Amanda Palmer and Edward Ka-Spel Spin Rainbows In Brooklyn [Photos]

first_imgLoad remaining images Load remaining images Amanda Palmer and Edward Ka-Spel made Brooklyn’s Rough Trade the third stop on their United States and European Tour this past Sunday night, supporting their new album, I Can Spin a Rainbow. Amanda and Edward were joined on stage by violinist and longtime Legendary Pink Dots contributor Patrick Q. Wright, as the trio powered through a variety of songs from the new album, along with tunes native to both Amanda and Edward.Billed as an intimate evening, this nomenclature proved true on a variety of levels; the sold-out, 250 person capacity venue felt comfortable at all times, the crowd was delighted to some of the back stories behind the new songs, and while there were sound issues with the band’s monitors during most of the show, it prompted Amanda to quip about the phantoms messing with the power to a crowd of complaint-less music lovers.Sonically, the live versions of the songs off I Can Spin A Rainbow exceeded expectations. The journey was both delicate and aggressive, and always engaging. Think classical punk cabaret with a Macbook on stage. Not sure if that’s a valid description, I am just a photog after all, but it is what comes to mind if you take the album for a spin and scroll through the gallery below. Or better, go see them live for yourself on one of the remaining tour dates.Amanda Palmer and Edward Ka-Spel TourMay 23 – San Francisco, CA @ DNA LoungeMay 24 – Los Angeles, CA @ TroubadourMay 31 – Warsaw, PO @ ProximaJune 1 – Munich, DE @ MuffathalleJune 2 – Leipzig, DE @ Wave & Gotik TreffenJune 4 – Prague, CZ @ Palác AkropolisJune 5 – Hamburg, DE @ FabrikJune 9 – Antwerp, BE @ Trix ClubJune 10 – Amsterdam, NL @ MelkwegJune 11 – Paris, FR @ CigaleJune 13 – London, UK @ HeavenJune 16 – Vienna, AT @ Porgy & Bess[Photos and words by Stephen Olker]last_img read more

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The Cynthia Wight Rossano Endowed Prize Fund

first_imgA new endowed prize fund, established by Daniel Pierce ’56, has been named in honor of Cynthia Wight Rossano for her services to Harvard University and to commemorate Harvard’s history. The Cynthia Wight Rossano Prize in Harvard History awards the best essay by a Harvard College undergraduate. Drawing upon primary sources, the essays must consider any aspect of Harvard history, contribute scholarly knowledge, and must be no longer than 10 pages. A multimedia presentation by a single Harvard student may be submitted in place of an essay.Essays or presentations must be submitted no later than May 1 to the Office of the University Marshal, Wadsworth House. Judging the prize will be University Marshal Jackie O’Neill; the Rev. Professor Peter J. Gomes, the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church; and a professor in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to be chosen by committee members. Judges reserve the right not to award the prize in any year when submissions do not meet their standards. The prize amount will be set annually by the committee of judges.For more information, visit the Office of the University Marshal Web site.last_img read more

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Loeb House garden: Colorful blooms of Elizabeth Gray

first_img 4The Loeb House gate frames the garden. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Elizabeth Gray, senior associate secretary to the University, has tended the Loeb House garden in Harvard Yard since 1985. “It began as a very small effort,” said Gray. “A row of potentilla was already in place alongside the holly hedge when I started adding annuals to extend the season of bloom. Then one perennial led to another.”Taking inspiration from a visit to Cambridge, England, Gray described her plantings as “exuberant cottage-style garden,” that are “a little quirky and not too neat, with a season of bloom that starts with early spring crocus and runs until late October — including a big crimson splash of peonies around Commencement.”As a walk-to-work Cambridge resident without a home garden of her own, Loeb House’s garden has been a constant learning opportunity for Gray and her colleagues who help maintain the space. “The site has its own challenges, from part sun to maple shade, each area supporting different plants. Harvard’s decision to compost allowed significant enrichment of the soil in recent years, and the flowers and shrubs have just taken off from there.”Gray also finds satisfaction in the regulars who check in throughout the season to see what’s in bloom and compare gardening successes and failures with tourists who discover them by chance.“People tell me they stop by on their way from work for a quick change of pace as they decompress from the day,” said Gray. “Many people find that spending time around flowers increases their own sense of balance and harmony. I know that is true for me.” 7A giant onion (Allium giganteum) — an ornamental perennial — flowers in the Loeb House garden. Jon Chase/ Harvard Staff Photographer 5White stargazer lilies add an elegant note. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Sunlight shines through the cherry and crab apple trees at Loeb House. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Yellow blooms are ruffled by the wind outside Loeb House, which is located across from Lamont Library. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer center_img 6An up-close view of a bloom. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 2Dewy peonies glisten outside Loeb House. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Elizabeth Gray works in the garden. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Elizabeth Gray prunes back some overgrowth in the Loeb House garden. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer last_img read more

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New group of Harvard College Professors

first_imgFive faculty members across a wide range of disciplines have been named Harvard College Professors.Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith announced the honor for Robin Bernstein, Dillon Professor of American History and professor of African and African American studies and of studies of women, gender, and sexuality; Lawrence Bobo, W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences; George Lauder, professor of biology and Henry Bryant Bigelow Professor of Ichthyology; Yukio Lippit, professor of history of art and architecture, Japanese art; and Amy Wagers, Forst Family Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology.“These faculty members bring extraordinary passion and dedication to their work, and I am delighted to announce these appointments,” said Smith. “Their commitment to learning and intellectual energy are qualities that I cherish. I am delighted to recognize these outstanding individuals in the FAS for the impact they have had on the lives and education of our students.”The Harvard College Professorships were launched in 1997 through a gift from John and Frances Loeb. They are five-year appointments that include extra support for research or scholarly activities, as well as a semester of paid leave, or summer salary.Robin Bernstein. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer.Robin Bernstein“Performance is everywhere, it completely surrounds us,” said Bernstein. “Not just in videos, sports, concerts, and television … we perform in our everyday lives, all of us. My goal is for students to understand the complex relationship between race, gender, sexuality, and performance. There is always some sort of relationship, even if it is not straightforward.”Bernstein was an actor and playwright before shifting to a career as a scholar.“What I really wanted was to think about U.S. cultural history. I’ve also had a longstanding interest in childhood because you can add persuasiveness to any political argument by claiming it supports children. Ideas about childhood have been crucial to arguments about race since the middle of the 19th century.”Lawrence D. Bobo . Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerLawrence BoboThe Civil Rights mission of Martin Luther King Jr. helped lead Bobo toward research and teaching focused on race, politics, and social inequity.“I grew up under the warming sun of Martin Luther King’s vision and the Civil Rights struggle,” he said. “Too young to directly participate, I was nonetheless galvanized by the struggle, the ideals, and hope of those years for a society freed from the burdens of racism, discrimination, and inequality.”Bobo specializes in social psychology. Among his popular courses is an undergraduate seminar titled “Race, Racism, and American Politics,” which he will offer again this fall. During spring semester he taught “Introduction to African American Studies” with Alphonse Fletcher University Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr.George Lauder. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerGeorge LauderLauder brings a lifelong passion for marine life to bio-robotics, helping design new systems for underwater exploration.“I’ve always been interested in ocean life,” he said. “I’m a scuba diver, I like being in the ocean, and I’m also very interested in mechanics and how things work. So this really combines those two areas.”At the moment, Lauder is focused on learning from fish. “We want to understand how fish swim so efficiently and effectively, with the goal of using that information to design more efficient robot systems.”Lauder has incorporated plenty of fieldwork in his classes, including visits to the Charles River.“Students seem to really enjoy the hands-on aspect of my courses, so I try to offer as much of that as I can.”Yukio Lippit. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerYukio LippitLippit has spent two decades studying the history of Japanese art, with a particular focus on links to Zen Buddhism.“One of the aspects of teaching the history of art that is particularly rewarding is the special role that exhibitions and the study of objects can play in pedagogy,” he said.Lippit emphasized that students’ work is critical to driving that process.“Much of what I do is to stage encounters between students and artworks, and then to work with students to move outward in ever-larger concentric circles toward cultural history, to gain insights into the world that made them. What I’ve found is that, increasingly, students are teaching me how to stage these encounters for others. I’ve enjoyed sharing with students how artistic representation can relate to daily living, religious practice, and philosophical inquiry in the most remarkable and seemingly counterintuitive ways.”Amy Wagers. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerAmy WagersFor Wagers, a career in the Department of Stem Cell Regenerative Biology is not merely a profession; it’s personal.“I was a grad student studying immunology, and I received a call because I was a match for a bone-marrow transplant,” she said. “I got really interested in the field and decided to make it my focus.”Wagers is particularly interested in the biology of aging.“People recover from injury slower as they get older,” she said. “I’m really interested in how blood and skeletal systems change with age, and how we can boost the process of recovering from injuries.”Going forward, she hopes to share her passion for biology with a wider range of students.“I would love to introduce a general education course for students who are not concentrating in biosciences, but have an appreciation for it and would like to advance their understanding of it.”last_img read more

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Sheffield named chief development officer at Art Museums

first_imgThe Harvard Art Museums are pleased to announce the appointment of Melanie Sheffield as chief development officer, a new leadership position in the museums’ Office of Institutional Advancement; she will assume the role on March 4, 2019. The chief development officer will provide strategic direction for the planning and execution of all functions related to development, in alignment with the museums’ mission, vision, and goals. Sheffield comes to the museums from Boston Ballet, where she has served since 2013, first as director of individual giving and then as director of development, a promotion she received during her first year with the organization. She is returning to the museums for this new role, having previously served as assistant director of membership and special programs in 2005–06.With over 17 years of fundraising and development experience in cultural and higher education institutions, Sheffield brings a wealth of knowledge and insight to her new role at the museums. She has a deep understanding of the philanthropic landscape in Boston and beyond, and has worked with some of the region’s foremost donors. She established Boston Ballet’s first planned giving program and is personally responsible for a portfolio of 50 of the ballet’s top prospects and donors.“We are extraordinarily fortunate to welcome someone of Melanie’s caliber to our team at the Harvard Art Museums,” said Martha Tedeschi, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director. “She is perfectly positioned to build on the success we have had in generating enthusiasm and support for our unique teaching and research mission. Her passion for the arts is palpable and inspiring; I look forward to her energy and ideas as we forge new paths in stewarding our fundraising efforts, strengthening relationships with current friends, and reaching out to bring others into our network of supporters.”Prior to her work at Boston Ballet, Sheffield served in development leadership roles at the Animal Rescue League of Boston (2010–13: director of advancement; director of the president’s council) and Wentworth Institute of Technology (2006–10: interim vice president of institutional advancement; major gifts officer; director of the annual fund and donor relations). Sheffield earned a B.A. in communications from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1999, with a minor in history of art and architecture.“I am thrilled to be returning to the Harvard Art Museums as the new chief development officer and to partner with Director Martha Tedeschi in advancing the museums’ exceptional mission,” said Sheffield. “As an ardent supporter of the arts, it is an honor to join this community and to have the opportunity to engage current friends and create new connections with those interested in investing in the museums’ vibrant future.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Mendoza takes top spot in rankings

first_imgThe Mendoza College of Business was named the top undergraduate business school in the nation for the first time in Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s fifth annual rankings, which were released March 4.Notre Dame, which was ranked second in 2009, finished ahead of the business schools of University of Virginia, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and University of Pennsylvania. The criteria include students’ response to teachers, SAT scores, recruiters’ responses to students and student-faculty ratio.“Students boasting about the school’s commitment to ethics, Catholic beliefs and passionate professors helped land Mendoza in first place,” the BusinessWeek article said. “During an economic crisis that has left many young people unemployed, Mendoza also managed a strong showing in career placement, with 95 percent of grads landing a job offer within three months of graduation.”Carolyn Woo, dean of the Mendoza College of Business, said the University’s top spot was “not a sudden event,” noting that the school had been ranked high in the past. “We never set out to excel in the rankings,” she said. “We were doing what we were doing before the rankings. The goal was not to win according to the criteria of the rankings.”Woo said commitment to undergraduate education was the motivating factor for the College’s rise.“What got us there is we are very serious about the education of our students,” she said. “If our students do their part we will do our part.”Woo offered the example of the new Junior Research Challenge: Foresight in Business & Society course, which became a part of the required curriculum last year.“As painful as the Foresight course is … it is really to give our students the skills to look at future issues and trends,” she said. “Our eye is always on the preparation of our students.”Woo said the College’s effective and hardworking faculty, challenging curriculum and devotion to Notre Dame’s core principles helped the school receive high marks from students and recruiters.“When recruiters rank us highly, they probably look at a couple of different things such as how well our students are prepared academically, people skills and ethical judgment,” she said.In addition, Woo credited the entire Notre Dame experience, ranging from First Year of Studies to dorm life, as factors.“We’re not trying to be different,” she said. “We did this because we want to be faithful to the Notre Dame mission.”Woo said the commitment of director Lee Svete and his entire Career Center team were also vital in helping the College claim the top spot, as were the alumni who helped students find jobs.“The alumni really stepped up,” she said.However, Notre Dame is still behind its peers in a few of the items, including a high student to faculty ratio of 19 to 1, lower SATs and lower salaries for faculty members.Woo said many of these statistical issues stem from Mendoza’s policy of admitting anyone who was originally admitted to Notre Dame.“We found that students flourish as business majors,” she said. “Their skills and education background are highly valued.”Woo has resisted the temptation to cap the number of students admitted to Mendoza, largely because freshman year GPA and SAT scores are not adequate measures of long term success.“We are not going to change our policy of how we accept students just so we can be higher in the rankings,” she said. “Our mission is to serve people.”Woo said she had more faith in the BusinessWeek rankings then similar systems largely because they exclude peer evaluations and are more objective.“No rankings are perfect, but I have to say that the BusinessWeek rankings have more legitimate items than other rankings,” she said.Nonetheless, Woo said she would never tailor Mendoza’s curriculum to the rankings.“We were not trying to be number one,” she said. “We’re glad to be recognized as number one, but we have certain principles and commitments that we’re going to always keep.”Woo said she doesn’t believe Notre Dame’s top ranking will lead to a glut of students applying to Mendoza.“This is nothing new because we were number three and then we were number two, so it’s not like all of a sudden we became excellent,” she said. “I hope that people don’t come into the business school unless they are interested in business, but it could generate more interest.”Woo said Mendoza’s top spot was representative of the University’s overall constant striving for excellence.“This is a school to honor the Blessed Mother, and [University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh] once said, mediocrity is not the way we honor the Blessed Mother,” she said. “Everything we do, we should do it as well as we can. We did what we did because it is our mission.”last_img read more

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Families share Notre Dame stories

first_imgThree families in the Notre Dame community gathered Saturday morning to tell their stories of love, family and Our Lady’s University. “We stayed close to campus for Matt’s first semester here because we were concerned about him,” Matt’s mother DeAnn Swinton said. “But after those first months, Mike and I let go and let Matt take charge. For us, Matt being at Notre Dame was a gift from God.” “I went to a pep rally and saw [Irish football coach Frank] Leahy speak,” he said. “He told us to treasure our time at Notre Dame, because we would never experience anything like it again. I believe that being here is the closest experience you will ever have to being in heaven.” “In fact, the Belatti’s found a way to share their love for Notre Dame in an absolutely incredible way … by making it possible for an entire family to benefit from a Notre Dame education,” Philbin said. During his four years at Notre Dame, Swinton lived in a room built to be handicap-accessible so he would be physically able to live without his parents. “We moved to Michigan and had to rough it for a while,” de Araujo said. “It was really hard for my dad, who spoke no English at first. When it came time to apply to college, I started applying for scholarships for low-income families. I applied to every school that allowed this opportunity.” Philbin introduced Frank Belatti, a 1969 graduate, and his wife Cathy, as a prime example of a family that loves Notre Dame. “As you will hear today, planned gifts made by men and women who love and believe in Notre Dame have made a remarkable difference, not only in the life of the University, but also in the lives of countless students,” he said. Regis Philbin, a 1953 alum, then took the stage for the core of the event. He began by explaining the purpose of the gift-planning initiative. Philbin then asked Swinton what memory he treasured most from his time at Notre Dame. Philbin recalled one job interview he was rejected from before his career took off. After receiving the news, Philbin found himself driving down the Indiana Toll Road instead of the airport to return home. After de Araujo left the stage, Philbin played a video that introduced the third and final guest of the day. Philbin then invited Laura, Selina and Precious Okonokhua to offer their thanks to the Belatti’s. The Belatti’s decided to make a gift to the University that would provide scholarship assistance to an entire family. The Okonokhuas, who have had three children graduate from Notre Dame and two children currently enrolled, are currently utilizing the gift. Philbin then told the story of his first visit to the Notre Dame campus. According to the website for the Office of Gift Planning, the initiative was launched this year by the University to focus on “encouraging greater numbers of the Notre Dame family to plant seeds for the future.” Thrilled by the University’s effort to assist their son during his time at Notre Dame, the Swinton’s made a planned gift through their wills to the school. “You are about to see a truly remarkable story. It’s a story about the love of a mother and a father for their son. It’s a story about the courage of student who, far more than most, faced the challenges of attending Notre Dame ⎯ what though the odds be great or small,” he said. “It’s a story about how the entire Notre Dame Family responded to make sure that one very special young man shared the Notre Dame experience to the fullest.” “Cathy and I have been involved with Habitat for Humanity for a long time,” Belatti said. “After meeting the Okonokhuas and building a friendship with them, we have really seen the difference that this opportunity has made in their lives. This scholarship assistance program reminded us of all the ways we love Notre Dame.” “Words cannot express how we feel about them,” Laura Okonokhua, a 2010 graduate, said. “This is a great thing for not only our family, but the other families that will benefit from the Belatti’s generosity.” Originally from Nigeria, the Okonokhua’s moved to Atlanta and moved into the 100th house that Frank and Cathy Belatti built. “The substantial impact of this remarkable gift on Notre Dame students will last forever,” Philbin said. “Over the past 40 years, Dailey’s original gift has grown into a truly transformative amount, providing financial assistance to thousands of Notre Dame’s students. This school year alone, 223 students will receive $4.5 million in financial assistance.” Once the Belatti’s exited the stage, Philbin told the story of Florence Dailey, a woman from upstate New York who had no known association with Notre Dame. Yet in 1966, Dailey bequeathed half of her stock shares to the University. Philbin then introduced Emily de Araujo, a junior at Notre Dame and one of the beneficiaries of Dailey’s gift. De Araujo moved to the United States when she was a year old with her family from Brazil so her brother, who is autistic, could lead a better life. The program began with the performance of an original song by John Scully, a Notre Dame All-American and a 1980 graduate of the University, sung by Cathy Richardson, a singer recognized for “Here Come the Irish.” “I saw the sun was shining on Our Lady who rests on top of the Dome as I drove past the building,” Philbin said. “I drove past the stadium and remembered Coach Leahy’s words. I was going to go back and make my life happen. I was hired for a job in New York, and the rest is history.” “Love Thee Notre Dame,” Philbin said. “The final four words of our Alma Mater sum up the powerful emotions and love we all share for Our Lady’s University. One goal of the Love Thee Notre Dame initiative is to create opportunities for alumni, parents and friends to create a stronger future for Notre Dame and a lasting legacy for themselves and their families.” Notre Dame was the first school to accept de Araujo and offer her the financial aid she needed to attend college. “Through our giving experience, other students with mobile disabilities will see what Notre Dame has to offer them,” Mike said. “We hope other students will have the opportunity to have the experiences Matt had here.” “Being on campus this weekend and seeing students with their backpacks has made me want to jump in and get some learning done,” Swinton said. “Some of my friends are here for the game. These are some of the guys I will never lose touch with.” “I’ll always remember [singing] the Alma Mater with my friends for the last time at our graduation,” Matt said. “When Matt had applied to Notre Dame, we made several visits to the campus and everyone here was very accommodating,” Matt’s father Mike Swinton said. “The spirit and community at Notre Dame was unlike any other school we had visited.” Approximately 500 people attended the “Love Thee Notre Dame” celebration, a gift-planning initiative in Leighton Concert Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Matt Swinton, a 2012 graduate, suffers from spinal muscular atrophy, a group of inherited diseases that cause muscle damage and weakness. Confined to a wheelchair, Matt was able to make the most out of his four years at Notre Dame with the help of his parents, friends and the University. Philbin said all gifts, no matter the size, have had lasting effects on Notre Dame. A video relayed the Belatti’s story of building houses for Habitat for Humanity that transformed into a relationship with a single mother and her five children. “The acceptance letter said ‘Welcome Home,’ and Notre Dame was the school that gave me the first chance,” de Araujo said. “I was offered more scholarships to other schools as well, but that didn’t matter. I knew Notre Dame was it.”last_img read more

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India’s Gujarat state government says it will stop approving new thermal power projects

first_imgIndia’s Gujarat state government says it will stop approving new thermal power projects FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Indian Express:In a first-of-its-kind move aimed at curbing the burning of fossil fuel for power generation, Gujarat government on Saturday announced that it will not give fresh permissions for setting up new thermal power stations in the state.A decision to not provide permission for new thermal power projects has been taken by Gujarat chief minister Vijay Rupani, stated an official release here. The 8-10 per cent of annual increase in power demand will be met through non-conventional sources, the statement said adding that the move will “guide” other states in the country.When quizzed about the development, Gujarat’s energy minister Saurab Patel told The Indian Express, “In a meeting yesterday, it was decided that we will no more be going for any new coal capacities.” When asked how the government plans to satiate the annual increase in power demand, Patel said, “We are going very high on solar renewable.Gujarat currently has a total installed power generation capacity of 26800 MW. Of this capacity, 19555 MW is conventional power, while 7273 MW is capacity through non-conventional sources like solar, wind and hydro, states the socioeconomic review of the state for the year 2018-19. The private sector in Gujarat consisting of Torrent Power, Adani Power, Essar and Tata Group contributes a lion share of power produced through largely through coal.The total power consumption in Gujarat rose by about 9.7 percent in 2017-18. During this year, 85445 million units of power was consumed in the state, as against 77881 million units in 2016-17. The highest consumption of 55.52 percent was reported for industrial and commercial use, followed by agriculture at 21.46 percent. The domestic use for power in Gujarat was 17.22 percent while the rest were for other uses like public water works and public lighting.Taking about the move, veteran energy expert KK Bajaj says, “Most of the thermal power stations of GSECL (Gujarat State Electricity Corporation Limited — a wholly owned subsidiary of Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam) are shut, due to the high cost of generation. Secondly, the Plant Load Factor (PLF) of the functioning plants is just 40 percent. So, the state government is encouraging more renewable energy projects in the state.”More: Gujarat govt not to issue permits for new thermal plantslast_img read more

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Wisconsin’s Alliant Energy to spend $900 million buying 675MW of solar capacity

first_imgWisconsin’s Alliant Energy to spend $900 million buying 675MW of solar capacity FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Wisconsin utility Alliant Energy will spend $900 million buying 675 megawatts of utility-scale solar projects as it moves to replace uneconomic coal-fired plants with renewables.Alliant, which serves about 1 million customers in the Midwestern states of Wisconsin and Iowa, currently relies on renewables for about 20 percent of its generation capacity, largely wind power in Iowa, with twice as much coming from natural gas plants. On Tuesday Alliant said it will “acquire” six large-scale solar projects in Wisconsin from developers NextEra Energy Resources, Ranger Power and Savion. The projects, ranging from 50 megawatts up to a 200-megawatt development owned by NextEra, represent a huge leap forward for Wisconsin’s solar market. The state has around 150 megawatts of installed solar today, according to Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.Alliant’s solar news comes just days after it announced plans to close the remaining 380-megawatt unit of its coal-fired Edgewater Generating Station in Sheboygan by the end of 2022, a move it said will save customers “hundreds of millions of dollars in costs.” Alliant subsidiary Wisconsin Power and Light closed two other, older units at Edgewood over the past five years.In 2018 Alliant established its “Clean Energy Blueprint,” which aims for 30 percent renewables by 2030 on the way to an 80-percent carbon emissions cut by 2050. The blueprint includes a goal of 1 gigawatt of solar by 2023, as well as an accelerated closure of the coal plants that still made up 30 percent of its generation as of last year.Most Midwestern states are not known for their solar markets, but utilities across the region are increasingly staking out clean energy and decarbonization plans that move beyond onshore wind and embrace large-scale solar. Over the past few years, the active interconnection queue for Midwestern grid operator MISO has steadily shifted from wind to solar as its primary renewable resource. According to a May 2020 report from MISO, of the 68 gigawatts of projects seeking interconnection, 40.6 gigawatts are solar projects.[Jeff St. John]More: Wisconsin has 150MW of solar. Alliant just bought 675MW morelast_img read more

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December Freaking First

first_imgDecember freaking first and not a snowflake in sight. The forecast for Breckenwolf, the tiny ski hill that graciously hosts our weekly Whiskey Wednesday forays, shows temps in the mid 60s throughout the weekend. I’m wearing shorts right now. And a Hawaiian shirt. I might go get on the river later. December freaking first and not a ski day in sight. How am I supposed to start celebrating Whiskey Wednesday without any snow? Without the world’s slowest lift running at Breckenwolf? I’m an optimist, so in my heart I know that winter will eventually come, and it might even be the epic kind of winter where I get to ski from my house to the bars in town, but I want Jack Frost here now. I’m like a kid who can’t wait for Christmas. I want to get the band back together. I want to start doing stupid shit with my fellow middle-aged fathers in the middle of the week. I want to bitch about how cold my hands are when I pull the flask of whiskey out of my pocket on the lift. I want to scout sketchy jumps on the side of trails and then use a proven recipe of peer pressure and child-like taunting to convince my friends to hit those jumps at high speeds. I want Whiskey Wednesday now. Of course, no amount of wanting will make it happen. So, I’ll simply sit here in my shorts, getting pissed when the air conditioning turns on in my house and search the internet for half-ass long range weather forecasts that promise unusual amounts of snow for the Southeastern United States. And I’ll drink this beer, New Belgium’s limited release Sour Saison, because it’s not a winter beer at all. It’s a light, almost whimsical, warm weather beer that blends an easy drinking farmhouse ale with a sour for an interesting mix that can only be described as “rustic.” It’s bright, and only slightly sour, like a green apple, and delicious. As much as I like this beer, I’d like to be drinking barrel aged stouts and porters with gingerbread spices because it’s winter, but those heavy beers just don’t feel right given the current temps. I can’t put on holiday weight when I’m still trapesing around the neighborhood in running shorts. So I’ll wait. Patiently (not that patiently). Until the snow falls and Whiskey Wednesday kicks in and then I can start drinking like a proper adult who’s trying to avoid his responsibilities for one night a week.last_img read more

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