Brett Lee wants more conducive pitches for fast bowlers in India

first_img Press Trust of India MumbaiApril 17, 2019UPDATED: April 17, 2019 17:10 IST Lee agreed that pitches have become better in India but still, more needs to be done to make them suitable for fast bowlers (PTI photo)HIGHLIGHTSBrett Lee wants Indian cricket pitches to be made more suitable for fast bowlersLee has played 76 Tests and 221 ODIs, not counting the upcoming World CupHe also agreed that pitches for pacers have already improved since three years agoFormer Australia speedster Brett Lee on Wednesday urged that pitches in India should be made more conducive for fast bowlers to make the contest an even one and help the country keep producing pacers.Lee, who played 76 Tests and 221 ODIs, without naming the upcoming ICC Cricket World Cup, also said that India has a good chance to do well in the mega event starting May 30.”I urge the ground staff to prepare wickets that are a bit more conducive to fast bowling. I want to see a wicket with a little bit more in it (for the pacers), thoda thoda grass (little little grass), to make the bowlers smart and to give them the opportunity to bowl fast,” Lee told reporters here.The 42-year-old former pacer was present at an event to announce a Mumbai-specific tie-up between the real estate developers Runwal Group and Cricket Australia.”What happens if you are 17 years of age and playing a four-day match – Ranji Trophy – it’s really hot and you are bowling on a wicket with no grass and it’s flat and you are trying to bowl a 145K, dehydrated.”You have lost 7 litres of a fluid a day and you are flying in and you are losing all your energy, and then you have got a guy at the other end (a spinner) coming down taking five wickets because the wicket spins massively. What’s the incentive for this guy (pacer) to run in everyday? So we need to create the incentive,” he explained.advertisementThe former pacer, who took 310 Test wickets, at the same time conceded that the wickets for pacers have improved and cited the examples of Mumbai and Mohali.”If India want to keep creating good fast bowlers, then they need to make sure (that there are) wickets to compensate for that. Mohali normally gets through. I think that the wicket here (in Mumbai) is good now.”I reckon the wickets are getting better. If you had asked me this question three years ago, the wickets had been shocking. Now the wickets are giving a little more for the bowlers.”I am not saying I want a green top which flies through, but something for the (fast) bowlers to make it an even contest,” he explained.Also Read | IPL 2019: KL Rahul, R Ashwin shine as KXIP beat RR to move into top-4Also Read | Losing wickets in clumps cost us: RR captain Ajinkya Rahane after KXIP lossAlso Read | 7 first-timers, 2 World Cup-winners in India’s World Cup 2019 squadAlso Watch | India name 15-man squad for 2019 Cricket World CupFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byRoshni Tags :Follow Brett LeeFollow cricket pitchesFollow fast bowlers Brett Lee wants more conducive pitches for fast bowlers in IndiaBrett Lee feels Indian cricket pitches need to be suitable for fast bowlers to show what they can do.advertisementlast_img read more

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University research saving Ontario vineyards one grape bud at a time

With erratic temperatures and extreme weather events on the rise, researchers at Brock University’s Cool Climate Oenology & Viticulture Institute (CCOVI) are working to make vineyards across the region more resilient to climate change.After experiencing an unusually mild October, southern Ontario was blasted with a mass of frigid air that caused a record-breaking cold snap in early November — putting grapevines at risk for early frost injury.When the mercury plummeted, CCOVI researchers were already out in the vineyards collecting bud hardiness data for the VineAlert program. By also collecting data on grape bud survival rates after cold weather events, the Institute is able to give growers direction on how to manage any damage vines may have sustained.“Thankfully, we had some data available and it didn’t get cold enough to damage the vines based on our preliminary bud survival data,” said Jim Willwerth, CCOVI’s senior viticulturist, “but the extreme variances in temperature are especially problematic when the grapevines are early in their cold acclimation process.”Now in its ninth year, the VineAlert program tracks a grape bud’s ability to survive cold temperatures over the dormant season, from October to April, across Ontario’s key grape producing regions.During that period, alerts indicating which grape varieties may see damage during a cold weather event are sent out to growers and researchers. This allows them to determine when they should utilize their wind machines or other freeze-avoidance technologies.Kevin Donohue (BSc ’94), Vineyard Manager at Colio Estate Wines located on the north shore of Lake Erie, said the alert system acts as confirmation that the weather conditions warrant running his wind machine.“VineAlert allows us to correlate real-time weather data with what is actually going on in the field,” said Donohue, who also graduated from Brock’s Grape and Wine Technology certificate program in 2002. “We can adjust some of our strategies for field operations to help us to get to the safest level of dormancy going into the winter months.”Willwerth said monitoring the hardiness of the region’s grape buds is especially crucial in periods with volatile temperature fluctuations, including the shift from the cold below-average temperatures of early November to the above-seasonal temperatures experienced at present.“With all these ups and downs in temperature, we worry the plants won’t acclimate well or they might de-acclimate prematurely, leading to spring frost injury,” he explained.As weather patterns continue to become more unpredictable, it’s also important to monitor conditions on a long-term, historical basis in order to use that data to understand and predict the vines’ response.That’s why CCOVI researchers will be sampling more grape buds than usual this year in order to further bolster their cold hardiness database.The goal is to improve predictive modelling to help growers better understand how their vines will react during erratic weather conditions.Willwerth said the years of data will help researchers “further understand how growing season and variable winter conditions impact hardiness, which will allow us to better protect the vines and better understand how viticulture may change in the future.”Willwerth operates the VineAlert program along with CCOVI Professional Affiliate Kevin Ker, of KCMS Applied Research and Consulting, and CCOVI Director Debbie Inglis. read more

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