VIDEO: 3 Workers Missing after Pemex Oil Rig Fire

first_imgzoom Three workers are still unaccounted for after the explosion and subsequent fire on Pemex-owned Abkatun Permanente oil processing platform situated in the Gulf of Mexico.Two of the missing workers were employed by Cotemar, a Mexican oil services company whereas the remaining one was working for Pemex.Four people were killed and 45 injured in the fire that followed a massive explosion on Wednesday on the platform situated in the Campeche Sound.The deceased have been identified as three Cotemar’s employees and one of Pemex.Pemex added that three of seven workers admitted to the General Hospital in Ciudad del Carmen have been discharged. Two of the 45 injured platform workers are reported to be in serious condition.The company further added that the fire did not cause an oil spill at sea. As informed only a runoff of hydrocarbon has been released which is being contained by specialized vessels.The company’s officials stated that it was possible to avoid the spill as feeder lines could be turned off on the porcessing platform which would not be the case at an active oil well.According to Pemex Director General Emilio Lozoya, the fire would have a minimal impact on production, as production from nearby wells could be rerouted to other processing platforms thus meeting the customers’ needs.Lozoya said the explosion appeared to have been set off by some kind of mechanical problem, however; he added that the cause was being investigated.The massive fire was extinguished late Wednesday by 10 firefighting and emergency boats.Mexican oil giant denied claims that the Abkatun Permanente platform had collapsed, saying that it still stands on its feet.Loading at the Caryo Arcas Terminal is suspended until further notice, following the fire on at the Abkatun Permanente production platform.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Docs strike Healthcare services severely affected across country

first_imgNew Delhi: Healthcare services were severely affected across the country on Monday as doctors wearing helmets and forming human chains went on a strike in solidarity with their protesting colleagues in West Bengal.A large number of patients and their relatives, caught unaware of the strike, were seen waiting outside various hospitals, appealing to authorities for help. The Indian Medical Association (IMA) has given the nationwide call to withdraw non-emergency healthcare services after junior doctors in West Bengal went on a strike against a brutal attack on their colleagues by the relatives of a patient who died during treatment. Also Read – Cong may promise farm loan waiver in HaryanaIn many government and private hospitals across the country, out-patient departments (OPD) remained closed and scheduled surgeries were postponed. However, emergency services remained operational. “Those patients or their relatives who take the law into their hands should be strictly dealt with. While we understand the pain of the doctors, is it justified that patients who travel hundreds of kilometres to get treatment at the PGI suffer like this?” asked an elderly patient visiting the OPD at the PGIMER in Chandigarh. Also Read – Modi formed OBC commission which earlier govts didn’t do: ShahOutside a government hospital in Thiruvananthapuram, a patient said, “We left our homes at 3 am and do not know if the doctors will attend to us.” The protesting doctors are demanding a comprehensive central legislation to check violence against doctors and other medical professionals at hospitals. They also urged the West Bengal governments to fulfil the demands of the striking doctors and resolve the matter amicably at the earliest. In the national capital, doctors at government and a few private hospitals boycotted work and staged protests. Doctors at the premier All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), who had earlier decided not to strike, too joined the stir after a doctor was allegedly manhandled by a patient’s attendants. Members of several resident doctors associations also took out marches on their campuses to lodge protest. Many patients were aware of the stir on Monday which comes after scores of doctors in Delhi had boycotted work and held demonstrations on Friday and Saturday, but many still turned up at the facilities only to be turned away or wait for long hours. More than 40,000 doctors in Maharashtra boycotted work, according to an IMA official. In Goa too, medicos observed the strike and took out a ‘silent protest march’ to condemn the attack on some of their colleagues in West Bengal. Similar reports came in from other states, including Assam, Bihar, Jharkhand, Odisha, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Kerala. In Kerala, long queues near OPDs were seen in several government hospitals in the early hours of the day. Some patients said they didn’t know of the strike and have been waiting for hours. A woman in the state capital said she had come with her relative who had breathing problems early this morning and no doctors had attended to her till 10 am. The strike had a telling effect on medical services as people struggled to get treatment in private hospitals in Karnataka. However, government hospitals remained open following a circular by the Commissioner of Health and Family Welfare and there was a huge rush of patients at these facilities since morning. A middle-aged man, who accompanied his ailing wife to a hospital in Hisar, Haryana, said, “Why should patients have to suffer like this? I have been waiting here for hours, but no one is giving any proper response. The central government must intervene in the matter as patients across the country should not be made to suffer.” In Tamil Nadu, doctors, including postgraduate students, formed human chains in front of state-run medical college and hospitals in Chennai. Wearing black badges and sporting helmets, they held placards seeking protection. Similar protests were also held in government hospitals in other parts of Tamil Nadu. The IMA had launched a four-day nationwide protest from Friday over the Kolkata incident and wrote to Union Home Minister Amit Shah demanding enactment of a central law to check violence against healthcare workers.last_img read more

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Discounted movie subscription service MoviePass shuts down

NEW YORK — MoviePass, the movie ticket subscription service that allowed subscribers to buy up to three movie tickets per month for a small fee, shut down Saturday.Its future is unclear.Helios and Matheson Analytics, the parent company of MoviePass, said Friday in a release that it was interrupting service for all its subscribers because its efforts to seek financing have not been successful.It says it’s “unable to predict if or when” MoviePass will continue. The company says it’s planning to study all options including the sale of the company in its entirety.MoviePass drew in millions of subscribers, initially luring them with a $10 monthly rate. But that proved unsustainable. Because MoviePass typically pays theatres the full cost of tickets — $15 or more in big cities — a single movie can put the service in the red. The company was forced to make changes. Those efforts, however, never stopped the losses.In a letter posted to subscribers on its website, Mitch Lowe, CEO of MoviePass, wrote,” In August 2017, MoviePass began a transformation of the movie going industry by introducing its low monthly price subscription service. Since then, others in the industry have followed our lead. “MoviePass said it will be providing subscribers with “appropriate” refunds for their period of service already paid for. Subscribers will not need to request a refund or contact MoviePass customer service to receive a refund. Subscribers will not be charged during the service interruption, according to the website.Helios acquired a majority stake in the subscription service in 2017.The Associated Press read more

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Now Emma you know enough to bring me down an Irish aides

first_imgAN IRISHWOMAN who formerly worked for the cycling team of Lance Armstrong has revealed that the team flushed $25,000 of doping down a toilet, and then dumped its contents in a field, during the 1998 Tour de France which began in Ireland.Emma O’Reilly worked as a ‘soigneur’ – an assistant responsible for arranging cyclists’ food, clothing, transport as well as administering massages – for the US Postal Service (USPS) team between 1996 and 2000.Her affidavit to the US Anti-Doping Agency – reported on by the Irish Times this morning – reveals frustrations among some of the team’s riders in 1997 (not including Armstrong at the time).The team’s riders believed their then-doctor was not supplying them with enough legitimate recovery products to help them recover from particularly tough events.However, she remembers “being aware that some riders on the team were on doping programs in 1997″, adding: “Everyone knew what was happening but I never had a conversation with with a rider in which the doping program was openly discussed”. I remember saying to one of the other staff members that $25,000 worth of doping products probably does not make very good fertiliser, and that the team should come back to the field in a few years to check out the grass.The affidavit reveals, however, that a single Thermos flask was overlooked during this dump and was kept in a fridge for the remainder of the Tour. When O’Reilly shook this flask, she “could hear vials rattling inside of it”. When she finally mentioned it to another member of staff the following month, during a separate tour, that person’s face “went pale”. The following day the Thermos had been removed.Celaya stepped down as team doctor at the end of that season, moving to the ONCE team. He was played by Luis Garcia del Moral.The affidavit continues, and sees O’Reilly recall being asked by Lance Armstrong to dump a package which he did not want to dispose of at his team hotel.“From Lance’s explanation and the shape and feel of the package I assumed that the package contained syringes that had been used by Lance during the Tour of the Netherlands,” an event that had just concluded.“If they had been used to administer legitimate recovery products then there is no reason they could not have been disposed of by a doctor or trainer at the team hotel.”A promotion – on one condition – and a cross-border journeyThe following year O’Reilly was made head soigneur, a position she accepted on the explicit condition that “it would not require me to become involved in the team’s doping program.” This was an accepted condition of her promotion.That May, during a pre-season training session in the French Pyrenees, Armstrong asked O’Reilly to drive to the team base in Valencia, Spain “to collect something from the team doctor”. He requested that O’Reilly’s then-boyfriend not be told about the purpose of her trip, though she told him anyway.They stayed in one of two houses in the suburb of Piles which were rented by USPS. While she was there, packing things for the team, team director Johan Bruynell came to the house and “discretely [sic] handed me a small pill bottle” containing “about twenty small white tablets”.These were brought back across the French border without incident, and was dropped off to Armstrong in a McDonald’s car park in Nice.When Lance reached my vehicle I discretely handed him the pill bottle so that Kristin or anybody else who happened to be observing our interaction would not be able to tell that a handoff that occurred. […]To this day, Lance and I have never discussed the trip to Spain, the pills, or what the pills were for. Armstrong won his first Tour de France that month. It was the first of Armstrong’s seven consecutive victories on Le Tour.That season saw O’Reilly’s relationship with team director Bruynell break down, and she only worked on the events in the 2000 season where Bruynell was absent – meaning she missed the 2000 Tour de France and other major events.She quit USPS entirely at the end of the 2000 season, and has not worked in cycling since then. She is now a self-employed massage therapist based in Manchester, England.Read:  Lance Armstrong case: Ally admits dopingPlus: What next for Armstrong after devastating report? I did not discuss the doping programme with any of the staff members during the 1997 season, but in April of that year I did observe [an unnamed doctor] as he prepared syringes that were to be administered to the riders during the Circuit de la Sarthe [an early-season short race in France].I recall that [the doctor] used a syringe to pull a substance out of a glass vial but do not remember the name or appearance of the substance because I had made a deliberate choice to avoid all conversations about, and involvement with, the doping activities on the team.center_img A month later, during a race in France, O’Reilly was giving Armstrong a massage when he mentioned having a low level of hematocrit (the volume of red blood cells in the blood). This would be problematic because red blood cells are necessary to carry oxygen around the body.When I asked him what he was going to do about his low hematocrit, Lance just laughed and said, “You know, Emma. What everybody does.” I understood Lance’s response to mean that he intended to use EPO in order to raise his hematocrit levels.A syringe, a bruise, a positive test, and a ‘saddle sore’Three weeks later, and just days before the start of that year’s Tour de France, Armstrong asked O’Reilly if he could borrow her makeup to cover a bruise in his left arm. He said this bruise had been caused by a syringe. O’Reilly would not let him use her own make-up, but bought a variety of concealers for him to use.The ruse worked – the bruising was not spotted by doctors doing a pre-Tour medical exam.A few days later, Armstrong tested positive for a corticosteroid. There was “no sense of panic” about this on the part of the USPS team until they received word that reporters from the French newspaper Le Monde were going to break the story.O’Reilly was giving Armstrong a massage when he was talking to two unnamed others and came up with an explanation for a positive sample. They agreed to claim that Armstrong was suffering from saddle sores and needed a corticosteroid cream for this.The affidavit says a backdated prescription was needed for this story, and one was obtained from Dr del Moral, the new team doctor.It was clear to me after the meeting that Lance’s positive sample was not caused by the medical treatment of a saddle sore, and that the only reason he obtained a prescription was to excuse his improper use of a prohibited substance.Lance acknowledged that I had been present for a significant moment in his cycling career when he told me, “Now, Emma, you enough to bring me down.” That season, she recalled, was the first time USPS had entered the Tour de France. All nine of its riders completed the tour, with one mechanic from another team telling O’Reilly: “You’ve got a good doctor”. The implication, she says, was that the doctor was not only supplying recovery products but banned performance enhancers.Lance joins USPS as Le Tour comes to DublinThe following year, 1998, was when Lance Armstrong signed for USPS – making his comeback in professional cycling shortly after beating cancer that had spread to his brain, lungs, abdomen and testicles.It was also the year in which the Tour de France included two stages in Dublin, and a road stage between Enniscorthy and Cork. The Tour began in Dublin on July 11, though Armstrong – who was only beginning his comeback after his battle with cancer – did not participate in that year’s Tour.One or two months previously, US cyclist George Hincapie – a member of the team – learned that O’Reilly was travelling to Belgium and asked her to pick up a package from another unnamed individual.Upon collection she was told the package included testosterone – which “gives a rider enough energy to finish a sprint” – and that there were other prohibited substances used to regulate a cyclist’s temperature during a race.She then travelled back to Ireland, and made arrangements to meet the USPS team when they arrived on a ferry from Belgium ahead of the beginning of the Tour de France.The ferry was scheduled to arrive at the port after midnight, so I was surprised when customs agents showed up to meet the ferry to carry out searches of the team’s vehicles. I convinced the customs agents to leave by explaining that they would have a riot on their hands if they tried to search the trucks at 2:00am and that any search they felt was necessary could just as easily occur in the morning.That morning word got out that Festina rider Willy Voet had been arrested while trying to carry doping products in to France from Belgium. That arrest prompted major public outcry, many police raids, and ultimately led to so many doping accusations that the 1998 Tour has since been referred to as the ‘Tour du Dopage’.O’Reilly reported that the team doctor, Dr Pedro Celaya, was “frantic” about these developments, and remained so until the decision was taken to dump the team’s entire stock of doping products after the second time trial. By this stage the tour had left Ireland.‘Doping products probably don’t make good fertiliser’By this time a USPS camper van was parked in a large field close to the course at Meyrignac-l’Église, where the second time trial stage was beginning.[An unnamed woman] who was working as a host for the US Postal Service team told me that $25,000 worth of doping products were flushed down the toilet of the team bus, and discharged into the field.[The woman’s partner, a team mechanic,] told her that Dr Celaya was terrified and wanted all of the doping products to be removed from the bus in case it was searched by the French police.last_img read more

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