Dark Star Orchestra Recreates 12/28/87 To Kick Off NYE Run In Philly

first_imgVeteran Grateful Dead tribute band Dark Star Orchestra launched their four-night New Year’s run at the newly-dubbed Franklin Music Hall (formerly the Electric Factory) in Philadelphia on Friday night. Generally in top form, the band smoothly played through a scorching setlist originally performed by the Grateful Dead at Oakland Coliseum Arena on December 28, 1987.About 2,500 fans packed the smoky venue, and the atmosphere in the Franklin stayed energetic and upbeat throughout the show. The crowd started to boogie as soon as the band eased into the opening chords of “Feel Like a Stranger”. Following the staccato ending to “Stranger”, beloved three-chord jam “Franklin’s Tower” gave lead guitarist Jeff Matson some space to find his balance for the night. He did so in dramatic fashion, delivering soaring solos between verses. “New Minglewood Blues” followed, finding rhythm guitarist Rob Eaton busting out slide licks and giving renowned keyboardist Rob Barraco a chance to perform a standout organ solo.The band slowed things down a bit with a masterful, sensitive take on “Row Jimmy”, then drew on Barraco’s powerful vocals to cover the Brent Mydland-written “Far From Me.” Eaton then led the band into one of the Dead’s favorite Bob Dylan covers, “When I Paint My Masterpiece,” before Mattson took the reins and steered the group right into an uptempo “Sugaree,” typical of the ‘87 era. The boys closed out their first set with a high-energy “Hell in a Bucket,” leaving the audience wanting more.Sure enough, Dark Star came back onstage to deliver the dance tunes. They began their second set with a remarkably good “China Cat Sunflower”, which inevitably flowed into its neighbor “I Know You Rider.” This early combination had everyone dancing in the standing-room-only venue, and the band kept the romping good times going with a notable performance by bassist Skip Vangelas during a blazing “Cumberland Blues”.That’s right! – “Man Smart (Woman Smarter)” was up next, which kept the crowd standing and dancing right through the second-set staples of “Drums” and “Space”, which saw percussive theatrics from drummers Dino English and Rob Koritz. Emerging from the depths of “Space”, “The Wheel” would have been a major highlight of the show, with much of the audience belting the chorus of the familiar anthem. Yet, it found itself overshadowed by an absolutely flaming version of “Truckin’”, during which Mattson led the band to its highest peaks of the night before transitioning into a crawling, gritty take on the Howlin’ Wolf tune “Smokestack Lightning”.The clock struck midnight as the band geared up for sad, bluesy “Black Peter” before closing out the second set with a smoking hot “Sugar Magnolia.” The last tune’s “Sunshine Daydream” outro had everyone on their feet once more, and held the crowd over as the band disappeared backstage. Reappearing for the encore a few moments later, Dark Star Orchestra finished the show with a beautiful, tender “Black Muddy River”, which proved a fine ending to an excellent show.Dark Star Orchestra will finish their stand at the Franklin tonight (12/29) at 8:30 pm before heading up to play December 30 and 31 at 7 pm at the Wellmont Theater in Montclair, New Jersey.Setlist: Dark Star Orchestra | Franklin Music Hall | Philadelphia, PA | 12/28/18Set 1: Feel Like a Stranger, Franklin’s Tower, New Minglewood Blues, Row Jimmy, Far From Me, When I Paint My Masterpiece, Sugaree, Hell in a BucketSet 2: China Cat Sunflower > I Know You Rider, Cumberland Blues, Man Smart (Woman Smarter), Drums > Space, The Wheel, Truckin’, Smokestack Lightning, Black Peter, Sugar MagnoliaEncore: Black Muddy Riverlast_img read more

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Hidden Spaces: Where time stands still

first_img 12Etched in the building directly behind Gordon is Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, now part of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, one of Harvard Medical School’s teaching hospitals. 1Known as the “crown” of the Harvard Medical School (HMS), the Warren Anatomical Museum was a 34-foot-high space at the top of the administration building, now Gordon Hall. 4More than 11, 000 medical instruments and anatomy and pathology specimens were collected throughout the first half of the 20th century. One was the famed “crowbar skull.” An accidental explosion fired a 13-pound tamping iron through the head of New Hampshire construction foreman Phineas Gage. Gage lost one eye, but lived for 13 years afterward. The 3-foot rod and Gage’s skull are now housed with other specimens on the top floor of the Countway Library at the Medical School. 5John C. Warren (pictured) of Beacon Hill was one of five generations of John Warrens at the Medical School, all surgeons or anatomists. He taught anatomy at Harvard and bequeathed his family’s collection of books and pamphlets on medical and scientific subjects. 8“Gordon Hall’s windows,” says architectural historian Amy Finstein, “are an important part of the building’s classical aesthetic, with geometric patterns and symmetry that reinforce the architectural style of the entire HMS design.” 2In 1888, John Shaw Billings, founding director of the National Library of Medicine, called Warren “the best museum connected with a medical school in this country.” “The grandeur of the space in Gordon Hall and its placement as the focal point of the Harvard Medical School quad was a clear statement in 1906 as to its importance as an anatomy and pathology classroom and laboratory.” ― Dominic Hall, curator, Warren Anatomical MuseumOnce a bustling space, Gordon Hall’s upper floors, formerly the Warren Anatomical Museum, are mostly quiet now. The open, sun-filled area was part classroom, part museum for Harvard Medical School students in the first half of the last century. They learned at long tables surrounded by more than 11,000 medical specimens housed in tall glass cases. An enormous skylight runs the length of the room, with windows in the flat part of the ceiling and along the walls. Glass floors on the second story filtered light to the marble-floored level below.As outlined in the museum’s catalog, students studied healthy and morbid anatomy, including organs, crania, bones, and more. During World War II, the windows and skylight were covered for fear of attack. Eventually, offices were constructed around the periphery, taking up floor space and blocking light. The busts of the founders and notables that circled the room and the glass cases filled with anatomical and medical instruments were removed. (Many artifacts are now housed in a mini-museum on the fifth floor of Countway Library near the Harvard Medical Library, another former Gordon tenant.) Better class space was constructed elsewhere on the campus, so the students left, too.What remains in Gordon from those early days are the classic cast-iron pillars and railings and leaded-glass windows, the highest ones decorated with geometric patterns. Framed photographs and historical text on the lower walls remind us of the history of this great space. As Hall said, “The Gordon Hall gallery served as a tangible testament to the historical legacy of Harvard’s physicians and scientists, a mission which the Warren Museum continues to live as part of the Countway Library’s Center for the History of Medicine.” 11Before mid-century changes, additional windows were housed in the flat ceiling on either side of the skylight. These, along with windows in the alcoves on the sides of the room, allowed a flood of natural light, “transforming the interior of the entire upper half of the building into a translucent, almost otherworldly space,” according to author of “A Legacy So Enduring” Nora Nercessian. 9Framed by a decorative upper baluster, a student studies on the lower level. 7Shadows from the geometric-patterned windows are elongated on the wooden floor by a stairwell. 10A large, vaulted east-to-west skylight ceiling runs the entire width of the building. 15In the spirit of Greece, the Campus Beautiful movement of the early 1900s, a subset of the City Beautiful movement, influenced the architecture of the Harvard Medical School. 16If an HMS faculty member dies, the American flag on the roof of Gordon Hall is lowered to half-staff. Security shift supervisor Ray Young said they occasionally fly an important visitor’s country flag; otherwise, the flag rarely comes down. 13The floor of the lower level, Grand Hall, was set in marble, while much of the second-floor gallery was set in steel and glass, allowing light from above to filter to the lower gallery. 14In the mid 1940s, the vaulted skylight was covered for fear of an attack by the Germans. Not until 2001, when the building was renamed Gordon Hall, was the skylight finally uncovered. 6An elder John Warren’s ultimate contribution was his “bones (that they be) carefully preserved, whitened, articulated and placed in the medical college near my bust; affording, I hope, a lesson useful, at the same time, to morality and science …” 3Twenty two-story cast-iron columns encircle the room.last_img read more

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Art Museums receive significant gift of Otto Piene sketchbooks

first_img Read Full Story The Harvard Art Museums are pleased to announce an extraordinary gift of 70 sketchbooks by internationally renowned artist Otto Piene (1928–2014); the gift was made by poet and author Elizabeth Goldring, the artist’s wife. Dating from 1935 to 2014, the largely unpublished sketchbooks reflect interdisciplinary, cross-media experiments from Piene’s long career in the Boston area and abroad, including both realized and unrealized projects. In keeping with the museums’ history and ongoing commitment to training and research, the next Stefan Engelhorn Curatorial Fellow in the Busch-Reisinger Museum (2019–21) will soon be appointed to study and catalog this new gift.The gift also includes a selection of pens, the primary medium Piene used for his sketches, including the Magic Marker brand; these will be held in the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art (CTSMA) and will play a key role in the long-term preservation of Piene’s sketchbooks. Part of the museums’ Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, CTSMA is dedicated to the study of materials and issues associated with making and conserving modern works of art.“Elizabeth Goldring’s generosity will greatly benefit students and scholars from around the world,” said Martha Tedeschi, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums. “This significant gift not only opens new research avenues but also broadens the offerings available in our Art Study Center, where both general visitors and scholars can make an appointment to view works of art like these exceptional sketchbooks. Providing this type of access to our collections is an integral component of our teaching and research mission.”“The sketchbooks have found an ideal home in the Busch-Reisinger Museum,” said Lynette Roth, the Daimler Curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum and Head of the Division of Modern and Contemporary Art. The sketchbooks complement the Busch-Reisinger’s existing holdings of works by Piene, which include a small early painting and two major fire gouaches. An early sketchbook was featured in the museums’ 2018 special exhibition Inventur—Art in Germany, 1943–55. “Throughout Piene’s career, sketching was a generative site for visionary large-scale projects and for material experimentation,” said Roth.The sketchbooks strengthen the museums’ holdings of works by postwar artists — many, like the Group ZERO artists Heinz Mack and Günther Uecker, in an ongoing exchange with Piene. In addition, the Harvard Art Museums Archives holds the papers of the Howard Wise Gallery, the first gallery to exhibit Group ZERO in the United States. The museums also have strengths in international Fluxus art, including the Busch-Reisinger Museum’s near-complete collection of multiples by Joseph Beuys. The Fogg Museum’s Barbara and Peter Moore Fluxus Collection was also recently enhanced by an adjacent major gift from the nephew of artist Nam June Paik, a close collaborator of Piene. Made by Ken Hakuta, that gift included both works of art and the endowment of a new fellowship to support research on Paik.last_img read more

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6 steps to improve banking CX through artificial intelligence

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Artificial intelligence and machine learning promise nothing short of a customer experience transformation in retail banking — but the best ideas for their application could fail if projects are not built on firm foundations of clean, accurate and complete data around customers and their behaviors and financial needs.The focus on customer experience among today’s retail banks and credit unions should hardly be surprising. With financial services becoming even more commoditized, institutions increasingly must battle for consumers’ attention and wallet share against disruptive new market entrants as well as their traditional competitors. More than ever, financial institutions need to find some way to differentiate themselves.In customer experience terms, AI and machine learning can help marketers in retail banking to predict client needs and deepen relationships. They can do this through more personalizing their approaches, fine-tuning campaigns for maximum effectiveness, targeting consumer segments that represent the best acquisition prospects, and identifying attrition risks and causes. continue reading »last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Cases top 4,500, Deaths in US & Costa Rica, first Chinese case, Tamiflu issues

first_imgMay 11, 2009WHO’s novel H1N1 flu case count tops 4,500The global number of people infected with the novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu) virus rose to 4,694 from 30 countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported today. The count includes 1,626 cases and 48 deaths in Mexico and the 2,532 cases and 3 deaths reported in the United States as of yesterday. Canada has reported 284 cases and one death. [WHO update 25]US case count rises to 2,600The US H1N1 case count reached 2,600 cases and 3 deaths in 44 states today, an increase of 68 since yesterday’s update, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported today. The number of states reporting confirmed cases stayed the same. [CDC swine flu page]Washington man is third US novel H1N1 fatalityOfficials from the Washington State Department of Health (WSDH) announced on May 9 that a man in his 30s from Snohomish County died of complications from a novel H1N1 flu infection, raising the US death toll from the disease to three. The man had pneumonia and an underlying cardiac condition. The other two US deaths occurred in Texas. [May 9 WSDH press release]China reports first H1N1 caseAuthorities in China announced that a 30-year-old Chinese man who flew home after attending college in Missouri has the country’s first novel H1N1 case, and they are locating and quarantining passengers who traveled on two flights with him, Bloomberg News reported today. He reportedly had a fever and cough during a flight from Beijing to his home in Chengdu in Sichuan province. So far 130 passengers from 21 provinces have been quarantined at their local health facilities. [May 11 Bloomberg news story]Costa Rican case marks first H1N1 death south of MexicoCosta Rica reported that a 53-year-old man died of a novel H1N1 flu infection, marking the first death from the disease outside of Mexico, the United States, and Canada, the Associated Press (AP) reported. The health ministry said the man had underlying health conditions, including diabetes and chronic lung disease. So far officials don’t know how the man became infected, because he had not recently traveled out of the country.EU extends Tamiflu shelf lifeThe European Medicines Agency, the European Union’s pharmaceutical regulatory agency, on May 9 extended the shelf life of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) by 2 years to address potential shortages spurred by novel H1N1 flu outbreaks, the Financial Times reported. The extension increases the drug’s shelf life to 7 years.Critics say WHO should push manufacture of generic oseltamivirSome critics say the WHO is doing too little to promote the production of generic oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in the face of the H1N1 threat, according to an AP report. Groups such as the Third World Network say the agency should order supplies of the generic drug or encourage poor countries to do so, the story said, noting that World Trade Organization rules allow countries to override patent rights in a health crisis. A WHO official said the agency would work to obtain additional antivirals for needy countries, either through donations or through purchase at the lowest possible prices.last_img read more

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PREMIUMHouse’s widespread private-sector affiliations raise concerns: Observers

first_imgLinkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Log in with your social account Forgot Password ? house-of-representatives businesspeople conflict-of-interest Google Topics : Business players dominate the House of Representatives; six out of 10 lawmakers have direct or indirect involvement in private enterprises, a new study has found.The report comes amid a public outcry against the House’s ratification of the Job Creation Law after a furtive deliberation that included midnight decision-making and changing locations among hotels in several different cities during the week. Many critics, including scholars, say the law will be more beneficial to businesspeople than to the public.Observers have raised concerns about conflicts of interest in the House, arguing that the large number of business-affiliated lawmakers make the chamber likely to produce legislation that will disproportionately favor business interests.Marepus Corner, a group of independent sociopolitical researchers, presented the study last week. They found that 318 members of the… Facebooklast_img read more

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Brisbane apartments taking longer to sell amid oversupply concerns

first_imgIT is now taking longer than ever to sell a unit in inner Brisbane amid concerns of a looming apartment oversupply.Apartments in Brisbane inner city suburbs are now languishing on average more than two months on the market, according to a report by Place Advisory.Director Lachlan Walker said that’s too long.Unit 8/85 Victoria Street, Windsor is for sale. Picture: realestate.com.au“77 days is a long time if you’re a seller,” Mr Walker said.The fastest selling suburbs for apartments in inner Brisbane are Windsor and Newmarket in the city’s inner north, with a median unit price of $437,500 and $405,000 respectively.Units there last about 49 days on the market — still 15 days longer than houses in the city’s fastest selling suburbs.Mr Walker said that was primarily because those suburbs had less apartment stock available.Proximity to the CBD and access to public transport and schools were also major drawcards.Averaging 52 days between listing and sale, Carina is the next fastest selling suburb for apartments, with a median price of $485,000.Mr Walker said the next twelve months would be the biggest Brisbane had seen when it came to apartment settlements.But he said buyers had become more cautious and were spending more time researching a property before jumping into the apartment market.“That’s definitely impacting the existing marketplace,” he said.“It’s almost a four-month period between the initial inquiry and purchase.”“We’ll have the biggest twelve months Brisbane has seen,” .The Reserve Bank of Australia has raised concerns about Brisbane’s apartment market, flagging potential tighter lending standards amid fears a looming oversupply.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor7 hours agoBIS Oxford Economics senior manager residential Angie Zigomanis said about 40 per cent of property owners who had bought units off-the-plan in Brisbane in the past five years were now reselling at a loss.BIS Oxford Economics expects 6,500 new apartments will be completed in inner Brisbane by the end of this financial year — doubling the record high set the year before.Based on the current pipeline, in 2017/18, the number of completed apartments is expected to peak at more than 9,000.Mr Zigomanis said this oversupply could translate to a drop in apartment prices of up to 20 per cent in the next few years.The big concern is whether the Brisbane market will be able to cope with the influx in rental stock, particularly with unemployment rising in the state.Queensland’s jobless rate is now the highest in the country — surging from 6.3 per cent in January to 6.7 per cent last month, according to the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics figures.“That’s the one thing holding us back,” Mr Walker said.“We’re all holding our breath.”last_img read more

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Pension fund participants of Berne facing CHF1.7bn funding bill

first_imgThe Swiss canton of Berne has conceded it owes the BPK and the BLVK – its public pension funds – CHF1.1bn (€900m), although plan sponsors and members will need to account for the remaining CHF1.7bn funding shortfall.The canton estimated that, for the CHF10.5bn Bernische Pensionskasse (BPK), the remaining shortfall will be CHF923m, while the shortfall for the CHF5.9bn Bernische Lehrerversicherungskasse (BLVK) for teachers in the canton stands at CHF776m.According to Swiss law for cantonal pension funds passed in 2013, public authorities must decide whether to fund their pension plans fully or stick with a state guarantee.For the Berne pension funds, the target to achieve full funding was set for 20 years from now. To fill the funding gap, the BPK – which is 83.4% funded – has set additional recovery contributions of 2.3% on top of regular contributions to the fund.At the BLVK, 81% funded, the rate was set at 4.25%.The canton and various cantonal authorities will be responsible for 60% of the cost of the recovery measures, while employees will be responsible for the remainder.In 2013, the BPK managed to push its funding level up from 78.8% with a 9.3% return.At the BLVK, a 6.3% return also improved funding, which had stood at a similar level to that of the BPK at year-end 2012.Both funds will be switched from defined benefit to defined contribution plans.This decision had been postponed three years ago, as the canton was still undecided on how to run the fund in future.In May, the majority of the people of Berne agreed to the key changes set down in the new legal framework for these changes, which will take effect from 1 January 2015.last_img read more

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Helicopters Wanted for Offshore Wind Maintenance

first_imgEWE Offshore Service & Solutions (OSS) has opened a tender for helicopter services from Emden, Germany, to offshore wind farms.The contractor will be responsible for transporting personnel and material from Emden to the Riffgat, Alpha Ventus, Merkur, Trianel Windpark Borkum and Gemini offshore wind farms.According to EWE, the helicopter would be used for planned maintenance work on the turbines and offshore substations of the projects. There is also a possibility that a stopover in Borkum will sometimes be required.The contract begins on 1 April 2020 and ends on 31 March 2022, with options for renewal being twice for one year at the same conditions.The deadline for submitting applications for the tender is 8 December by 18:00 local time.EWE OSS has also recently issued a tender seeking crew transfer vessels (CTV) to service offshore wind farms from Borkum, Germany.last_img read more

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Corriette family of Laudat jointly charged for possession of Cannabis and ammunition

first_imgLocalNews Corriette family of Laudat jointly charged for possession of Cannabis and ammunition by: – August 25, 2011 Sharing is caring! Share Tweet Sharecenter_img Share 63 Views   no discussions Photo credit: cannabis-pictures.comA Laudat family of four has been jointly charged on three charges of possession of Cannabis, cultivation of Cannabis and possession of ammunition.Twenty-two year old Randy Justin Corriette, twenty year old Ronnie Mickelle Corriette, seventy-one year old Peter Corriette and fifty-one year old Jacqueline Corriette were brought before Magistrate Evelina Baptiste where the charges were read to them.Randy Justin Corriette pleaded guilty to all three charges, while his brother, father and mother all pleaded not guilty.The facts of the case presented to the Court by Police Prosecutor Corporal Toussaint indicates that a search warrant was executed by Woman Police Constable Luke L on the home of the Defendants at 5:30am on the 24th of August where four clear plastic bags with what appeared to be Cannabis, one live round of .32 ammunition, and twenty-seven trees of what appeared to be Cannabis plants about thirty feet from the house were seized.Woman Police Constable Luke L questioned the Defendant regarding the contents of his search and he replied, “Seeds that there man, marijuana seeds” referring to the four clear plastic bags.The Defendant’s Counsel; Kondwani Williams, in pleading to the Court on his behalf said his client had found himself in a very unfortunate situation.According to Mr Williams’ submission to the Court; the Defendant is employed with the Rain Forest Aerial Tram as a lift operator but is unable to earn any form of remuneration from his employer as they are closed due to the down time in the tourist season.Williams also highlighted that his client has co-operated fully with the police, accepts responsibility for his wrongful actions, is very apologetic for having put his family through this ordeal and the intended purpose of the live round of point 32 ammunition was to make a pendant for his gold chain. He therefore pleaded with the Court to be lenient with the Defendant and give him a second chance so that he could look beyond his predicament.Magistrate Evelina Baptiste in sentencing the Defendant informed him that she had considered all factors; those in his favor as well as those not in your favor, those being his guilty plea and no previous offenses.Mr Corriette was sentenced to pay $3750.00 by February 28th, 2012 or in default spend one year imprisonment on the charge of possession of ammunition.On the charge of possession of Cannabis he was ordered to pay $1200.00 by February 28th, 2012 or in default could face five months imprisonment, and on the charge of cultivation of Cannabis he was ordered to pay $25, 000.00 or in default spend nine months imprisonment.The Police Prosecutor did not present any evidence against Ronnie Corriette, Peter Corriette and Jacqueline Corriette therefore Magistrate Baptiste informed them that the matters filed against them have been dismissed for want of prosecution.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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