MVMT Watches prove you can have sleek style with petty pricing

first_img The Absolute Worst Movies to Watch with a Date The Best Food Shows on Netflix to Binge Right Now 2. White/Silver 3. Rose Gold/Brown Leather 4. Chorine White/Caramel Leather 5. Black/Black Tattoo Ideas for Men (For When You Have No Idea) There’s a common misconception among consumers that premium construction always demands premium pricing to match. As a buyer, we often get caught thinking the best-looking wears — in this case, watches — require us to shell out half our rent check just to strap a timepiece worth looking at on our wrist. Fortunately, MVMT Watches (pronounced “movement”) is a brand that’s living up to its name, pushing high-quality builds without the luxury price tag that often comes with premium brands.Related: The Strata-focused Layer Leather brings the stadium to your wristAs Indiegogo’s second-highest crowdfunded fashion start up, MVMT Watches has knack for building something out of nothing. Young entrepreneur Jake Kassan grew up fretting over the price accompanying big-name watch brands, so him and his buddy decided to start their own out of San Diego once out of college. The company’s first, six-piece collection of watches is the perfect example of their modern-day ode to minimalism, too, offering a variety of 42-millimeter cases with 24-millimeter bands.Dubbed the Classic Series, the inaugural collection of timepieces provide a swath of distinct styles to choose from. Each utilizes scratch-resistant mineral crystal for ample protection, regardless of whether you opt for a watch donning the leather or a stainless steel band, with Miyota Japanese quartz movement for power and stainless steel steel buckle to ensure it stays on your wrist. Highlights such as the White/Silver ($100) and Black/Tan Leather ($95) represent an amalgam of both form and function, one you can quickly throw on under a blazer for a professional look or with a basic t-shirt if you prefer a more casual approach.The Classic Series was only the beginning, though. MVMT Watches quickly introduced the Chrono Series soon after, which takes a subtle cue from early aviation’s fascination with precise timekeeping and meshes it with an impressive air of contemporary touches. Watches like the Chrono White/Caramel Leather ($135) and the like-minded Chrono All Black ($140) exemplify the style, sporting water-resistant construction and three sub dials featuring a 60-second timer, 30-minute timer, and a 24-hour hand. The 40 series soon followed in suit, bringing with it slimmer offerings and premium, interchangeable straps that look as phenomenal on the Rose Gold/Natural Leather ($120) as the Silver/Brown Leather ($120).Apparently, sometimes you get more than you pay for.center_img Editors’ Recommendations 14 Scandinavian Clothing Brands You Need to Know 10 Best Crime Documentaries on Netflix Right Now last_img read more

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Iraq needs support to leave violent past behind says UN envoy as

With this in mind, Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert said it was necessary to spotlight the scourge of corruption, which she described as being “pervasive at all levels in Iraq … taking money that should be spent on public services [and] placing it instead in private pockets”, deterring economic activity and hindering business development, which would result in much-needed job creation.  “Achieving tangible results [in wiping out corruption] will be crucial, in so many ways, most importantly it will revive public trust which is essential for the further development of Iraq’s democracy,” she stated. Moreover, Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert stressed that Iraq can only achieve its full potential with the active political, social and economic participation of women and youth. While UNAMI had recently organized and participated in a variety “meaningful” of women and youth events throughout the country, she “warned against change as mere window dressing. At the end of the day, it is all about translating excellent intentions into positive action.” According to the UNAMI chief, although Baghdad is “opening up”, the security situation will continue to require close monitoring, “not only in Baghdad, but throughout the country. Attacks continue, as seen with recent blasts and suicide bombings. Also very relevant: the [Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL] threat is still out there.” She called for continued, wide-based international support, support to ensure that Iraq leaves its violent past behind, and to ensure that the country does not slip back into the turmoil from which it so recently emerged. “In other words: to prevent ISIL from regaining a strong foothold in Iraq a long-term approach is critical,” she stressed. Among the dominant security concerns she raised were returning ISIL-fighters from Syria to Iraq, along with their families, and the issue of armed actors operating outside State control, engaged in illegal or criminal activities and exerting economic and social influence throughout the country.  “Clearly, the activities of these actors undermine state authority, they affect vulnerable communities, they weaken the national economy and sadly, they also prevent the peaceful return of displaced persons,” noted Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert, and while she welcomed certain actions, such as the closing down of so-called illegal economic offices, she warned that “the road will certainly be long.” It would therefore prove crucial to hold to account all armed actors involved in criminal enterprise or illegal activity. Ahead of today’s meeting, the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution in which it decided to extend the mandate of UNAMI until 31 May 2020. By that action, the Mission is, among other duties, to give priority to providing advice, support and assistance to the Government and people of Iraq “to promote inclusive political dialogue and reconciliation at the national and local levels”. In a briefing to the Security Council, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Head of the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI), described the country’s challenges as “manifold”, but pledged the operation’s “continued and strong commitment to assist and support wherever we can.”  She urged the Council to recognize that the ongoing political infighting is a costly obstacle, and a full year after national elections, ministerial appointments have yet to be made to the key posts, including Interior, Defence, Justice and Education.  “Political parties have not yet shown themselves willing to compromise. It should be understood, however, that political compromise is not a sign of weakness. In fact, it is a sign of political maturity – and a requisite for resilience.” Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert said, also adding that with critical laws pending, it was “high time” for chairs and deputies to be selected for parliamentary committees. She went on to say that it was no secret that the Iraqi authorities, institutions, mechanisms and systems continued to struggle with deep rooted problems, often hampering swift and robust responses from the Government to pressing needs, such as reconstruction, development and security.  “These problems can be schematized, as a range of individual interests and arguments, many of which arise from long-standing grievances and differences between communities, between political entities, between the federal and the Kurdistan Regional Government,” she said, warning that this could become entrenched in the form of concealed, private networks of power, “operating independently and pursuing narrow objectives and goals.”   read more

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