Do you like algebra?’ the other girl will say, ‘Yes,’ or ‘No,’ or ‘Yes, but I hate the teacher.’  But the other day I asked my daughter, a high-school junior, ‘Do you like information?’ and she said, ‘What?!!’”1Douglas L. Smith, “TMI, Meet IST,” Engineering and Science (LXVIII:1/2), [summer] 2005, pp. 6-15.OK, Intelligent Design Movement, charge!  Grab this paper and wave it in the faces of the Darwin Party, and say, “Look!  The future is information, reverse engineering, and treating biological entities as intelligently designed circuitry.  That is what ID is all about.  This entire article had as much use for Darwinism as an astronaut for a pogo stick.  Biological systems could only be understood in terms of their information content, their logic, circuitry and programming—i.e., their design.  The design is so extraordinarily complex that Caltech’s brightest stars are at square one trying to figure it out.  Darwinism is an impediment, an 18th-century, Industrial Revolution paradigm that is not up to the requirements of the Information Age.  Step aside!  ID is the future.”    This article is one of many recent entries at the intersection of biology and nanotechnology that illustrates the power of a design-theoretic approach to science.  Although it does not mention intelligent design (and, undoubtedly, many of the participants are probably evolutionists), the content of the article plays right into the hands of the intelligent design movement.*  Look: a large interdisciplinary scientific enterprise (IST) has been organized with the goal to understand and capitalize on the information content in biology.  The same topics in this article are prevalent in the ID literature: information theory, reverse engineering, understanding and detecting design, programming, circuitry, complexity and communication.  The identity of the Designer, though an important and interesting subject,** did not enter into the discussion, and was not essential for achieving the goals of the IST.  This shows that ID is a non-religious scientific approach; it can bear fruit in a multicultural, secular setting.  Rather than bringing science to a halt, it promotes, stimulates and encourages scientific discovery—findings that will promise to revolutionize society, help cure disease, remove the drudgery of our lives and fulfill the promise of Daniel 12:4 that “many shall go to and fro, and knowledge shall increase.”  It’s past time to remove the ball and chain of Darwinian mythology and speed ahead into the Information Age—the golden age of intelligent design. (Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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SA looks to nuclear power

first_img2 May 2007The South African government is looking to increase its reliance on nuclear power generation as a means of ensuring energy security, diversifying the country’s current energy supply and reducing its greenhouse gas emissions.Addressing the Nuclear Energy and Uranium Renaissance Conference in Johannesburg in February, Minerals and Energy Minister Buyelwa Sonjica said there was a need to develop advanced, efficient, non-polluting, cost-effective energy technologies, especially for use in developing countries.“You are all aware that currently the South African electricity generation is dependent on coal. The over-reliance on coal will need to be reduced, particularly as investment is being made into new national electricity generation capacity,” Sonjica said.South Africa is to spend R97-billion to increase the capacity of its electricity grid over the next five years.In February, the government backed state-owned power utility Eskom in its plans to build a second nuclear power station in the southern part of the country, to contribute upwards of 1 000 megawatts of base-load power.The country is also busy experimenting with the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor concept, with a demonstration reactor set to be operational outside Cape Town by 2010.To prepare for an expanded nuclear programme, the Department of Minerals and Energy is putting together a strategy that will outline the future of nuclear energy in South Africa, while also ensuring investment in uranium beneficiation, given the presence of the mineral in the country.“[The] government is strongly encouraging the beneficiation of our minerals resources,” Sonjica said. “It goes without saying that beneficiation of uranium comes with its own responsibilities and sensitivities, and we should pursue this beneficiation within our national and international obligations.”‘Shift in mindset’According to Sonjica, developing a nuclear industry of such magnitude requires a shift in mindset from all role players in the local industry. South Africa would have to invest in nuclear research and development – currently being undertaken by the Nuclear Energy Corporation of SA (Necsa), as well as in manufacturing capacity.She said, however, that current rates of skills development were not sufficient, and that the government had to look into other methods, such as twinning local talent with international experts, to accelerate skills development.The department has since introduced initiatives such as the South African Young Nuclear Professionals Society and Women in Nuclear South Africa to promote the industry among previously disadvantaged people.Necsa chief executive Rob Adam told Engineering News that the corporation had been given R10-million a year for the next three years to establish a National Nuclear Manufacturing Centre.The centre will incorporate Necsa’s existing facilities at the Pelindaba complex outside Pretoria, including Fabritek (the manufacturing component of the old Atomic Energy Corporation), an existing design centre, and Necsa’s current fuel manufacturing activities at the Safari-1 research reactor.“What we have discovered is that South African companies are finding it hard to manufacture to nuclear specifications, and we fear that, when the building of new nuclear power stations starts, local companies will find it difficult to respond and money that we had hoped would be spent in South Africa will have to be spent abroad,” Adam told Engineering News.“This centre would both do its own manufacturing and help other South African companies to meet the required standards and be able to manufacture for nuclear.”Sonjica also called on the National Nuclear Regulator to strengthen its capacity to evaluate different technologies, adding that the state would also have to improve its system for ensuring compliance with its non-proliferation obligations.“Nuclear safety is going to be paramount in the pursuit of our objectives,” she said.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Learn the Real (Hard) Work of Residential Design

first_imgReflections on BuildingEnergy 2015NESEA Conference HighlightsOld Hippies Conspire to Save the WorldPearls of Wisdom From Recent ConferencesVideo: BuildingEnergy 2014: Stump the Energy NerdFrom Designed to Built: Delivering Your Green HomeIntegrated Design Reassessing Passive Solar Design PrinciplesSix Myths of Sustainable Design The other wanted a model home, a showcase of the possible, but with “turnkey” design that didn’t consume too much client time. One would be certified with PHIUS, using the newly minted WUFI Passive software, while the other pursued PHI certification with PHPP. But at their root, these projects shared a target, shared a climate, shared an architect. Chris will walk us through the process of each, and explain the whys of residential passive design in southern Maine.When architect Jesse Selman (C&H Architects in Amherst, Massachusetts) and builder Kent Hicks (Kent Hicks Construction in Chesterfield, Massachusetts) began a project together in Savoy, Massachusetts, it was simple enough: a deep energy retrofit of an existing home. The clients were committed to the property, owned a functioning house, and had decided to bring it up to modern standards for energy efficiency.What followed was anything but simple. It became a process spanning years, in which this team explored every branch of the residential decision tree. Would they keep the original house, or knock it down? Maybe they’d build on the same foundation, or use the old stone square as a garden plot? They explored factory-built and stick-framed new construction. With energy consultant Mike Duclos, of DEAP Energy Group, they pursued Passivhaus until the compromises in the view became too great, and they tested every material against the client’s extremely sensitive nose, which would not tolerate a chemical-laden environment. With a good-hearted client (the process can be unbearable without this saving grace), they pursued this ornate process to its elegantly simple end. High performance home designBuilder Mark Doughty (Thoughtforms) has made a living creating custom homes for others in the Greater Boston area, and when it came to creating a home for himself, he sought out engineer Jordan Goldman (Zero Energy Design). Together, they worked to design a high-performance home that, more than a year after completion, is producing more energy than it consumes. But what happened when Mark went back to business, creating homes to satisfy other people’s dreams?Architect Hank Keating (Trinity Development) works for a development company which focuses on urban neighborhoods, but he is not afraid of a challenge. He’d seen Passivhaus Consultant Mike Duclos (Deap Energy Group) present on Passivhaus, and brought him on when he started a Passive project of his own. The scope was large: one primary residence, one guest residence, an apartment for the interns, and a working farm. It’s not clear that he knew exactly what they were in for together, but Hank was undaunted by the process. With Mike as his guide through the thorns of PHPP, he had to come to grips with the consequences of design choices like large amounts of north-facing glass. They’ll talk together about the challenges and the compromises of an architect’s first foray into Passivhaus, and what they learned from the process. Residential retrofit in tricky situationsArchitect David Foley (Holland and Foley Architecture) and builder Paul Eldrenkamp (Byggmeister Design Build) ought to know better. Residential deep energy retrofit — bringing a home’s heating energy consumption down by 70% or more — are hard enough in normal circumstances. Doing renovations in historic districts are also notoriously fraught with perils, both financial and regulatory. Who in their right minds would combine the two?No one, including this team, who had been assured by code enforcement previously that the building was just outside the historic district. By the time the permitting process revealed that they’d be required to use all wood windows to comply with historic requirements, the project was already too developed to give up on. David and Paul will discuss the challenges, technical and otherwise, which faced this renovation of a 1928 Boston area home. The most expensive part of this project for David Foley himself? That it pushed him further along the road to net zero in his own thinking — and engendered a new round of renovations at his own home.His firm has been doing deep energy retrofits for years now, but when the tables turn, and it’s time for his own house renovation, architect Tom Hartman (C&H Architects) has to sell the idea to his wife and family, who would really rather plan a long family vacation. On a building he’s been working on and monitoring for more than a decade, Tom pushes through the (nearly) last round of retrofits at his 1911 Sears kit home: new siding and insulation to the outside, and a new heat pump for heating. He’ll walk through the calculations that got him there, the window details that saved his interior trim, the financial justifications, which finally earned him the green light, and the compromises we all make when it’s our own money on the line.I come to NESEA every year to hear stories like these — real people doing real, hard work, and coming back with real battle scars to tell the rest of us the results. I’m looking forward this winter to sitting back and listening to somebody else’s horror stories, and enjoying somebody else’s hard-earned successes. I hope you’ll join us this March 9 and 10, 2016 at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston for BuildingEnergy 16. RELATED ARTICLES center_img “When You Come To A Fork in the Road… Take It”Architect Chris Briley (a partner at Briburn in Portland, Maine) will share the stories of two projects, in parallel, with two clients, two sets of challenges, and two completed Passive Houses. One client didn’t want it to “look like a Passivhaus” and had a pretty strong idea of what it was like before the process even started — the kind of client who “just needs a little help with the floor plans.” I don’t sit in a hotel room in Boston for two days in the middle of winter, just to have someone tell me how everything worked out just as they planned. The truth is much more entertaining, a lot more flawed, and a lot more useful to me as a professional.Residential design is difficult work. With few exceptions, every client is an amateur. Every design is a testament to who the client thinks she ought to be. Every project is a wrestling match between the things he always wanted and the ones he can afford. The work is not easy.This year at the BuildingEnergy Boston conference in March, a collection of sessions will focus on the difficult parts of residential design, where no one will pretend it always goes perfectly. Let me tell you about them. Andrew Webster is a Certified Passive House Consultant at C&H Architects. This post originally appeared at the website of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association.last_img read more

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Video Essay: The Significance of the Shot-React-Shot Sequence

first_imgIn this video tutorial, find out why the Kuleshov effect just might be one of the most important aspects of successful filmmaking.In this video essay from No Film School, we get to explore why the Kuleshov effect can make or break your story. Or, to be more specific, your edit. The idea is simple; try to stay with me here — your shot must logically follow another shot. So, if one character is staring at something, show the audience what they’re staring at.Okay, I hope I didn’t lose you there. The reason why two shots juxtaposed like this is important is because understanding how an audience reads text is the very basis of filmmaking. What are they thinking while they’re looking at your images?The effect was named after Lev Kuleshov after he performed an experiment on how people react to certain types of editing. In the experiment, he showed a man staring down with a blank face, then he would cut to different items and people. Depending on what specifically he would cut to, the audience would have a different reaction. So even though the man’s facial expression wouldn’t change, the feeling would change simply because of what appeared immediately after.An important part of this experiment to consider is how filmmakers decide to tell stories. We have total control over how the audience is feeling, and this shot-react-shot style of storytelling is perhaps our greatest asset. (It’s also quite fascinating to know how the mind works in relation to images.) Image association is the heart of filmmaking, and this experiment is proof of that.Image via No Film School.You can apply this logic to many different areas of your film. For example, if two characters are locked in an embrace, a good way to add even more emotion or reaction to the scene is to show somebody else watching them. This gives your audience more information about the scene, amplifying their overall reaction. This is just a brief way to keep your audience engaged and interested in the story. When you’re drafting up your shot list or writing the screenplay, think of how the audience will see these scenes play out. Consider the reactions and emotions you want them to feel, and make sure you get those shots later.Here are a few ways you can play with your edit by using different types of cuts: Cover image via Universal Pictures.Looking for more articles on the film industry? Check these out.Industry Trends: The Most Popular Gear Rentals of 2018Going Full-Time vs. Working Freelance: Which Is Best for You?Stop Telling People to Shoot Their Film on an iPhoneIndustry Insights: The Ins and Outs of Real Estate Video ProductionFour Reasons You Should Be Renting Your Gear Out on ShareGrid,Cover image via Universal Pictures.Looking for more articles on the film industry? Check these out.Industry Trends: The Most Popular Gear Rentals of 2018Going Full-Time vs. Working Freelance: Which Is Best for You?Stop Telling People to Shoot Their Film on an iPhoneIndustry Insights: The Ins and Outs of Real Estate Video ProductionFour Reasons You Should Be Renting Your Gear Out on ShareGridlast_img read more

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Mohali Test: Zaheer, Ponting have a spat

first_imgIndian pacer Zaheer Khan and Australian skipper Ricky Ponting were locked in spat on the opening day of the first Test between the two countries in Mohali on Friday.Soon after Ponting was run out at 72 runs, he and Zaheer had an ugly exchange of words. It’s not clear who started it all, but Ponting seemed so upset with the words thrown at him by Zaheer that he went on to confront him.Ponting was also seen pointing his bat towards Zaheer. It took umpire Billy Bowden’s intervention to cool things down. Indian and Australian cricketers have a history of spats, including the infamous episode in which Harbhajan Singh allegedly called Andrew Symonds a “monkey”.last_img

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Scramble for Olympic tickets in Japan; rest of world waits

first_imgOrganizers extended the application period by 12 hours, citing high demand.Overseas residents will have to wait until June 15, when tickets can be put on sale by special distributors in each country — known as Authorized Ticket Resellers.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsOrganizers estimate 7.8 million tickets will be available, with 20-30% dedicated to sales outside Japan.This is the first phase of sales in Japan, with other chances available as the games get closer. Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Tokyo organizers say 50 percent of the tickets will sell for 8,000 yen ($70) or less, with the cheapest ticket costing 2,500 yen ($22).Organizers hope to generate about $800 million from ticket sales, a large source of revenue for the $5.6 billion privately funded operating budget. Overall, Japan will spend about $20 billion to prepare for the games, and about 70 percent is public money.Japan recently passed a law that bans selling tickets at above the original prices. Violators face fines of up to 1 million yen ($9,100), or a one-year jail term — or both.The International Olympic Committee was embarrassed in Rio de Janeiro when IOC member Patrick Hickey was arrested and charged with ticket scalping, which is also illegal in Brazil. He denied any wrongdoing.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Player of the Week: Ray Parks taking Blackwater to new heights Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Fans earlier this month complained to soccer governing body FIFA about buying tickets for next month’s Women’s World Cup in France, and then learning that friends and family were not given seats together.The same thing can happen buying Olympic tickets.CoSport says on its website that it cannot guarantee seats together.“While CoSport will make every effort to seat parties together, it is not possible to guarantee that all tickets for a given session and seating category will be seated together,” the company said.It also warns that tickets are sold by price category, not by exact seat location.Buyers outside Japan might get some deals if they are patient. It happened at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, and also at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang a year ago.Tokyo organizers will open sales globally in the spring of 2020, meaning any remaining, unsold tickets can be purchased at the prices offered in Japan. In Rio de Janeiro, many tickets were unsold as the games neared, and some desirable tickets were put back into the pool after they were sold but never paid for.Ticket prices in Japan vary greatly and are listed in the competition section on the organizers’ website.The opening ceremony on July 24 features the most expensive ticket — 300,000 yen ($2,680). The most expensive ticket for the closing ceremony is 220,000 yen ($1,965).The most expensive ticket for the men’s 100-meter final is 130,000 ($1,160), while the men’s basketball final goes for 108,000 yen ($970). DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew FILE – In this June 20, 2016, file photo, a man handles the Olympic tickets he just purchased at a shopping mall in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Tokyo Olympic organizers say millions of Japan residents have shown interest in buying tickets for next year’s games. Organizers closed the first phase of ticket applications on Wednesday, May 29, 2019, for Japan residents, and applicants will be told on June 20 what tickets they have been allocated through a lottery system.(AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)TOKYO — The scramble is underway by residents of Japan to land tickets for next year’s Tokyo Olympics. It begins for the rest of the world in a few weeks.Tokyo Olympic organizers said millions had shown interest by Wednesday when the first phase of ticketing closed for Japan residents. Applicants will learn on June 20 what tickets they were allocated in a lottery system.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Tokyo Organizers on Wednesday declined to say how many tickets had been applied for through the on-line system. They say only that 7.5 million “ID registrations” have been recorded, which allowed people to apply and enter the lottery.“Tokyo 2020 is not disclosing additional details at this stage,” organizers said in a statement.Buying tickets in Japan is not cheap. But it’s more expensive outside Japan where the resellers — appointed by each national Olympic Committee — can add a 20% percent “handling fee” to the cost of each ticket.In addition, many tickets are packaged by resellers with top hotels and other perks, and the markups can be more than 20%. Many of these packages are aimed at corporate buyers, for whom price is not always a concern. The resellers also run the risk of getting stuck with tickets they can’t sell.The reseller for the United States is CoSport , which also handles sales in Australia, Jordan and several European countries.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport View commentslast_img read more

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Thursday will be Day 8 of LacMegantic jury deliberations

first_imgSHERBROOKE, Que. – Jurors in the Lac-Megantic criminal negligence trial have completed Day 7 of their deliberations without reaching a verdict.Unlike Tuesday, when they emerged with a letter telling the judge they were at an impasse, the jurors did not surface Wednesday.The eight men and four women are deciding the fate of Tom Harding, Richard Labrie and Jean Demaitre.The three are charged in connection with the July 2013 tragedy in which 47 people were killed when a runaway train carrying crude oil derailed and exploded.All three accused can be found guilty of criminal negligence causing the death of 47 people, while jurors have the option of convicting Harding on one of two other charges: dangerous operation of railway equipment or dangerous operation of railway equipment causing death.last_img read more

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Residents get to sound off on plans for Wheeland Pond

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:town meeting, wheeland pond Wheeland Residents give ‘pond development’ thumbs up Wheeland Pond gets make overcenter_img Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 26 Feb 2015 – You will also get a history lesson on what the Wheeland community and its pond means to the Turks and Caicos as the National Trust and DEMA team up for two town meetings to determine what can be done to preserve and rescue the pond. Winema Sanders is the Public Awareness & Education Officer with the TC National Trust; she was on site to encourage residents of Blue Hills and others to attend either a town meeting at 6pm tonight, Thursday or on Saturday morning at 10am. “It’s vital that we preserve an area like this for future generations and that is what the National Trust goal is, that is what the goal of DEMA is as well. We want to make sure that the land here and the community knows the essential needs of the area and that we are able to be good stewards of our environment and take ownership in that. That is why it is so important to have these community meetings so that they are able to speak to us and we’re able to have some type of dialogue so that we are able to envision their community being like, versus us just telling them what their community is supposed to be…”The 90 minute meetings will be held at the Wheeland Pond to discuss a way to preserve and enhance the heritage site. last_img read more

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