Cape Breton Health to Test Cancer Education Program

first_imgCANCER CARE N.S.–Cape Breton Health to Test Cancer EducationProgram Cancer patients, their families and health-care workers in CapeBreton have a new tool designed to help them through the variousstages of the disease. Cancer Care Nova Scotia today, Oct. 7, announced the introductionof the Oncology Interactive Education Series (OIES), aninteractive, computer-based cancer-education program forpatients, their families and health professionals. The program was developed in Canada by Jack Digital Productionsin collaboration with Toronto’s Princess Margaret Hospital. NovaScotia is the first province to test it. It is being piloted infive health districts including Cape Breton District HealthAuthority. “Hearing the words, ‘you have cancer,’ is traumatic,” said Dr.Andrew Padmos, commissioner, Cancer Care Nova Scotia. “There areso many questions, so many fears, many of which can be alleviatedif patients have access to quality cancer information.Information puts people back in the driver’s seat. It helps themunderstand their treatment options and make informed decisions. “For health professionals, access to quality patient educationhelps them support their patients. And, research also indicatesthat it leads to a better understanding of the illness, bettercompliance with treatment and thus better outcomes. OIES willrespond to the needs that patients, families and healthprofessionals have identified and ultimately lead to bettercancer care.” Each of the 24 cancer-type specific titles in the series containsbetween 18 and 25 hours of information. Each topic follows thepatient experience, providing information about diseaseprevention, early detection, symptoms, diagnosis, staging,treatment options, nutrition, pain management, psychosocial careand community support services. It also provides answers to anumber of commonly asked questions. The learning is supported bythree dimensional anatomy, patient experiences and cleargraphics. “Having the OIES program will allow patients and families to bebetter informed about their disease,” said Mona Baryluk,director, Cape Breton Cancer Centre. “This interactive programenables patients to learn at their own pace and in their owntime. Supported by volunteers, OIES supplements the one-to-oneeducation patients and families receive as part of their careduring their cancer journey.” OIES is designed to meet the need of a broad range of learningstyles, computer experience, literacy levels and language skills.Trained volunteers will help patients, families and healthprofessionals to use OIES. Patients who have access to a computermay also borrow titles from the program’s lending libraries. OIES will be evaluated to measure the use of the tool bypatients, families and health professionals, as well as theirsatisfaction with it. The evaluation will also seek healthprofessionals’ opinions on how best to use the teaching tool aspart of the care process. The decision to implement OIES acrossthe province will be based on evaluation results, which areexpected to be available in June 2005. Cancer Care Nova Scotia is a program of the Department of Health,created to reduce the burden of cancer on individuals, familiesand the health-care system through prevention, screening,education and research.last_img read more

Read More

Moroccans Protest in Al Hoceima Demanding Nasser Zefzafis Release

Rabat – On Sunday, April 7, inhabitants of the city of Al Hoceima, the main city of northern Morocco’s Rif region, took to the streets by the hundreds to demand the release of Nasser Zefzafi, the leader of the popular mass protests in 2016 and 2017 known as Hirak.Waving Amazigh (Berber) flags, protesters chanted slogans such as “Death instead of humiliation,” “The state is corrupt,” and “We want prisoners freed!”Incarcerated in the Casablanca Oukacha prison since May 2017, Nasser Zefzafi lost his appeal on April 5 at the Court of Appeals in Casablanca, which upheld his 20-year sentence. Read also: 25 European MPs Call on Morocco to Free Hirak PrisonersA Casablanca court found Hirak activists guilty on charges of “attacks on the internal and external security of the State, violence with premeditation,” and “disturbing the public order.”The court handed down sentences from 1 to 20 years for 54 Hirak activists in June 2018. Human rights organization Amnesty International deemed the guilty verdicts “unfair” and said they must be overturned.Three other prominent Hirak activists, including Ouassim El Boustati and Samir Ghid, like Zefzafi, received 20 years in prison. Hirak leaders like Zakaria Adehchour, Mohamed Haki, and Mohamed Bouhenouch received 15-year sentences.The journalist Hamid El Mahdaoui received a 3-year prison sentence on a charge related to national security threats. Human Rights Watch described the charges against Mehdaoui as “dubious.” The activists appealed the sentences, but Zefzafi refused to attend an appeal hearing in January 2019, claiming there was an “absence of the minimum requirements for a fair trial.” On April 3, 24 members of the European Parliament and an MP from the Council of Europe’s Parliamentary Assembly addressed a letter to Morocco’s justice minister Mohamed Aujjar, calling on him to free Nasser Zefzafi and “all the prisoners of the popular movement of the Rif.”Read also: Dutch MPs Summon Moroccan Ambassador Over Hirak Appeal RulingThe letter also expressed concern for Zefzafi’s deteriorating health and the distance between the court in Casablanca and the prisoners’ families in Al Hoceima. Moroccans protested outside the court to decry the ruling and call for the immediate release of the Hirak activists. The Hirak protests broke out in October 2016 following the tragic death of a fishmonger, Mohcine Fikri, who was crushed in a garbage truck when he attempted to retrieve his confiscated merchandise. read more

Read More