Spotted Quoll mining contract bagged by Barminco

first_imgMining contractor Barminco continues to drive growth in its domestic market with the award of a three year, A$60million underground mining services contract for Western Areas’ Spotted Quoll nickel mine located 5 km from the Flying Fox underground complex and 80 km east of Hyden in Western Australia. Western Areas NL announced the decision to mine the Spotted Quoll underground mine in December 2010. The estimated mine life for Stage One of the underground mine is eight years.Barminco CEO Neil Warburton said decline development was scheduled to start mid April, with first ore production expected in February 2012. The three year Spotted Quoll contract (with two one year extension options) encompasses all underground mine operating activities including development and production, and complements Barminco’s existing contract with Western Areas at the Flying Fox mine.“We are very pleased to be extending our relationship with Western Areas and look forward to cooperating in realising operating synergies across both sites and delivering industry best safety and productivity performance,” Mr Warburton said. “Barminco is a leader in the underground mining services industry and we have a genuine commitment to delivering the highest standards to this project, and indeed across all projects. Winning the Spotted Quoll contract with such a high calibre client supports our commitment to maintaining a high performing domestic business which underpins our growth both domestically and internationally.”Barminco has also boosted the capabilities of its African subsidiary African Underground Mining Services (AUMS). It took delivery of two Atlas Copco MT6020 trucks for its work at Kinross Gold’s Akwaaba Deeps gold mine in Ghana. The two 60 t load trucks are predicted to increase the contractor’s haulage capacity by close to 20% over the existing fleet.last_img read more

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Herpes infected humans before we had even evolved into humans

first_imgIT IS THE insidious and irritating virus which can causes cold sores on mouths and painful blisters on genitals.And now, scientists say that there really was no escaping from the herpes virus: in fact, it infected humans before they had even become human.Researchers in California found that one strand of herpes jumped from ancient chimpanzees to homo erectus, the ancestors of modern humans, around 1.6 million years ago.The other strand infected hominids before they split from chimpanzees 6 million years ago, more than four million years before that.“Understanding where our viruses come from will help guide us in preventing future viruses from making the jump into humans,” said Dr Joel O Wertheim, the lead author of the study and an assistant research scientist at the University of California.It has been estimated that around two-thirds of the human population is infected with at least one herpes simplex virus, which usually appears as cold sores on the lips, or blisters on the genitals.“Humans are the only primates we know of that have two herpes simplex viruses,” said Wertheim. “We wanted to determine why”.The researchers compared the gene sequences of the herpes viruses to the family tree of other viruses from eight monkey and ape species, and were able to determine when and how the virusus evolved.“Comparing virus gene sequences gave us insight into viral pathogens that have been infecting us since before we were humans,” said Wertheim.The findings are published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.Read: People who say ‘you know’ and ‘like’ are, like, surprisingly thoughtful > Read: Trinity College astrophysicists want you to play ‘Hot or Not’ with sunspots >last_img read more

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