Sheffield named chief development officer at Art Museums

first_imgThe Harvard Art Museums are pleased to announce the appointment of Melanie Sheffield as chief development officer, a new leadership position in the museums’ Office of Institutional Advancement; she will assume the role on March 4, 2019. The chief development officer will provide strategic direction for the planning and execution of all functions related to development, in alignment with the museums’ mission, vision, and goals. Sheffield comes to the museums from Boston Ballet, where she has served since 2013, first as director of individual giving and then as director of development, a promotion she received during her first year with the organization. She is returning to the museums for this new role, having previously served as assistant director of membership and special programs in 2005–06.With over 17 years of fundraising and development experience in cultural and higher education institutions, Sheffield brings a wealth of knowledge and insight to her new role at the museums. She has a deep understanding of the philanthropic landscape in Boston and beyond, and has worked with some of the region’s foremost donors. She established Boston Ballet’s first planned giving program and is personally responsible for a portfolio of 50 of the ballet’s top prospects and donors.“We are extraordinarily fortunate to welcome someone of Melanie’s caliber to our team at the Harvard Art Museums,” said Martha Tedeschi, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director. “She is perfectly positioned to build on the success we have had in generating enthusiasm and support for our unique teaching and research mission. Her passion for the arts is palpable and inspiring; I look forward to her energy and ideas as we forge new paths in stewarding our fundraising efforts, strengthening relationships with current friends, and reaching out to bring others into our network of supporters.”Prior to her work at Boston Ballet, Sheffield served in development leadership roles at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (2010–13: director of advancement; director of the president’s council) and Wentworth Institute of Technology (2006–10: interim vice president of institutional advancement; major gifts officer; director of the annual fund and donor relations). Sheffield earned a B.A. in communications from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1999, with a minor in history of art and architecture.“I am thrilled to be returning to the Harvard Art Museums as the new chief development officer and to partner with Director Martha Tedeschi in advancing the museums’ exceptional mission,” said Sheffield. “As an ardent supporter of the arts, it is an honor to join this community and to have the opportunity to engage current friends and create new connections with those interested in investing in the museums’ vibrant future.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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APG and others outline stance on BP net-zero ambition, delivery

first_imgIn their statement, the investors said they welcomed this as a response to last year’s Climate Action 100+ shareholder resolution, and also expressed their support for BP’s reporting on the consistency of new material capital expenditure investments with the goals of the Paris Agreement, in line with the 2019 AGM resolution.‘Ground-breaking’ According to the investors, this reporting “breaks new ground by developing by developing a profitability and carbon intensity test for projects under conditions which BP believes are consistent with the Paris goals”.They cautioned that the assumptions underlying this test should be kept under careful review “given the possibility that the COVID crisis may have brought forward peak oil”.“We also look to forward to building on our constructive engagement in this area, exploring how to ensure that capex is also consistent with carbon budgets aligned to BP’s journey to net-zero,” they added.The investors also said they would “welcome more clarity” on BP’s short and medium-term targets aligned to its net-zero ambition, such as greenhouse gas emissions targets for energy produced and sold (Scopes 1-3), the links to remuneration, and planned levels of investment in traditional oil and gas and low carbon technologies.“Providing a roadmap and aligning capital expenditure with a finite carbon budget are clear indicators to investors of a shift in company strategy”Steve Waygood, chief responsible investment officer at Aviva Investors“We commend BP for setting out its net-zero ambition,” said Steve Waygood, chief responsible investment officer at Aviva Investors.“Providing a roadmap and aligning capital expenditure with a finite carbon budget are clear indicators to investors of a shift in company strategy, providing milestones against which to assess progress. We look forward to continuing our engagement with BP to ensure that capex remains consistent with its goal to reach net-zero by 2050.”*Full list of supporting investors: APG Asset Management, Aviva Investors, AXA Investment Managers, BMO Global Asset Management on behalf of its advisory clients, EOS at Federated Hermes on behalf of its stewardship clients, HSBC Global Asset Management, Kempen, Legal & General Investment Management, Local Authority Pension Fund Forum, M&G Investments, Newton Investment Management, PGGM, and UBS Asset Management.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here. Major global institutional investors involved in collaborative engagement with BP as part of Climate Action 100+ (CA 100+) have publicly set out their perspective on the company’s commitment to become a net-zero oil and gas major, welcoming “ground-breaking” reporting on capital expenditure but pledging further attention to the company’s spending.APG Asset Management, Aviva Investors, Legal & General Investment Management, PGGM and UBS Asset Management are among those* putting their name to statement that has been drafted “for consideration” upon the occasion of BP’s annual general meeting tomorrow.Due to the coronavirus and government guidance on social distancing, the AGM will be a closed meeting and will be live streamed on the Internet. Investors will not be able to participate, but chair Helge Lund is expected to acknowledge the investors’ statement when he addresses the meeting.The investors’ statement follows BP in February announcing a net-zero “ambition”, with then new chief executive officer Bernard Looney saying it would provide details about how it planned to deliver on that in September, when it holds a capital markets day.last_img read more

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DSS Says Longevity Weighing on Social Security Fund

first_img Sharing is caring! 149 Views   no discussions Share Tweet Deputy Director of the Dominica Social Security, Mr. Augustus EtienneDominica has been praised for providing the perfect environment for longevity with the island boasting at least a dozen centenarians the oldest having died at 128.While that is great news for those who wish to live long healthy lives, it’s not so great for the Dominica Social Security.The administrators are saying that Dominica’s aging population has been drawing heavily from its resources.Speaking on Vibes Radio, Deputy Director of the Social Security, Augustus Etienne revealed that an actuary- someone who deals with the measurement and management of risk and uncertainty -has put into perspective what that means for the social security fund.He explained, “More and more people are coming of age to receive their pensions and when they get there, they live long. It is not uncommon to find persons in receipt of pensions from age 60 and they are 100+ and they have to continue getting for as long as they live. People are aging much better now.”Etienne adds, “A person lives to retirement and then 10, 20, 30 years after retirement before they pass.”He says a population that is aging well means that the DSS has to take into consideration several factors that will impact the fund’s sustainability including the age profile of the population, those approaching 60.“When you start paying someone a pension at 60, how long do we have to pay them before they pass, how long do we have to pay commitments to their dependents…”He gave this as reason for the decision to increase the pensionable age from 60 to 65.The age has been gradually increasing by six months for years. This year it settles at 65.center_img LifestyleLocalNews DSS Says Longevity Weighing on Social Security Fund by: – February 3, 2020 Share Sharelast_img read more

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